Skip to main content

Full text of "Yale medicine : alumni bulletin of the School of Medicine."

See other formats


YALE MEDICAL LIBRARY 


3 9002 08627 9636 









































































































/ 


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2017 with funding from 
Arcadia Fund 


https://archive.org/details/yalemedicinealum3419yale 




















YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE/WINTER 1968 






COVER: Hallucinogenic drugs cast long shadows 
in their medical and social implications. LSD 
sugar cubes, photographed by Robert Perron, 
introduce an article on research by members of 
the Department of Psychiatry, beginning on p. 2. 


YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE / WINTER 1968 / VOL. 3 NO. 1 


Contents 


Research into Hallucinogens by Rita D. Berkson 2 

Buriram: A Different View of Medicine by Laura A. Smith 7 

Music and Metabolism 11 

An Innovation in Public Health Lectures 16 

Eli Ives of New Haven and Yale by Gary C. Burget, M.D. 18 

AIM Campaign 22 

In and About Sterling Hall 24 

Alumni News 28 


YALE MEDICINE is published three times a year—in the fall, winter, and 
spring — and is distributed to members of the Association of Yale Alumni in 
Medicine, students, and others interested in the School of Medicine. Com¬ 
munications may be addressed to The Editor, Room L200, 333 Cedar Street, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 06510. 


Editor Arthur Ebbert, Jr., M.D. 

Managing Editor Kate Swift 

Assistant Managing Editor Brenda M. Large 

Designer Sarah P. Sullivan 

Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 
Benjamin Castleman, M.D., ’31, President 
George A. Carden, Jr., M.D., ’35, Vice-President 
Robert F. Bradley, Jr., M.D., '43, Secretary 
Lawrence K. Pickett, M.D., '44, Past President 

Executive Committee 
Philip S. Brezina, M.D., '40 
Jonathan T. Lanman, M.D., '43 
Louis E. Silcox, M.D., '35 
Richard D. Otis, M.D., '49 
Eric W. Mood, M.P.H., '43 
William B. Kiesewetter, M.D., ’49hs 





Research into Hallucinogens 


by Rita D. Berkson 


U ntil a very few years ago, mind-distorting drugs 
were familiar in this country only to anthropologists 
who studied American Indian or Eastern cultures, or to 
literary critics interested in the lives of certain artists 
[Coleridge, for example, whose fantasy poem “Kubla 
Khan” was written during an opium trance). Americans 
have always utilized stimulants such as caffeine, to¬ 
bacco, and alcohol, but rarely hallucinogens. As a result, 
there is only a small body of literature in this country 
dealing with the hallucinogenic drugs, and what has been 
written in Eastern countries has seldom been translated 
or made applicable to American society. 

But the circumstances are changing. Psychedelic 
drugs, ranging from marijuana to LSD, are rapidly be¬ 
coming more accessible and acceptable among high 
school and college students, hippies, and even middle- 
class professionals. Since 1960, when the infamous ex¬ 
periments of Timothy Leary and Richard Alpert at 
Harvard attracted national attention to the “mind- 
expanders,” their use has increased dramatically. Cor¬ 
respondingly, psychologists and psychiatrists have 
stepped up study of the effects of psychedelic drugs, 
both medically in individuals and socially within student 
sub-groups. 

Three hallucinogenic drugs are most widely used by 
students: marijuana, derived naturally from the hemp 
plant [although recent reports indicate the possibility 
that marijuana may someday be easily synthesized and 
available through the laboratory); mescaline, most com¬ 
monly taken in the form of peyote buttons; and LSD, a 
relatively new synthetic drug and by far the most potent 
of the three. First synthesized in 1938 at the Sandoz Re¬ 
search Laboratories in Switzerland, LSD’s psychedelic 
effects were discovered five years later by a researcher 
who accidentally consumed a minute amount and ex¬ 
perienced a “not unpleasant inebriation," consisting of 
illusions and hallucinations. 

The central experience under LSD is very similar to 
experiences reported about psychosis: a reaction to 
one’s environment as if it were totally unfamiliar and 
overwhelmingly vivid (“disrupts habituation to sensory 
perceptions”); a sense of knowing and learning things 
as if for the first time (“loss of integration of present with 
past”);hallucinations and delusions (“confusional states, 
dreamlike revivals of past traumatic events or childhood 
memories”). In some cases, these psychotic-like symp- 


This review of research by Yale psychiatrists is re¬ 
printed from the November 1967 issue of Yale Alumni 
Magazine, of which Mrs. Berkson is associate editor. 


toms remain for days or even months following the drug¬ 
taking. 

Aldous Huxley, who in 1931 in Brave New World cre¬ 
ated soma, a drug much like LSD, experimented with 
mescaline in the early 1950s and wrote about it in Doors 
of Perception: 

Place and distance cease to be of much interest. The 
mind does its perceiving in terms of intensity of exist¬ 
ence, profundity of significance, relationships within a 
pattern. I saw the books, but was not at all concerned i 
with their positions in space. 

A rose is a rose is a rose. But these chair legs were ; 
chair legs were St. Michael and all the Angels. 

What the rest of us see only under the influence of 
mescalin, the artist is congenitally equipped to see all the 
time. His perception is not limited to what is biologically 
or socially useful. 

Experimentally, LSD has been used in therapy, most re¬ 
cently in the treatment of narcotic addicts at the U.S. 
Public Health Service Hospital at Lexington, Ky. Its most I 
dramatic medical use has been in treatment of terminal 
cancer patients. The drug not only relieves pain more, 
effectively than morphine, but it seems to change the 
mode of pain perception: “The pain is here, but I’m 
somewhere else—nothing really belongs to you, not even) 
your pain.” 

LSD is also being used to explore brain function and 
the chemical bases for mental illnesses. And for the past 
ten years the Yale medical school has been a center for 
research about the function of the brain. 

Daniel X. Freedman, until last year professor of psy-j 
chiatry at Yale and currently chairman of the department) 
of psychiatry at the University of Chicago, established a 
laboratory of psychopharmacology here in 1958, with 
the intent of bridging the gap between biochemistry and) 
psychiatry. Dr. Freedman’s strategy for research was to: 
experiment with drugs, such as LSD, which induced 
behavioral as well as chemical changes as a way of un¬ 
derstanding the connections between chemical and be¬ 
havioral processes that occur naturally in psychiatric; 
disorders. LSD, he proposed, should be used to provoke: 
model psychoses in animals which, though not identical 
to naturally occurring disorders, could still offer a tangi¬ 
ble grip upon processes and mechanisms related to psy¬ 
chotic behavior. 

Dr. Freedman attempted to answer the question of 
how biochemical changes could produce a psychotic 
state, and for the years 1958-65 developed at Yale one of 
the few sustained bodies of research in that field in the 
country. He interested others in the pursuit of the mys 


2 










» 



)r. George K. Aghajanian 


teries of hallucinogenic drugs, including medical stu¬ 
dents and residents who are still working here. In his 
own lab, Dr. Freedman established the fact that LSD 
affects a particular chemical in the brain, known as sero¬ 
tonin, and that there was a direct relationship between 
the period of time that the drug remained in the blood 
and the brain and the behavioral effects it caused in 
animals. 

For the past two years, research at the Connecticut 
Mental Health Center has concentrated on the effect of 
LSD on the brain, led by George K. Aghajanian and 
Michael H. Sheard, assistant professors of psychiatry 
and both students of Dr. Freedman. They are now study¬ 
ing the specific relationships between LSD and the chem¬ 
ical serotonin, whose precise function in the brain is still 
unknown. 

It has long been recognized that LSD and serotonin 
are structurally similar, and that LSD, when injected into 
an animal, interacted with serotonin. The most recent 
finding of Drs. Aghajanian and Sheard is that a specific 
set of nerve cells in the brain release serotonin naturally, 
and the chemical then acts upon other nerve cells. They 
have also found that by stimulating those nerve cells to 
release more serotonin, the behavioral effects in rats are 
similar to the behavioral effects of injecting LSD. In 
other words, an overactivity of serotonin in the brain 
seems to result in a hyper-reaction to otherwise ordinary 
sensory stimuli, the condition found in both psychedelic 
states and in certain psychoses. 

Complementary research is going on at the psychiatric 
wards of the Mental Health Center, where Malcolm B. 
Bowers, assistant professor of psychiatry, is studying the 
breakdown products of serotonin in the spinal fluid of 
psychotic patients. His initial findings indicate that psy- 
chotics have a serotonin metabolism different from that 
of normal people. The implications of both this and the 
LSD research are far-reaching for defining the biochemi¬ 
cal correlates of certain psychiatric disturbances and 
perhaps for finding a chemical measure for the presence 
of psychosis in man. 

One highly controversial field of basic LSD research is 
the drug’s possible genetic effects. Some very limited 
preliminary studies have indicated that LSD may be re¬ 
sponsible for an increased rate of chromosome breakage 
in people who have taken the drug, a situation that could 
result in anything from leukemia to genetic defects in the 
second generation. This month a massive, year-long 
study was undertaken at the Yale-New Haven Hospital 
under the direction of Herbert A. Lubs, a geneticist and 
assistant professor of medicine, and Francis H. Ruddle, 
assistant professor of biology. The study will determine 


3 




the chromosome pattern of every baby born at the hos¬ 
pital during the year. Among the things the doctors are 
looking for are the drugs, including LSD, taken during 
pregnancy and their effect on the babies’ chromosome • 
patterns. 

In addition to exploring the chemical aspects of hal 
lucinogenic drugs, doctors have become involved in the 
psychological and social implications of large number: 
of people using such drugs. In 1962 the mental hygiene 
division of the Yale Department of University Healtl 
became aware of the fact that some of its patients wer<| 
taking one or another hallucinogenic drug. Herbert D| 
Kleber, now a staff psychiatrist at the Connecticut Men 
tal Health Center and an assistant professor of psychij 
atry, was completing his residency at Yale with a yea! 
at DUH in 1963-1964. Dr. Kleber undertook a study, o 
17 undergraduates and four graduate students who ha<| j 
used hallucinogens, to uncover the pattern of drug us j 
on campus and to trace its effects on students’ lives. 

In a report published in 1965, Dr. Kleber concluded 
“Although a number of the subjects had deep-seatei 
psychopathology, others seemed quite typical of th 
‘average’ college student at this school. Certainly th 
sample did not bear out the tendency of both the medi 
cal and lay press to label all nonmedical users of thes 
drugs as being ‘longhairs and beatnicks.’ Likewise, cori 
trary to popular opinion, it did not appear that thes 
agents were being used for ‘kicks.’ Many of the student 
. . . were looking for lasting beneficial effects that wer 
beyond the momentary experience.” 


Dr. Malcolm B. Bowers 


Dr. Herbert D. Kleber 



4 


















Dr. Kleber evenly divided the 21 students in his 
tudy into three groups: unstable students, with emo- 
onal problems that interfered seriously with effective 
motioning, whose drug use was an attempt to solve 
lese problems: stable students, relatively unconcerned 
bout emotional difficulties whose initial drug use came 
Tom their curiosity about the perceptual effects and 
rom the influence of friends; and intermediate students, 

Ivith emotional problems which were not, however, in- 
erfering with functioning. 

Twenty-four per cent of all the students under study 
vere judged to have adverse effects, including anxiety 
factions, persistent hallucinations, worsening psychi¬ 
atric symptoms and psychological habituation. The ad- 
rnrse effects tended to be limited to the unstable group. 

Forty-eight per cent of the students claimed the drug 
lad improved their lives, in interpersonal relationships, 
ncreased self-understanding, increased aesthetic appre¬ 
ciation, and a better understanding of the world around 
hem. Sixty-two per cent planned to continue drug use. 

The first study of Yale drug experimenters probably 
provided an accurate indication of the motivations for 
drug-usage and also an accurate forecast of the attrac¬ 
tion such drugs would continue to have for students. 
Two years later, because of “the current wave of un¬ 
supervised hallucinogenic drug use,” Dr. Kleber isolated 
five of the students who had had adverse reactions 
from his original 21-student study—presumably all of 
them from the “unstable” group—and published case 
studies on them. He documented the frightening delu¬ 



sional reactions that these particular students had, and 
also indicated the “serious identity conflicts” that all 
five had been suffering long before they came to drugs. 
In such cases the adverse reactions, he said “might be 
due more to the course of the pre-existing pathological 
state than to any new stress from the drug." 

Very few of the studies done on the social and psy¬ 
chological implications of psychedelic drugs attempt to 
document the positive, pleasurable claims made on the 
drugs’ behalf. Of those that have been made, most are 
inconclusive and point up the difficulties of either prov¬ 
ing or disproving the subjective benefits which LSD 
allegedly brings. 

Leonard S. Zegans, assistant professor of psychiatry, 
when he was a resident at the University of Michigan 
Medical School set out to substantiate the claim that 
hallucinogens free the imagination and enhance creativ¬ 
ity. Nineteen graduate students were tested on standard 
psychological tests for creativity, fed a dose of LSD, and 
two hours later tested again. The tests involved word 
associations; mosaic tile designs that were judged for 
imaginative use of material; free association, in which 
capacity to examine internal perceptions as well as ob¬ 
serve the external environment was tested; and ability 
to perceive figures hidden in a complicated line drawing. 

The study concluded that LSD does not improve the 
creativity of most people, except those “who had best 
handled real-life stress situations, most thoroughly and 
productively assimilated personal experiences, and had 
the least need to suppress or deny instinctual material.” 


, 



Dr. Leonard S. Zegans 



5 




In other words, LSD did not expand creativity except 
for those who appeared to be already creative and pro¬ 
ductive, who did test higher under the drug. 

Elsewhere, another experiment, much less structured, 
was conducted in non-laboratory surroundings with cre¬ 
ative artists, who reported subjectively that under LSD 
they felt more creative. Experts dismiss that experiment 
for its lack of scientific controls. 

Another Yale study also focused on pathological re¬ 
actions to psychedelic drugs, probing the unconscious 
motivations of three students, all of whom received in¬ 
tensive psychiatric care following a drug experience. 
Conducted in part by Dr. Bowers, the study involved 
clinical interviews, psychological tests, and the students’ 
own accounts of their motives and experiences with the 
drugs “in an attempt to understand the fabric of uncon¬ 
scious motivation and personality structure” of drug- 
users. 

The study found a common thread running through 
the personalities of the three students: a wish for fusion 
and merging with nature and other people. The psychi¬ 
atrists described such wishes as “unsatisfied long¬ 
ings for interpersonal closeness”; “fusion fantasies”; 
and “strong, ungratified wishes for the closeness and 
intimacy of earlier developmental periods.” They also 
saw a similarity between these feelings and those de¬ 
scribed by Kenneth Keniston as a profound sense of 
alienation among some college students. The distrust 
and lack of commitment that Keniston found in a sector 
of college students would be precisely the reasons for at 
least some of them to turn to psychedelic drugs, accord¬ 
ing to the Bowers study. 

Over 1,000 technical articles in medical journals have 
been published since the discovery of LSD. Numerous 
journalistic and pseudo-scientific articles have appeared 
in the popular press since college students discovered 
LSD. The problem remains, however, that there is still 
very little hard information on any of the aspects of 
hallucinogenic drugs—biochemical, psychological, or 
sociological. During the 1950s, experimentation was hap¬ 
hazard and disconnected; during the middle ’60s, ex¬ 
perimentation has been limited by the legal restrictions 
on access to LSD and by the moral compunctions of 
some researchers against administering the drug to 
humans. 

There is only one legal source of LSD in this country 
—a joint committee of the Food and Drug Administra¬ 
tion and the National Institute of Mental Health. Re¬ 
quests for the drug for research projects are carefully 
screened, and some scientists have reported difficulties 
in obtaining any. 


Part of the difficulty in doing research on hallucino¬ 
genic drugs lies in the problems of designing the experi¬ 
ments. Different people have enormously diverse reac¬ 
tions to the same drug, and even one person may have 
different reactions at different times. The settings for a 
drug experience may be decisive in determining the 
nature of the experience, whether it is pleasant or terri¬ 
fying. Those experiments conducted in comfortable, 
music-filled surroundings have been questioned on their 
lack of scientific controls, but on the other hand, the 
sterile atmosphere of a laboratory may militate against 
anything positive happening to someone under the in¬ 
fluence of a drug. Likewise, the mood and previous 
psychological state of a person may determine his drug 
experience, and medical studies of student drug usage 
tend to be overrepresented by the people who have 
sought psychiatric help. 

A more basic difficulty, much harder to substantiate, 
is the attitude and even the language of the researchers 
involved in LSD experimentation. Many physicians 
maintain a somewhat proprietary air toward the ad¬ 
ministration of drugs and condemn the use of drugs for 
purposes other than medical ones. Doctors talk of drug 
“abuse,” and by that they mean any use of drugs that is 
not medically supervised. When the word becomes part 
of the popular language used to talk about psychedelic 
experiences, however, it connotes everything from over¬ 
doses to giving drugs to children. In general, the language 
of psychiatry, which has necessarily developed to cope 
with deviancies and abnormal impulses, defines the 
motives for drug “abuse” mostly in terms of maladjust¬ 
ments and infantile longings. This is not to say that peo¬ 
ple who use drugs may not, in fact, be severely disturbed 
and in need of psychiatric help. It is only to say that if 
one drug-taker were not disturbed, and had a positive 
psychedelic experience, the psychiatrists would have 
little in the way of precise, scientific language to use to 
describe it. 

Sociological research into psychedelic drugs thus far 
has produced a body of largely inconclusive studies. 
Future research, moreover, rather than grappling with 
questions of drug advantages, is likely to focus first on 
the dangers of psychedelic drugs, for that is where pub¬ 
lic concern lies, that is where the researchers have the 
most extensive language and training, and that is where 
federal money and supplies of LSD will probably go. 


6 











I 


Buriram: A Different View of Medicine 


by Laura A. Smith 


S ometimes parents in Thailand must knowingly let a 
child die because of the economic and physical dif¬ 
ficulties involved in taking the child to a doctor. 

It was to this part of the world, far from the sophisti¬ 
cated diseases and treatments of urban North America, 
that I traveled this past summer. My destination was 
Buriram Hospital, situated in the middle of the arid 
plateau of northeastern Thailand. 

For a Thai, going to a hospital is not like going to the 
doctor or a clinic in the United States. It usually means 
an all-day trip by foot or the few truck-converted buses 
that bounce along the few roads—enough to make the 
strongest man feel ill. It means leaving the rice fields 
and giving up a day’s pay (ten Baht or 50 cents). If the 
doctor wants to treat, it means losing more days, paying 
replacements and thereby losing an enormous propor¬ 
tion of a meager income. For a woman, it means leaving 


The author with some young Thai friends. 



seven or eight children as well as the fields. If a child is 
sick, it is worst of all, for by custom both parents must 
leave their work to go and live in the hospital with the 
child. 

Also, before a Thai comes to a doctor, he must try 
home remedies, mainly dirt and leaves, but cow dung 
is supposedly very potent. It takes the doctor twice as 
long to clean out the cuts as to sew them up. Further¬ 
more, if they are near a larger town, the people can buy 
anything—streptomycin, chloramphenicol, diuretics, and 
other medicines from the local drugstores without a pre¬ 
scription. The druggist will tell them what to get if they 
don’t know. And finally there are the quacks who give 
the patients just what they all want—injections. Unfor¬ 
tunately these not uncommonly are followed by deep 
abscesses secondary to the unsterile needles. 

Because of these conditions, even the most acute in- 


7 



"I could do nothing to help the four-year- 
old boy who came to me with a retino¬ 
blastoma which was as large as the child's 
head . . 

“For a Thai, going to a hospital is not like 
going to the doctor in the United States . . . 

It means leaving the rice fields and giving 
up a day's pay.” 



fections are four or five days old by the time the doctor 
sees the patient. Some of my hardest moments came 
when parents would bring a child in with his eyes 
matted shut saying they had been that way for about 
five days. I wanted to scream at them: “Why didn’t you 
bring him sooner?” But then, how could they know that 
five short days would cut my chances of saving the eye 
to practically zero. 

I could do nothing to help the four-year-old boy who 
came to me with a retinoblastoma which was as large 
as the child’s head and had completely destroyed half 
his face in its six months of growth. I actually did ask 
these parents why they had waited so long to bring the 
child to a doctor. The father looked at me as if he could 


Miss Smith is a fourth-year medical student at Yale. As 
recipient of a Smith Kline &■ French Laboratories Foreign 
Fellowship, she spent eleven weeks in the summer of 1967 
at Buriram Flospital, Buriram, in northeastern Thailand. 
Previous Yale recipients of SKF Foreign Fellowships 
were Ronald A. Dierwechter, ’61, and Robert McRoberts, 
’66, both of whom worked at a mission hospital in Ganta, 
Liberia. 



not understand my question and merely said: “He is the 
ninth child. I had no time to come.” 

It is exasperating when you find acute problems too 
late to correct something which would have been re¬ 
versible, but far more amazing are the long-endured 
chronic problems. Most complaints have been present 
for two to ten years. A kidney stone can get amazingly 
large in ten years if one can really put up with the pain 
for that long, and the Thai do. A tumor is easy to diag¬ 
nose for you can see it across the room. The patient 
has been watching it grow for some time before he 
shows it to the doctor. Most Thai don’t know that tumors 
kill, and if the growths don’t cause too much pain, they 
are just lived with. 

When a patient eventually comes to Buriram Hospital, 
he can receive good care. But relatively few come. For 
Thailand, it is amazingly well-equipped, mostly thanks 
to its energetic director, Dr. Suchint Phalakornkule, who 
has acquired much American and Japanese aid, as well 
as substantial contributions from the townspeople. 

The hospital has 100 beds, but usually has about 250 
patients, some sleeping two or three in a bed, and some 
on the floor. The staff numbers six Thai doctors, all of 
whom speak English well, and I quite comfortably fell 
in as doctor number seven. In Thailand all doctors do 


8 















"About 6:30 a.m. we would load the blue 
Land Rover . . . We went bumping along in 
continual fear of being stuck in a mud 
hole.” 



everything, and I too became a general practitioner in 
the broadest sense of the term. 

My routine on several days of the week would be to 
join one other doctor in the outpatient department and 
together we would see about 150 patients. Our hours 
would be spent writing out prescriptions, sewing lacera¬ 
tions, doing pelvics, taking biopsies, checking term fe¬ 
tuses, doing circumcisions and a wide variety of other 
tasks. 

Some of the nurses had English medical, and purely 
medical, vocabularies so that they could act as inter¬ 
preters when histories were taken, and I soon acquired 
a Thai medical, and purely medical, vocabulary so that 
I could get routine histories. A physical examination in 
Thailand is seldom so subtle as to require words. 

Other days of the week I would spend with one of the 
doctors stationed on one of the three wards: men's, 
women’s and children's, and obstetrical. We began first 
thing in the morning seeing the 60 to 70 patients, finding 
out how many pre-operative cases had escaped during 
the night, writing routine hookworm clean-outs, and 
doing other indicated medical management. 

Then I went to the operating room to become general 
surgeon, neurosurgeon, or urologist depending on the 
cases for the day. Two or three operations usually filled 


"Two hours and 40 kilometers later, we 
would . . . begin to see the 100 to 300 
patients who had already begun to 
accumulate." 



out the morning and early afternoon. After that it was 
time for as many of the doctors as possible to get to¬ 
gether and by majority vote decide what the day’s X-rays 
showed. 

We made a check of the wards to see what the out¬ 
patient department had sent in for the day, institute any 
further therapy, set a few fractures and somehow, I have 
yet to understand how, stop for a glass of iced coffee on 
the way home about 4:30 p.m. 

In spite of the tremendous caseload, life was amaz¬ 
ingly relaxed, in keeping with the Thai philosophy that 
all business must be mixed with pleasure. The nurses 
are well trained in providing practically continuous iced 
coffee, a necessity in the Thai heat. I was at first, as an 
American schooled in speed, efficiency, and the neces¬ 
sity to document every move, slightly frustrated by the 
leisurely pace. But by the end of three months I had 
painlessly slowed to their pace and found the thought 
of switching back into third gear rather gruesome. 

The pace quickened markedly on Wednesday when 
part of the team took off for the smaller village public 
health clinics. About 6:30 a.m. we would load the blue 
Land Rover given to the hospital by the Japanese govern¬ 
ment with boxes of all the essential drugs and neces¬ 
sary examining equipment. Then one nurse and one 


9 











supply orderly, one other doctor and myself, plus the 
driver would start off down one of Buriram province’s 
two main thoroughfares. 

We went bumping along, covered with dust, and in 
continual fear of getting stuck in a mud hole. Two hours, 
and 40 kilometers (25 miles) later, we would arrive at 
the public health station, unload, set up shop and begin 
to see the 100 to 300 patients who had already begun to 
accumulate. The patients were the same as in the out¬ 
patient department. They had every kind of illness but 
there was one big difference: you couldn’t send them 
down the hall for an X-ray or a white count or a stool 
exam. 

Iron, vitamin B-l, Alcopar, mixture of alkali, tincture 
of belladonna, thiosulfadiozine, penicillin and cloram- 
phenicol were the main stock in trade with iron and 
vitamins leading by a long shot. And there was always 
the plea, “Please try to come to the hospital where we 
can better help you,” although we knew that few would 
ever be able to come. 

In Thailand the routine shot for diptheria, whooping 
cough and tetanus does not exist and I was soon exposed 
to the wicked triad. My first day the nurses brought in 
a small boy completely rigid with his mouth clamped 
shut. After three weeks of antitoxin and sedation the 
convulsions had decreased and he was beginning to 
show some improvement. Then, as so often happened, 
one night the parents decided that my tetanus patient 
was well enough and took him away—I don’t know 
where. Whooping cough was common and I soon learned 
to recognize the whoop. The slow-moving Thai can 
match the speed seen in any American emergency room 
when the diptheria patients arrive. Within 15 minutes 
they are rushed to the operating room, have tracheoto¬ 
mies performed, and are on their way to join the other 
children with their tracheotomies in the diptheria room. 
They don't lose very many, but I’ll stick with the DPT 
shots. 

The next lesson to be learned after the terrible triad 
is the Thai fever work-up. The key question to the 
patient is usually “where do you live?” or, freely trans¬ 
lated, “which mosquito bit you?” The diagnosis is be¬ 
tween malaria, Thai hemorrhagic fever (a dengue-like 
virus), and typhoid fever. If no malaria parasites can be 
seen on repeated blood smears, it is a matter of giving 
the patient chloramphenicol and waiting it out for 
intestinal perforation, sudden unexplained death, or 
recovery. 

Luckily, however, most patients are not this sick and 
the most common chief complaint is chronic abdominal 
pain. The first thing that must be ruled out is parasites, 


for 80 per cent of the population have them. The most 
common are the hookworms whose victims can be easily 
picked out by their marked pallor, or their hemoglobin 
level of one, two, or three grams. Luckily the hook¬ 
worms can be killed, but the patients with liver flukes 
are less fortunate: the flukes often lead to cirrhosis, 
hepatomas and a jaundiced death. The third large group, 
tapeworms, like the hookworms, can be cured; how¬ 
ever, in most cases only to be replaced by a new crop. 

If one can rule out parasites, the next best bet for 
abdominal pain is the kidney or bladder stone. These 
have usually been present for some time. The cure is 
surgical removal, and supra-pubic cystostomy for re¬ 
moval of bladder stones is the most frequent operation 
performed in Buriram Hospital. Unfortunately renal 
stones are often bilateral. Operation is also frequently 
complicated by the chronic blood loss from the involved 
kidney. Trying to get the patient’s hemoglobin above 
four grams so that we could operate was often a chore. 
I found it quite frightening to do a nephrectomy on a pa¬ 
tient with four grams of hemoglobin and only one or at 
most two units of blood available, but we didn’t lose one 
operative patient. 

Among the other patients I saw, general malnutrition 
and vitamin deficiencies were common. Beri-beri, heart 
disease and neuritis were the most prevalent, and it was 
amazing to see a bedridden, totally-crippled patient up 
and walking about after three weeks of vitamin pills. 

Tuberculosis of every organ, leprosy, snake bite, dog 
bite, rabies, abnormal deliveries, water buffalo gore 
wounds and scalp lacerations from jute knives were 
among the many other medical problems I observed in 
Buriram. 

But I never saw a patient with a stroke or lung cancer. 
The diseases of affluent civilization have not yet reached 
Thailand, and doctors there are kept busy enough with¬ 
out them. 


10 












Music and Metabolism 

T his is the time of year when chiefs of clinical serv¬ 
ices must screen hundreds of internship applications. 
If Yale’s chairman of medicine were a superstitious man 
—which he is not—he might do a little extra agonizing 
over every applicant whose name begins with B. 

Dr. Bondy’s immediate predecessor in the chairman¬ 
ship was Dr. Beeson, who was preceded by Dr. Blake, 
who in turn was preceded by Dr. Blumer; and it was Dr. 
Blake who 26 years ago wrote to Philip Bondy, then a 
Harvard fourth-year medical student, saying, “The 
chances of a place for you here are so slim that I sug¬ 
gest you apply elsewhere for an internship.” So young 
Dr. Bondy went instead to the Peter Bent Brigham Hos¬ 
pital to begin the career in which he was to become one 
of the nation’s foremost medical scientists in the field 
of endocrine and metabolic diseases. 

A native New Yorker, he was born December 15, 
1917, and grew up in suburban New Rochelle where he 
attended public schools. When he was 12 years old, 
two events of importance to his future took place. First, 
he had his appendix out at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New 
York and was fascinated by the experience. He devel¬ 
oped a strong attachment to his surgeon, Dr. Harold 
Neuhof, and decided that he too would become a doctor. 
The other significant development that year was his 
discovery of the cello. 

For Dr. Bondy, playing the cello is not simply a relax¬ 
ing pastime. “It’s participating in a creative act,” he 
points out. “Most enjoyment of the arts is passive. You 
look at paintings, read books, see plays, and the experi¬ 
ence washes over you. But in enjoying these artistic 
works you don’t help to create them as you do when 
you play music, even though someone else has written 
it.” 

He is a capable amateur cellist and is self-disciplined 
about study and practice. Since he came to Yale 16 
years ago he has played regularly in a medical school 
quartet and is currently the senior member in length of 
participation. Over the years this chamber music group 
has included medical students and fellows as well as 
faculty members. For a time two quartets existed sim¬ 
ultaneously, each having its own players for first and 
second violins and viola, but sharing Dr. Bondy who 
was cellist for both. 

The quartet plays mostly Mozart, Haydn, and Beetho¬ 
ven, but when he plays alone Dr. Bondy likes to do the 
Bach suites. There are six of them for solo cello and 
they are considered technically difficult—a challenge he 
enjoys. “Playing an instrument is something you can’t 
just pick up and drop from time to time the way you 
might, say, painting. The mechanics of making music 


Faculty Profile: Philip Kramer Bondy, M.D. 
C.N.H. Long Professor of Medicine 



are too difficult to retain without constant practice.” 
Having started cello lessons at the age of 12, he con¬ 
tinued them through high school and at college where 
he played in the Columbia University Orchestra and was 
also its manager. While at medical school he played for 
a brief time in the Boston Business and Professional 
Men’s Orchestra, but took no further instruction after 
college until 1962. That year, during his sabbatical, he 
started taking lessons again. “It’s one way to stay hon¬ 
est,” he comments. “You can fool your friends, and even 
yourself sometimes, but you can’t fool your teacher.” 

Dr. Bondy’s father, a lawyer who is practicing today 
at the age of 81, took both his bachelor’s and law degrees 
at Columbia University and it was logical that his son 
should choose the same school. There the younger 
Bondy displayed a variety of interests and talents in 
addition to music. He fenced in junior varsity matches, 
was editor-in-chief of his class yearbook, and was elec¬ 
ted to Phi Beta Kappa. With his A.B. degree, awarded in 
1938, he received the Edward Sutliffe Brainard Prize. 


11 





His decision to become a 
doctor was made when he 
was 12. 

When he started medical school his intention was to 
go into either surgery or family practice, but at Harvard 
he found himself increasingly drawn to internal medi¬ 
cine. Speaking at a meeting of the Boyleston Society, he 
attracted the attention of Dr. Fuller Albright, chief of 
endocrinology at the Massachusetts General Hospital, 
who further encouraged his interest. 

His introduction to clinical work came unexpectedly 
after his second year when he spent the summer work¬ 
ing with his old friend from the appendectomy, Dr. 
Neuhof at Mt. Sinai. “It wasn’t exactly a job,” Dr. Bondy 
recalls. “He gave me reading to do and I followed him 
on ward rounds. In the middle of the summer a flu epi¬ 
demic hit, and half the house staff were flat on their 
backs. I was put into service as a substitute intern. 
Having no clinical experience, I was treating patients 
with all kinds of disorders and the result was pretty 
much of a shambles. I made a lot of mistakes but luckily 
there were no real catastrophes.” 

Apparently Mt. Sinai Hospital approved of his per¬ 
formance in the emergency because two years later he 
was offered an internship there. But the offer came after 
he had decided on the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in 
Boston, to which he went in the spring of 1942. 

The teachers who most influenced him toward a career 
in endocrinology, he notes in retrospect, were Dr. 
Albright, Dr. George Thorn under whom he interned at 
Brigham, and the late Dr. Frank L. Engel with whom he 
worked as a resident at Grady Memorial Hospital in 
Atlanta, Georgia. His move to Atlanta in 1943 was at the 
invitation of Dr. Eugene A. Stead whom he had known 
at Harvard and who had recently been appointed chair¬ 
man of medicine at Emory University. The invitation 
was undoubtedly merited by Dr. Bondy’s qualifications, 
but a further consideration was the need for residents 
who were not about to be drafted. 

Dr. Stead had gone to Atlanta with ideas and pro¬ 
grams that were perhaps too advanced for the county 


medical society; at least this was one explanation for 
the fact that all his new appointees were drafted soon 
after they arrived. Dr. Bondy—with a lung scar resulting 
from tuberculosis and with one deaf ear—seemed like a 
completely safe bet. His draft board in Massachusetts 
had told him he had no chance of qualifying for military 
service. But the Atlanta draft board found him eligible, 
and after he had been at Grady three months he was 
inducted into the Army. During the next three years he 
served in the Medical Corps at base hospitals and Army 
general hospitals in the Southeast and was discharged 
with the rank of captain in 1946. 

Returning to Atlanta, he was appointed an assistant 
resident in medicine at Emory and started laboratory 
work on adrenal physiology with Dr. Engel. His col¬ 
leagues during that period were a brilliant and stimu¬ 
lating group. Dr. Stead had brought Dr. Paul B. Beeson 
from Harvard to be his second in command. Others on 
the staff, in addition to Dr. Engel, were Dr. John Hickam, 
now chairman of medicine at Indiana; Dr. Jack Myers, 
chairman of medicine at Pittsburgh, Dr. James Warren, 
chairman of medicine at Ohio State at Columbus; Dr. 
Abner Golden, chairman of pathology at Georgetown; 
and Dr. Ivan Bennett, a member of President Johnson’s 
Science Advisory Committee and deputy director of the 
Office of Science and Technology, who is on leave from 
the chair of pathology at Johns Hopkins. 

When Dr. Stead moved to Duke University in 1947, 
taking Dr. Engel with him, Dr. Beeson became chairman 
of medicine at Emory and asked Dr. Bondy to be his chief 
resident. The departure of Dr. Engel, with whom he had 
been investigating the mechanism of action of the ad¬ 
renal steroids, left Dr. Bondy the senior endocrinologist 
at Emory. 


The chairman of medicine at Emory University 
and his chief resident in 1949. 



I 



12 









i. 

His original interest in the adrenal glands was basi¬ 
cally scientific—what do they do and how do they do it? 
“The subject was fine for pure experimentation, but I 
wanted to do clinical research, and diseases of the ad¬ 
renal are rare. So I began to study the question of 
whether the adrenal contributes to diabetes, since 
there’s always plenty of diabetes around.” 

His main clinical experiments at Emory were on the 
mechanism by which the release of liver sugar is con¬ 
trolled. Using techniques developed by Drs. Warren 
and Stead for inserting a venous catheter directly into 
the liver, he studied the rate at which glucose is released 
from the liver in normal, diabetic, and acidotic subjects, 
and the effects of insulin on glucose metabolism by the 
liver. He also collaborated with Dr. Walter Sheldon, now 
professor of pathology at Johns Hopkins, on studies of 
liver glycogen in patients with diabetes. 

In 1948, Dr. Bondy came to Yale as an Alexander 
Brown Coxe Fellow in Physiological Chemistry and 
worked under Dr. C. N. H. Long, who had already 
achieved international recognition for his work in en¬ 
docrinology and metabolism. Eighteen years later Dr. 
Long was to see his former postgraduate student be¬ 
come the first incumbent of a chair established in his 
honor—the C.N.H. Long Professorship, which was en¬ 
dowed specifically for studies in endocrinology and 
metabolic diseases. 

Between the Coxe Fellowship and the Long Professor¬ 
ship, however, were several notable advances in Dr. 
Bondy’s personal and professional life, the first being 
his marriage to Sarah (Sally) Ernst before he returned to 
Emory in 1949. In 1951 he was made assistant professor 
at Emory. The following year, when Dr. Beeson was ap¬ 
pointed to succeed Dr. Blake as chairman of medicine 
at Yale, Dr. Bondy also moved to Yale. He became asso¬ 
ciate professor and head of the section of metabolism 
in 1955, was promoted to professor in 1961, and to chair¬ 
man of the department in 1965 when Dr. Beeson resigned 
to accept the Nuffield Professorship of Clinical Medi¬ 
cine at Oxford University. 

Dr. Bondy’s research over the years has resulted in 
important contributions in many areas of metabolism. 
He has studied the physiology of the adrenal gland, in¬ 
cluding the stimulus for production of steroids, the 
regulation of their secretions, and their metabolic fate. 
In many cases these studies required the development 
of new specific techniques for measuring the steroids 
accurately. He has also contributed much to under¬ 
standing the endocrine function of the thyroid, pituitary, 
and pancreas, not only as individual glands but as an 
integrated system. The scope of his investigations has 


ranged from study of submicroscopic particles to obser¬ 
vations involving the whole organism. 

These basic studies of the physiology of the endocrine 
system demonstrate the careful experimental approach 
that has characterized all his scientific investigation. 
The experimental laboratory data which are so essen¬ 
tial to research are constantly challenged by his clinical 
observations in the associated pathological states, as in 
the case of Cushing’s Disease. Dr. Bondy was the first to 
suggest that hormones of natural origin may, under 
certain circumstances, cause clinical problems such as 
the fever that is often referred to as etiocholanolone 
fever. While at times he has focused his attention on 
experiments involving submicroscopic elements of the 
cell, he has never forgotten nor allowed his students to 
forget that the part belongs to the whole organism. As 
one of his associates in the Department of Medicine put 
it, “The correlation of laboratory research with the care 
of the patient, so rarely observed today, is the hallmark 
of Dr. Bondy’s investigation and teaching.” 

In recognition of his distinguished research record, 
Dr. Bondy received a Research Career Award from the 
United States Public Health Service in 1962. He relin¬ 
quished the award when he became department chair¬ 
man. “Keeping up with laboratory work in biochemistry 
is a full-time job,” he explains. “I caught up a bit during 
my sabbatical year, but with teaching and clinical work 
as well as the administrative responsibilities of the de¬ 
partment, I found I couldn’t do the necessary reading. 

“It is important for a young M.D. to do research at 
the most fundamental level available when he starts, 
and to keep going for as long as possible. But few people 
can continue to be productive scientists in their late 
forties or fifties. There comes a time when the field 
moves beyond you. This is the reason people are will¬ 
ing tc be administrators.” 

In addition to his administrative duties, Dr. Bondy 
carries a full schedule of teaching and clinical activities. 
First thing every morning, except Sunday, he meets with 
the residents in medicine. On two days a week he makes 
ward rounds and on Saturday mornings he attends grand 
rounds where he often discusses the cases presented. 
He is a frequent participant in the clinical pathology 
conferences, which he attends twice a week, and he 
devotes nearly every weekday lunch hour to a confer¬ 
ence or seminar. 

In recent years Dr. Bondy has made particularly val¬ 
uable contributions by combining his medical knowl¬ 
edge with editorial skill. As editor-in-chief of the Journal 
of Clinical Investigation for five years (1957 to 1962), he 
devoted about 40 per cent of his time to editing this 


13 




major publication which represents some 2000 pages 
annually of highly technical research. Two of his col¬ 
leagues in the Department of Medicine, Dr. Franklin 
Epstein and Dr. Allan Goodyer, served as associate 
editors of the journal. 

For the past 12 years Dr. Bondy has also edited the 
metabolism and endocrinology section of the annual 
Yearbook of Medicine. He was on the editorial board of 
Connecticut Medicine from 1959 to 1962, is at present 
on the editorial board of Medicine , and has been active 
on the publications committee of the Endocrine Society 
since 1960. His book credits include associate editor for 


ciety and he is currently chairman of the Study Section, 
Program Projects, National Institute for Arthritis and 
Metabolic Diseases. 

With so much professional involvement, it is remark¬ 
able that he finds time not only for the cello but for his 
number one outdoor pleasure—sailing. He has sailed 
since he was a youngster and is distinctly partial to 
small boats. At present he is the captain of a Sailfish, 
a boat that gives more sailing per minute, he claims, 
than any other. An additional advantage is that it is 
small and light enough to be carried around on the top 
of a car. 



endocrine and metabolic diseases in the most recent edi¬ 
tion of Cecil and Loeb’s “Textbook of Medicine,” edited 
by Beeson and McDermott. 

This winter he is completing a major writing and 
editing job, the sixth edition of Duncan’s “Diseases of 
Metabolism” on which he is collaborating with Dr. Leon 
E. Rosenberg, assistant professor of medicine and 
pediatrics. 

Dr. Bondy has served in the premedical counseling 
program of Yale’s Morse College, of which he is a fel¬ 
low. His affiliations on the national level include the 
American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Ameri¬ 
can Federation for Clinical Research, the Society for Ex¬ 
perimental Biology and Medicine, the Laurentian Hor¬ 
mone Conference, and the Association of American 
Physicians, to name only a few. Last year he completed 
a three-year term on the council of the Endocrine So- 


Ta iking with a patient on ward 
rounds. Dr. Bondy is accompanied 
by Dr. Thomas Coniglione (left), 
intern, and Dr. Robert Buccino, 
senior assistant resident. 

For a number of summers Dr. Bondy and his wife 
have wandered by car around New England looking for 
interesting lakes on which to spend a day or two on the 
Sailfish. “In this way we have been able to avoid one of 
the main drawbacks of small boat sailing, the fact that 
usually you have to spend most of your sailing time in 
areas where you have sailed so often that they are bor¬ 
ing.” The Bondys have missed few major lakes in the 
northeast. They have been in squalls on Lake Cham¬ 
plain, crossed Winnepesaukee in a moderately heavy 
blow, and once got lost on a large lake in Maine when 
they took off from a motel whose name they had not 
taken time to discover. 

"A couple of summers ago, on a very quiet morning, 
we chased a loon which was fishing over perhaps half 
a mile, getting close to it when it surfaced and then 
trying to outguess it when it dived.” One of the best 


14 








things about the Sailfish, he points out, is that it can go 
anywhere. “It’s perfectly safe to take into very shallow, 
unknown water. We have been out when there was too 
much wind for other boats, and we have ghosted along 
when you couldn't see a ripple on the water. It’s the 
ideal boat for people who want variety, excitement and 
mobility. Of course, it isn’t much good for cruising—but 
we leave that for others of our colleagues.” 

For less athletic recreation Dr. and Mrs. Bondy enjoy 
the theater and attend it regularly. They have three chil¬ 
dren—Jonathan, 16, Jessica, 15, and Steven, 12—and make 
their home in an attractive modern house they built 


medical care in the most economical fashion for the 
most people. Unfortunately, the organized medical com¬ 
munity has, for the most part, been dragged along in 
these developments instead of leading them. Too often 
they say to the people who are trying to improve mat¬ 
ters, ‘You’re doing things all wrong, so we want noth¬ 
ing to do with your plans’. It is a tragedy that organized 
medicine has been so slow to accept the responsibilities 
that the nation is thrusting upon the physicians. 

“In the past twenty years or so the physician’s ability 
to cure people and protect them from disease has ad¬ 
vanced remarkably. We can’t help all people against all 



three years ago in Woodbridge. 

As a physician who is first a humanist, Dr. Bondy is 
committed to the concept that health is a human right. 
He was among the founders in 1964 of the local chapter 
of the Medical Committee for Human Rights, formed 
originally to provide medical support for the civil rights 
movement and now concerned with all social and eco¬ 
nomic aspects of health. He has been less active in the 
organization since he became department chairman but 
he strongly supports the committee's position that the 
medical community has a responsibility to participate in 
social change. 

“Changes in the patterns of health care are taking 
place because the people demand it,” he says, “but there 
is an unfulfilled need for advisors to help the govern¬ 
ment, the unions and other representatives of the people 
to work out new patterns which will provide the best 


(Left] His “good right arm” is Betsy 
Winters, administrative associate, who has 
been with the Department of Medicine 
since 1961. 

( Right] While Jon and Jessica match wits 
on the chess board, their father sits in as 
an interested observer. 


diseases but we have the knowledge to do far better 
than we are doing now. I hope that Yale will help bring 
the benefits of modern medicine to the public by study¬ 
ing the methods of delivering medical care and advising 
those responsible on how best to achieve their purpose; 
and by training medical students and young physicians 
who will recognize the social revolution in medicine as 
a challenge rather than a threat.” 


15 









An Innovation in Public Health Lectures 


B oth faculty and students shudder to remember the 
days when public health lectures were given at 
9 o'clock on Saturday mornings throughout the year 
in the Farnam Auditorium. Lecture schedules were 
changed in 1963 and again in 1964 and now all student 
lectures in the clinical years are given in the fall, at 
12:45 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. In¬ 
stead of trying to cover material dealt with in text¬ 
books the Department of Epidemiology and Public 


Health has recently been using its lecture time to look 
at the expanding edges of its field, with particular em¬ 
phasis on the impact on the practicing physician. The 
new series have been planned and arranged by Dr. Roy 
M. Acheson, professor of epidemiology and medicine. 

Last year Dr. W.J.H. Butterfield, professor of internal 
medicine at Guy’s Hospital in London, was at Yale as 
a visiting professor and gave a series of six lectures to 
a packed audience in the Fitkin Amphitheater on “The 



Dr. Edward M. Cohart, C.-E. A. 
Winslow Professor of Public 
Health and chairman, Depart¬ 
ment of Epidemiology and Public 
Health, Yale School of Medicine: 
"The Federal Government and 
Health: A Historical Review.” 


Dr. William L. Kissick, d irector 
of the Office of Program Plan¬ 
ning and Evaluation, Office of 
the Surgeon General, United 
States Public Health Service: 
"The Federal Government and 
Evolving Health Policy." 


Dr. Sven M. Gundersen, clinical 
professor of medicine, Dart¬ 
mouth Medical School: “Govern¬ 
ment Involvement in Medical 
Teaching, Research, and Delivery 
of Care as Viewed by an 
Internist." 



Dr. E. Tremai n Bradley, presi¬ 
dent of the Connecticut State 
Medical Society: “Organized 
Medicine and the Patient." 


16 















Impact of Epidemiology on the Physician and Clinical 
Investigator." 

This year the overall topic was “The Federal Govern¬ 
ment and the Physician." The speakers, shown on these 
pages with their individual topics, included Federal pol¬ 
icy-makers; physicians, both academic and in private 
practice; and a distinguished governor. Two were au¬ 
thorities on the subject from the Yale Department of 
Epidemiology and Public Health itself. 

The lectures were limited to 30 to 35 minutes and 


each was followed by general discussion, some of it 
Berkeley-lively! Again Fitkin was full, but mixed with 
the clinical students were a sprinkling from the first 
and second years, some graduate students, faculty, com¬ 
munity physicians, hospital administrators, resident 
staff, and an occasional dean. 

Excerpts from the talks will be published in the near 
future. Copies may be obtained by writing to Dr. Roy M. 
Acheson, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, 
New Haven, Connecticut 06510. 




Dr. Robert L. Berg, Albert D. 
Kaiser Professor of Preventive 
Medicine and Community Health 
University of Rochester School 
of Medicine and Dentistry: “The 
‘Ivory Tower’ and Its Surround¬ 
ing Community.” 


KarJ D. Yordy, assistant director, 
Regional Medical Programs, 
National Institutes of Health: 
“Regional Medical Programs: 
New Relationships.” 


The Hon. John H. Chafee, Gov¬ 
ernor of Rhode Island: “A 
Governor's View of Washington 
and The Physician." 









9 

1 • -> ] 

fmmS 2 




Dr. James H. Cavanaugh, director 
of Comprehensive Health Plan¬ 
ning and Development, United 
States Public Health Service: 
“The Federal Government, the 
Hospital, and the Private 
Physician." 


Dr. E. Richard Weinerman, 
professor of medicine and public 
health, Yale School of Medicine: 
“Looking Into the Future: 
Lessons to be Learned from 
Other Countries.” 






17 




















Eli Ives of New Haven and Yale 


by Gary C. Burget, M.E 


Yale medical students of the class of 1827 
commissioned Nathaniel Jocelyn to paint 
this portrait of Dr. Ives. 



T ihe custom for practicing medical men to give some 
measure of their time to university teaching is tradi¬ 
tional in this part of the country. The tradition is a 
valuable one, for there is a unique inspiration—coming 
from his daily concern for the care of a large number of 
patients—that only the practicing physician can give to 
a medical student. This paper is offered as a brief and 
informal look into the life of one of Connecticut’s earli¬ 
est professor-practitioners. 

Four men were appointed full professors to the Medi¬ 
cal Institution of Yale College when it opened in the 
fall of 1813. They were Benjamin Silliman, Jonathan 
Knight, Nathan Smith—and Eneas Munson, a respected 
New Haven physician, who was then almost eighty years 
old. Munson’s appointment as Professor of Materia 
Medica and Botany was intended for ornamentation 


only, since he declined the active duties of the professor¬ 
ship. These duties were performed by an Adjunct Pro¬ 
fessor of Materia Medica and Botany, a young New 
Haven doctor who for the next twelve years steadfastly 
did all the work of the professorship yet shared its glory 
with the aged Munson. This young physician was Eli 
Ives. 


Dr. Burget, Yale medical class of 1967, received the first 
John F. Fulton Memorial Award in the History of Medi¬ 
cine in May 1966 for this study of Eli Ives, presented 
before the Nathan Smith Club. The paper was published, 
with complete bibliographic references, in the July 1967 
issue of Connecticut Medicine. Dr. Burget is now a surgi¬ 
cal intern at Presbyterian Flospital in New York City. 


18 






( 


Eli Ives was born in 1778 into a family which was later 
to boast five generations of prominent New Haven 
physicians. His father was a doctor, a founder of the 
Connecticut Medical Society. After graduating from 
Yale College in 1799, Eli spent fifteen months as the 
Rector of Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven. Dur¬ 
ing this period he began to study medicine both with his 
father and with his father’s former teacher, Eneas Mun¬ 
son. He must have found Munson a stimulating teacher 
for in 1800 he shunned a glowing offer to become a tutor 
at Yale College and instead continued his medical edu¬ 
cation at what was then the most respected medical 
college in the country, the University of Pennsylvania. 
When, at the age of twenty-four, he returned to New 
Haven, he told his father that he wanted to set up a 
practice in some country town. His father’s lucrative 
city practice was at its height and the older physician 
apparently saw certain disadvantages in small town 
medicine, so he urged Eli to go into business with him 
for at least three months, as an experiment, to see if the 
j son could gain a foothold in New Haven. The experi¬ 
ment was evidently a success for “Young Dr. Ives,” as he 
was then called, soon left his father to open his own 
office on the south side of Chapel Street across from 
Yale College. Here he acquired a practice which was 
so large that he found it necessary to keep three horses 
to keep up his business in the town and adjacent coun¬ 
try; and that “in seasons of unusual sickness [he] hardly 
had time for the necessary sleep and meals,” according 
to a biographical notice by Henry Bronson. 

At this period the practice of medicine in New Haven 
was assuming for the first time a truly professional sta¬ 
tus. Educated medical men were uniting to better the 
standards of care and to protect themselves against the 
threat of charlatans, quacks and mountebanks. A colo¬ 
nial law of 1773 had prohibited the “practice of mounte¬ 
banks in dealing out and administering physick and 
medicine of unknown composition indiscriminately to 
any persons whom they can by fair words induce to 
purchase and receive them”; yet unreputable doctors of 
all kinds still flourished, and were a constant threat to 
' the educated physicians. In addition to this threat from 
the outside, there was considerable discord within the 
ranks of the regular doctors. Competition for patients 
was fierce. A physician called in consultation on a case 
would often use the situation unfairly to his advantage. 
Dr. Ives states, “It was not unusual at this period for 
such men as Drs. Elliot, Yale, Bird and Hurlburt when 
called upon to prescribe for a patient of another physi¬ 
cian, on their first introduction, to sweep from the 
table into the fireplace all the medicines of his brother 


practitioner, and then like Paracelsus, magnify his own 
powers as supernatural.” It is not surprising, then, that 
thirteen reputable physicians of New Haven [including 
Eli Ives and his father) met in 1803 to form the New 
Haven Medical Association “to establish the practice of 
physic in this city on a respectable footing; to enable 
ourselves to live by the profession; to promote a good 
understanding and harmonious intercourse with each 
other, to avoid the disgraceful practice of undermining 
one another by doing business for a less compensation, 
and to exclude from our communion every person who 
shall obtrude himself amoung us without a regular in¬ 
troduction, and conforming to our established rules of 
practice.” A table was attached to this list of resolutions 
establishing fixed fees for various medical services. In 
addition, arrangements were made for care of the Alms¬ 
house poor. There was no regular hospital in the city 
until the founding of the New Haven Hospital in 1826. 
The Almshouse, described as “a plain building of consid¬ 
erable size, standing in a very healthful situation,” 
probably had a small sick ward and served as a hospital 
for the destitute. A member of the New Haven Medical 
Association could contract with selectmen to attend the 
town poor. The city compensated physicians at rates 
equal to two-thirds of their normal fees: “two shillings 
for a day visit; four shillings for a night visit: one shill¬ 
ing for a puke; one do. for a purge; one do. for bleeding.” 
The New Haven Medical Association, by creating stand¬ 
ards and rules of medical practice, unified educated 
physicians and set them apart from their less reputable 
fellows as a select group. It was in this newly established 
professional milieu that “Young Dr. Ives” worked to 
make his reputation as a practitioner. 

As a physician Eli Ives rapidly gained the respect of 
his fellow doctors. After being in practice only four 
years he was elected a Fellow of the Connecticut Medi¬ 
cal Society, became a member of its examining board 
and later—at the age of thirty-two—was elected secretary 
of the society. By the age of thirty-five his reputation 
was so solidly established that he was appointed asso¬ 
ciate professor at the new medical college of Yale. 
Henry Bronson, who was Professor of Materia Medica 
at Yale during the mid-Nineteenth Century, says of Ives’ 
appointment: “It was then a great thing to be a professor. 
There were but four medical colleges in the country; 
these were in Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Han¬ 
over, New Hampshire; and the man who [on the ground 
of merit) was selected to give a course of public lec¬ 
tures, was considered high up on the professional lad¬ 
der, if not at its topmost round.” 

Eli Ives was associated with the medical school for 


19 








forty-eight years during which time his interests ranged 
from botany and horticulture to the diseases of children. 
Throughout his lifetime he was an avid student of bot¬ 
any, and, indeed, knowledge of botany was an important 
adjunct to medical treatment in this period, since many 
remedies were made from plants cultured or collected 
locally. Ives knew the plants of Connecticut perhaps bet¬ 
ter than any man of his day and had, in fact, discovered 
several new species—including a species of Asclepias 
(milkweed] “found growing abundantly on the sandy 
plains east of Cedar Hill” and a species of Gnaphalium 
(balsamweed), “first observed by me, in the company of 
Mr. C. Whitlow, ... by the margin of a brook, a few 
rods north of Mr. Whitney's gun manufactory.” A pe¬ 
rusal of Ives’ students’ notebooks—still preserved in the 
Yale Medical Historical Library—reveals that the doctor 
used his knowledge of botany to advantage in the treat¬ 
ment of disease. He recommended, among other things, 
slippery elm and sassafras for the treatment of thrush; 
arrowroot for erysipelas; juice of plantain leaves for the 
skin lesions of congenital syphilis and catnip tea and 
root of cattail flag for diarrhea. Most of these herbaceous 
remedies came from a botanical garden and hothouse 
which Ives kept on the grounds adjacent to the medical 
school. It was, in fact, remarked that the Professor “pre¬ 
scribed with a hoe from the resources of his wonderful 
botanical garden.” 

Though Ives was a careful botanist, yet he was also 
a busy clinician. In this latter role he was so talented 
that Professor Bronson says “his knowledge was almost 
intuitive.” His students apparently valued his teaching 
for their lecture notes are copious and meticulously 
kept. The following passages from the notebook of a 
Yale medical student of 1840 show that Ives’ remarks 
on many subjects were highly accurate. Considering 
thrush, he remarks on predisposing factors. 

It is most violent in feeble, debilitated children. Hence 
it may be inferred that it is a disease of debility. It fre¬ 
quently follows other diseases in adults of robust con¬ 
stitution which have been debilitated by previous 
disease. 

In his lecture on “Sore Ears” he comments quite accu¬ 
rately on otitis media. 

Under this head I shall speak of purulent discharge from 
the cavity of the ears . . . If this discharge is stopped 
suddenly fever is frequently the consequence with full 
pulse—tense bowels and fulness of the Fontanelles. 

Speaking of worms he states that “All strong purges 
should be avoided in the case of Ascaris. . . showing 
his awareness that strong irritants cause roundworms 


to migrate. In a great many instances, however, his con¬ 
clusions about disease focussed too narrowly on the 
alimentary canal as the seat of derangement. For in¬ 
stance, he recommends cathartics for the treatment of 
“Infantile Erysipelas. The Rose of the West Indies.” 

Pay little attention to the eruptions but let it be directed 
to the evacuation of the bowels. I have letters from Phy¬ 
sicians who have followed my prescriptions—not treat¬ 
ing the disease as a local one, but with cathartics testify¬ 
ing to the success of this practice. 

There are some portions of his students’ notes which 
suggest that Ives was a master of differential diagnosis. 
One imagines that he recounted the following case with 
some measure of pride. 

Case of a woman in W. Haven who was supposed to be 
in the last stage of consumption. On re-examining the 
seat and cause of the disease I discovered that she was 
cutting the 4 Dentes supientiae. After cutting the gums 
and giving some antispasmodics she recovered perfectly. | 

I 

His remarks on tongue-tie show good practical judg- j 
ment. 

I have not seen a case where it was necessary to per¬ 
form this operation. It is a very frequent notion among 
nurses that children are tongue-tied. Dr. Munson was 
called in one case to cut the fre num—he remonstrated, 
the nurse insisted—he then drew the back of his knife 
across the frenum with great success. 

Further evidence of Eli Ives’ competence as a physician 
is found in his case reports. One of these appears in the 
first issue of the Communications of the Medical Society 
of Connecticut in 1810, a case of acute retroversion of 
the uterus in a pregnant woman occasioned by jumping 
from a horse. 

September 23, 1808, Mrs. A—, a woman of 40 years of 
age, ... in jumping from a horse felt something give way 
in the pelvis; at this time she supposed hers elf to be 
about three months advanced in pregnancy. The shock 
was followed with great weakness, sensation of bearing 
down, . . . dysuria, nausea and vomitting, and all the 
train of hysteric symptoms, arising from the stomach 
sympathizing with an irritated and inflamed uterus. 

Fifteen days later Dr. Ives examined the patient and 
it is obvious from the passage that follows that he gave 
scrupulous attention to details of physical examination. 

Entering the vagina, the finger met a tumor twice the 
size of a hen’s egg, between the vagina and rectum. . . . 

A finger of the other hand was passed into the rectum, 
by which it appeared that the rectum was entirely 


20 








IJ, \ 

obstructed by the fundus of the uterus, beyond which 

[g 

the finger could not pass . . . The uterus at the same time 



1 tween the sacrum and publis . . . 

As is the case today, attempts at treatment often met 
' with frustration. 

The patient was laid upon her back, her hips raised . . . 
exertions were made to restore the uterus, until her phy¬ 
sicians were satisfied that it could not be restored in 
' this manner. The patient was placed on her knees and 
elbows and repeated trials made to restore the uterus, 
but with no better success. ... an instrument [was con¬ 
structed] made of a cylinder the size of a finger, and 
eight or ten inches in length, on the end of which a head 
was formed, by winding flax and covering it with soft 
leather, as large as could be passed into the rectum. With 
this instrument oiled and introduced into the rectum, the 
patient on her knees, the thorax lower than the pelvis, 
two fingers in the vagina and much force applied by the 
instrument and fingers, the uterus was raised above the 
brim of the pelvis. The patient was enjoined rest and a 
recumbent posture; and after the usual period of gesta¬ 
tion was delivered of a healthy child. 

There is no doubt that Eli Ives was a clever practitioner, 
yet he was probably best remembered as a teacher. For 
forty years he lectured at Yale on Materia Medica. Bot¬ 
any, Diseases of Children and “Theory and Practice.” 

I Reverend Dutton (in Ives' funeral oration) estimates that 
I he taught nearly fifteen hundred students. Henry Bron- 
1 son attended lectures at the Medical Institution in the 
I 1820’s. Years later he wrote a vivid description of the 
Professor as he appeared then. 

Dr. Ives, then nearly fifty. . . . lectured on Materia 
Medica, Botany and Diseases of Children. He was tall 
j and spare, of a weak organization, with a pleasant coun- 
i tenance and mild blue eyes, unceremonious and unpre¬ 
tending, familiar and agreeable in manners, and plain in 
dress. He had a high somewhat retreating forehead, 

! which was heavily developed above and around the 
eyes, in the region of Gall’s perceptive faculties. His 
appearance as he sat in his blue cloak with scarlet fac¬ 
ing, reading his lecture from loose papers a little dingy 
with age, his voice rusty and feeble, his elocution hesi¬ 
tating and difficult, was not prepossessing. ... At short 
intervals, unmindful of his notes, he would lean forward, 
rest his arms on the desk, and after a few preparatory 
hems, state a case, or relate an anecdote, in way of 
illustration of recreation. . . . His pleasantries were 
heralded by a certain twinkling of the eyes, and several 
extra hems which the mirth-loving of the class were 


quick to interpret. He was not a good storyteller, but his 
stories were piquant and amusing, and all enjoyed them, 
including the narrator. . . . 

Notwithstanding his short-comings, Dr. Ives had many 
valuable qualities as an instructor and gave an excellent 
practical course. ... He had treasured up in his capa¬ 
cious memory an immense store of facts gathered during 
many years of discriminating practice and thoughtful 
study, which he poured forth in unstinted measure. 

The notebooks of his students leave little question that 
the professor had a sense of humor. In his lecture en¬ 
titled “Worms,” he speaks of the treatment of tapeworm. 
For Tenia solium or Cucurbitina spirits of turpentine has 
been very successful; ... A man of intemperate habits 
took a wine glass full of the spirits of turpentine. He 
said he never was so drunk in his life. A large tapeworm 
was evacuated. 

Concerning the treatment of toothache by extraction, 
he remarks, “It is known that the sight of the instru¬ 
ments will frequently stop the pain.” Elsewhere he tells 
of a woman who accidentally set herself on fire and in 
her terror “ran down below where two elderly women 
were sitting who seeing her with her hair all burnt off 
and her clothes flaming they concluded they were come 
for and were excessively frightened.” And in his lecture 
on Flatulency he exclaims, “It is very mortifying to 
young ladies.” 

Pastor Dutton states that since the time when Ives 
had looked at his Yale College catalogue and been dis¬ 
mayed at how many of his early friends had died drunk¬ 
ards, the doctor had been a firm believer in temperance. 
Yet, in his lecture on alcohol he remarks to his students, 
“It was very early used as a remedy and sanctioned by 
divine authority. Take a little for thy stomach’s sake.” 

Though Professor Ives’ manner of teaching may have 
lacked polish, the substance of his lectures was consid¬ 
ered good. The medical students of the Class of 1827, 
out of admiration for their teacher, commissioned a 
New Haven artist, Nathaniel Jocelyn, to paint the por¬ 
trait which now hangs in the rotunda of the Yale Medi¬ 
cal Library. One gathers from this painting that here 
was a wise, yet unpretentious man. It is known that he 
always wore a certain humility; his respect for Eneas 
Munson—“whose superior talents and continued friend¬ 
ship to me, I am happy on every occasion to acknowl¬ 
edge”—seemed limitless. He appears, in the final estima¬ 
tion, to be a man who had little interest in fame, but 
sought and found fulfillment in his everyday pursuits: 
the practice and the teaching of medicine. 


21 










Y ale's Alumni in Medicine (AIM) Campaign was laun¬ 
ched early in December with the announcement 
that Dr. Leona Baumgartner (Ph.D. ’32, M.D. ’34) will be 
campaign general chairman. Dr. Baumgartner, one of 
Yale’s most distinguished medical and public health 
graduates, is being joined by an equally distinguished 
and energetic group of campaign cabinet members. 

Dr. George T. Pack (’22) of New York City and Dr. 
}. Roswell Gallagher (’30) of New Haven are campaign 
vice-chairmen. Others named to the campaign cabinet 
to date are Dr. George A. Carden, Jr. (’35), Dr. Benjamin 
Castleman (’31), Dr. William L. Kissick (’57), Dr. Charles 
W. Neuhardt (’37), Dr. Lawrence K. Pickett (’44), and 
Dean F. C. Redlich (ex officio). 

The objective of the campaign is to raise 2.5 million 
dollars as a first step in a massive long-range capital 
development program. The main program is expected to 
cost more than 75 million dollars for construction of re¬ 
quired medical school and teaching hospital facilities 
and for the implementation of new study and research 
programs. Of the 75 million-plus figure, 50.9 million 
dollars will be sought for capital facilities development 
over the next ten years. The remaining amount will be 
for endowment of professorships and scholarships. 

In the newly-launched AIM campaign to raise the first 
2.5 million dollars, support will be sought from all 
alumni in medicine for two specific areas: (1) construc¬ 
tion of a new Medical Sciences Teaching Center and (2) 
funds to increase support for teachers and students by 
a significant margin. 


Planning for the AIM Campaign last fall, members of the cam¬ 
paign cabinet met with officers and members of the executive 
committee of the Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine. 
Participants included Dean Redlich and Dr. Baumgartner (below). 



Dean Redlich, setting forth the challenge which lies 
ahead for the school of medicine, said that the projected 
Medical Sciences Teaching Center will provide an ur¬ 
gently needed element in the implementation of the new 
medical curriculum. The center will be so designed as to 
permit the student and instructor to work closely 
together, with all the facilities and equipment a student 
requires immediately available at his own work station. 


22 














Sixteen teaching modules, each having sufficient area 
and equipment to serve 16 students, will be situated in 
the building. An interlaboratory will connect the mod¬ 
ules. Space will be provided for electronic teaching aids 
to serve students individually and in groups and for 
conference and lecture rooms. Facilities will also be 
provided for study of the behavioral sciences and gross 
anatomy. 

“Despite other urgent requirements, the top priority- 
one having the greatest impact on the immediate pro¬ 
gram of this school — will be the creation of this teach¬ 
ing laboratory,” said Dean Redlich. 

With regard to the need to create new faculty teaching 
positions, he noted: “To teach superior students, an 
adequate complement of superior faculty is needed. In 
the past Yale School of Medicine has been singularly 
; fortunate in attracting outstanding teachers. Now, to 
insure that she will be able to keep those she has and 
add to their number, salary support must be strength¬ 
ened.” He also stressed that the need to provide suf¬ 
ficient scholarship and fellowship aid is of great im¬ 
portance. 

As a traditional leader in the field of medical educa¬ 
tion, Yale recognizes that “no challenge can be ignored 
nor can undue emphasis be placed on particular areas to 
the detriment of others,” according to the dean. 

“The school’s strength lies in a balanced approach in 
which the highest standards of research, teaching, and 
patient care are encouraged and properly rewarded 
within the framework of a full-time faculty,” he said. 


(Top left) Dr. Leona Baumgartner,general chairman of the campaign 
(Top right) Dr. J. Roswell Gallagher, vice-chairman 
(Bottom) Dr. George T. Pack, vice-chairman 

“Through the Alumni in Medicine Campaign, we seek 
the sanction and support of the alumni in this crucial 
phase which will have a meaningful impetus for the 
school of medicine and its continuing development.” 


23 














In and About Sterling Hall 



Japan Medicine Honors Dr. Darling 

Dr. George B. Darling, professor 
of human ecology and director of 
the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commis¬ 
sion in Hiroshima, received the 
highest award of the Japan Medical 
Association in November. The Gol¬ 
den Orchid Supreme Award, consist¬ 
ing of a gold plaque and honorarium, 
was presented to Dr. Darling for his 
“outstanding services to the promo¬ 
tion of cooperation in the field of 
medical science between the United 
States and Japan.” He is the first 
American to be so honored. 

A member of the Yale Faculty 
since 1946, Dr. Darling has been on 
leave of absence as director of the 
ABCC since 1957. The award cita¬ 
tion presented by Dr. Taro Takemi, 
president of the Japan Medical Asso¬ 
ciation, read in part: 

“Ever since he arrived in Japan in 
1957, Dr. Darling has carried out, in 
collaboration with Japanese medical 
scientists, extensive research on the 
effects of radiation from the atomic 
bomb. This is a most concrete ex¬ 


pression of American-Japanese med¬ 
ical cooperation, which in turn 
would mean a major contribution to 
the welfare of mankind.” 

Faculty Members Honored 

Dr. Morton M. Kligerman, professor 
and chairman of the Department of 
Radiology, was honored by Colum¬ 
bia University on October 27 when 
he received the Commemorative 
Medallion, established on the occa¬ 
sion of the two hundredth anniver¬ 
sary of the founding of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. The 
award was presented to Dr. Kliger¬ 
man “in recognition of his achieve¬ 
ments which have contributed to the 
stature of the university.” Dr. Kliger¬ 
man, who is currently president of 
the Association of University Radio¬ 
logists, became president-elect of 
the American Society of Therapeutic 
Radiologists at their annual meeting 
in Chicago in November. 

Dr. Howard Levitin, associate pro¬ 
fessor of medicine and associate 
dean, was saluted by the board of 




Dr. Darting receives the piaque and citation 
of the Golden Orchid, highest award of the 
Japan Medical Association. 

trustees of the Kidney Foundation 
of Connecticut in December for his 
service as chairman of the organiza¬ 
tion’s Medical Advisory Board for 
the past two years. Under his leader¬ 
ship the scientific activities of the 
foundation have been expanded and 
diversified, and annual professional 
conferences have been instituted to 
acquaint medical personnel with the 
latest developments in the renal 
field. Dr. Levitin was presented with 
an inscribed desk set at the founda¬ 
tion’s December board meeting. 

Faculty Notes 

Dr. Gilbert H. Glaser, professor of 
neurology, recently visited the De¬ 
partment of Neurology of the Uni¬ 
versity of Zagreb School of Medicine 
in Yugoslavia on a mission for the 
United States Public Health Service. 
The visit was in connection with the 
establishment of a research unit con¬ 
cerned with epilepsy. Dr. Glaser re¬ 
ports that the neurology department 
at Zagreb has an excellent, dedicated 
staff and fine facilities. While there 
he lectured on “Cerebral Ionic En- 


24 







Uronment and Epilepsy.” 

Dr. Glaser has been appointed to 
the editorial board of the Archives 
of Neurology and to the board of 
directors of the Epilepsy Foundation 
of .America. The latter is the first 
united national organization in the 
country concerned with the exten¬ 
sive problems of epilepsy in our po¬ 
pulation. 

Dr. S. Evans Downing, associate 
professor of pathology, participated 
in the seventh Conference on Re¬ 
spiratory Physio-Pathology held in 

! Nancy, France, under the sponsor¬ 
ship of the European Society for 
Clinical Respiratory Physiology in 
I September, 1967. He spoke on 
‘‘Autonomic Control of Cardiac Per¬ 
formance During Hypoxemia, Hyper¬ 
capnia and Acidemia.” This interna¬ 
tional symposium drew more than 
400 people from some thirty-six 
countries. 

Dr. Donald C. Riedel, associate 
professor of public health, is a mem¬ 
ber of the planning committee for 
the 1968 National Health Forum to 
be held March 15-17 in Los Angeles. 
The gathering, which is sponsored 
by the National Health Council, will 
bring together leaders in the health 
I professions and related fields to 
assess standards and procedures for 
assuring quality in health care ser¬ 
vices and to consider proposals for 
strengthening these standards and 
procedures. 

Two faculty members at the Child 
Study Center will carry the leader- 
; ship of the Pre-Congress Conference 
on Training of the International 
Psycho-Analytical Association to be 
held in Rome in 1969. Dr. Albert J. 
Solnit, professor of pediatrics and 
psychiatry and director of the center, 
has been appointed chairman of the 
organizing committee for the con¬ 
ference. Dr. Seymour L. Lustman, 
professor of psychiatry, has been 
named conference secretary. 

In connection with the Joint 
Commission on Mental Health of 
i Children, Dr. Lustman has been ap¬ 
pointed chairman of the commis¬ 
sion’s Task Force IV dealing with 


research and manpower; Dr. Solnit 
is serving as a special consultant to 
the Children’s Bureau; and Dr. Sally 
Provence, professor of pediatrics, is 
on the advisory group of the Re¬ 
search Division of the Children’s 
Bureau. 



Dr. Lytton 


New Chief of Section Named 

Dr. Bernard Lytton, associate pro¬ 
fessor of urology, has been named 
chief of the Section of Urology in 
the Department of Surgery. Dr. 
Lytton, a graduate of the University 
of London, has been a member of 
the Yale faculty since 1962 and was 
promoted to the rank of associate 
professor in July, 1967. 

Promotions to Associate Professor 

Recent promotions to the rank of 
associate professor to be effective 
July 1,1968, include Peter R. Hutten- 
locher, M.D., pediatrics and neurol¬ 
ogy; Robert J. Levine, M.D., medicine 
and pharmacology; and Leon E. Ro¬ 
senberg, M.D., pediatrics and medi¬ 
cine. 

Alpha Omega Alpha 

The following members of the class 
of 1968 were elected to Alpha Omega 
Alpha last October: Joseph F. An¬ 
drews, Jr., Stuart J. Brill, Rutledge 
W. Currie, Leonard E. Grauer, Peter 
Jokl, Daniel E. Keim, Marc E. Lipp- 
man, Stephen I. Marglin, Rodrigo E. 


Martinez, and Richard M. Morehead, 

Jr- 

Those who had been elected as 
third-year students in May, 1967, are 
M. Gilbert Grand, Frank E. Lucente 
(chapter president], Richard P. Mills, 
and Elizabeth M. Short. 

Visiting Professors 

Dr. Hermann Blaschko of Oxford, 
England, is currently at Yale as visit¬ 
ing professor of pharmacology. A 
fellow of the Royal Society and for¬ 
mer chairman of the University De¬ 
partment of Pharmacology at Ox¬ 
ford, Dr. Blaschko is well known as 
an authority on amine metabolism. 

Dr. Mikolaus Mani, professor of 
the history of medicine and science 
at the University of Wisconsin, has 
been visiting professor of the history 
of medicine from September, 1967, 
through January, 1968. Dr. Mani, who 
received his M.D. degree from the 
University of Basel, is a distin¬ 
guished historian whose writings on 
various aspects of medicine range 
from antiquity to recent times but 
whose special interests focus on 
Renaissance developments. 

Dr. Anna Freud will be at Yale in 
April as visiting lecturer in psychi¬ 
atry and law at the Child Study Cen¬ 
ter and the Law School. A member 
of the Psycho-Analytic Society and 
Institute in Vienna until 1938 and 
subsequently a member of the Psy¬ 
cho-Analytic Society and Institute 
in London, Dr. Anna Freud has been 
director of the Hempstead Child 
Therapy House and Clinic since 
1952. 

During the first week in December, 
Dr. George L. Engel, professor of 
psychiatry and medicine at the Uni¬ 
versity of Rochester, was the Paul B. 
Beeson Visiting Professor of Medi¬ 
cine. In addition to ward rounds and 
conferences, he gave a special lec¬ 
ture entitled ‘‘The Psychological 
Setting for Somatic Illness.” 

Special Lectures 

The tenth Grover F. Powers Lecture 
was given in October by Dr. Richard 
W. Olmsted, chairman of the Depart- 


25 










ment of Pediatrics at the University 
of Oregon School of Medicine. He 
spoke on “The Pediatrician and the 
Hearing-Handicapped Child.” 

In November, the 1967 John Pun- 
nett Peters Memorial Lecture en¬ 
titled “The Formation of Concen¬ 
trated Urine” was given by Dr. 
Robert W. Berliner, director of 
research at the National Heart Insti¬ 
tute, Bethesda, Maryland. 

The Leon E. Sample Lecture is 
being given on Tuesday, February 
6, by Dr. Francis D. Moore, Moseley 
Professor of Surgery at Harvard 
Medical School and head of the de¬ 
partment at the Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital in Boston. 

New Corporation to Aid in 
Neighborhood Development 

A new corporation has been formed 
to aid in development of the Hill 
neighborhood in coordination with 
the physical development of the 
Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 
The new organization, called the 
Medical Center Housing and Com¬ 
munity Development Corporation, 
will plan and develop housing and 
community facilities related both to 
the needs of the medical center and 
the interests of the community as a 
whole. Edward S. Gruson, an urban 
planner from Boston, has been ap¬ 
pointed president of the corporation. 

Mr. Gruson earned recognition in 
the field of urban renewal and re¬ 
gional planning as a consultant to 
the Puerto Rican government from 
1956 to 1959. A graduate of the Uni¬ 
versity of Toronto, he holds a mas¬ 
ter’s degree in city planning from 
Harvard and has done graduate 
study in biochemistry at the Univer¬ 
sity of Toronto and the Medical 
Nobel Institute in Stockholm, Swe¬ 
den. For the past two years he has 
been a consultant to the Tufts Uni¬ 
versity School of Medicine Compre¬ 
hensive Community Health Action 
Program at Columbia Point in Boston 
and Mound Bayou, Mississippi. 

The Medical Center Housing and 
Community Development Corpora¬ 
tion will strive to integrate its activi¬ 


ties with those generated in the Hill 
neighborhood as well as with the 
work being undertaken in this area 
by public and private agencies. 

House Staff Stipends and Tuition — 
Both Increase 

Alumni and particularly former 
house staff will be pleased to learn 
that the stipends for interns and res¬ 
idents at Yale-New Haven Hospital 
were increased January 1, 1968, and 
there will be a further increase ef¬ 
fective July 1. The January change 
raised interns from $4000 to $5000 
per year; new stipends for residents 
range from $5500 to $8000 per year. 

For the 1968-1969 house staff year 
beginning in July, interns will re¬ 


ceive $6000; assistant residents, first 
year —$6600, second year —$7200, 
third year —$7800; fourth year res¬ 
idents, $8400; and chief residents, 
$9100. 

The cost of a medical education, 
however, continues to rise along 
with the general inflationary spiral. 
The present $1900 annual tuition at 
the Yale School of Medicine will 
increase to $2150 as of September, 
1968. This is equal to the tuition now 
charged at many other private medi¬ 
cal schools and, incidentally, is 
less than the 1968 tuition at some 
schools. The total cost for attend¬ 
ance for four academic years at a 
privately supported medical school 
is estimated to be at least $16,000. 


Dr. Wayne O. Southwick, professor of orthopedic surgery, participates in a ribbon- 
cutting ceremony opening a new bone study laboratory at the medical center. The unit is 
a gift from the Crippled Children’s Aid Society of which Mrs. Charles W. Buehler (left) 
is president. The society was founded by a group of New Haven women in 1913 and has 
supported a variety of patient care services and research facilities in orthopedic 
problems. In addition to directing the program of teaching, research, and patient care in 
orthopedic surgery, Dr. Southwick is currently the master of Branford College, one of the 
Yale undergraduate residential colleges. He replaced Professor J. P. Trinkaus, who is on 
leave of absence this semester. 



26 









I 

l 


New Books 

THE CELL BIOLOGY OF HYDRA 
by Dr. Thomas L. Lentz, assistant 
professor of anatomy. (Interscience; 
Wiley.) The fresh water hydra has 
held considerable interest for the in¬ 
vestigation of biological phenomena 
since the pioneer studies on hydra 
were performed in 1744 by Abraham 
Trembley. This volume is primarily 
a research monograph containing the 
author’s studies and observations. 
Cell fine structure and function are 
emphasized and the cell as the basic 
structural unit is interpreted in terms 
of both its subcellular components 
and its relationship to the biology of 
the organism as a whole. 

The first chapter is a review con¬ 
taining basic information on hydra 
and material of historical interest. 
The second concerns the enzyme 
histochemistry of normal and regen¬ 
erating hydra. A chapter is also in¬ 
cluded on the histochemical local¬ 
ization of neurohumors and related 
enzymes in the nervous system. The 
fine structure of each of the six 
basic cell types is presented. Chap¬ 
ters are included that contain phys¬ 
iological experiments based on the 
cytochemical and ultrastructural 
findings and concerned with the ac¬ 
tivities of the cell surfaces, the 
digestive process, control of nemato- 
cyst discharge, and the role of the 
nervous system during regeneration. 
The final chapter summarizes the 
observations and conclusions drawn 
from this work. The book is well 
illustrated, containing a large num¬ 
ber of electron micrographs and de¬ 
tailed drawings. An extensive biog¬ 
raphy on hydra is provided. 

JARED ELIOT, MINISTER, DOC¬ 
TOR, AND HIS CONNECTICUT, 
by Dr. Herbert Thoms, professor 
emeritus of obstetrics and gynecol¬ 
ogy. (The Shoe String Press.) This is 
Dr. Thom’s fifth book on 18th cen¬ 
tury Connecticut men and their 
times. Jared Eliot, a leader in divin¬ 
ity and medicine, was also recog¬ 
nized here and abroad as a scientific 
agriculturist. As a long time member 


of the Yale Corporation, he was 
deeply involved in the affairs of Yale 
College. He was an intimate friend 
of Benjamin Franklin and shared his 
vision of a great America. Eliot’s in¬ 
fluence as a liberal in religion and 
education continued long after his 
death in 1763. The book includes 26 
full page illustrations. 

Health Education Monographs 

Health Education Monographs, the 
official publication of the Society 
of Public Health Educators, has 
appeared in an attractive new format 
under the editorship of Dr. Lowell 
S. Levin, associate professor of pub¬ 
lic health. Dr. Lorraine V. Klerman, 
assistant professor of public health, 
is associate editor of the revamped 
journal which has begun a new 
series under the heading “Review of 
Health Education Research and 
Studies Related to Health Education 
Practice (1961-1966).” 


Dr. Pepper Coordinates Plans for 
Comprehensive Health Program 

Dr. Max P. Pepper, associate pro¬ 
fessor of psychiatry and public 
health, has been appointed director 
of planning for the Comprehensive 
Health Center Program in the Hill 
neighborhood. He will be respon¬ 
sible for coordinating the work of 
two existing programs, the Hill Child 
Health Project and the Connecticut 
Mental Health Center’s Hill-West 
Haven community program, which 
he formerly directed. He will also 
develop plans for extending health 
services in the Hill neighborhood. 

Dr. Pepper, who received his M.D. 
from the University of Pennsylvania 
and his M.P.H. from Yale, has had 
extensive experience in developing 
community based health programs. 
From 1963 to 1966 he was director 
of the Mental Health Planning Proj¬ 
ect for the State of Connecticut De¬ 
partment of Mental Health. As chief 
of the Hill-West Haven Llnit of the 
Connecticut Mental Health Center 


from 1965 to 1967, he helped to orga¬ 
nize the Hill Health Council, an 
organization of Hill residents and 
health advisors who recommend the 
health care services needed. 

Workshop Considers Newborn Care 
Facilities 

Ways to reduce the infant mortality 
rate in the United States by improv¬ 
ing hospital newborn care facilities 
were discussed by a group of nation¬ 
ally known specialists who met at 
the medical school in December. The 
occasion was a workshop sponsored 
by the Perinatal Biology and Infant 
Mortality Branch of the National In¬ 
stitute of Child Health and Human 
Development, in cooperation with 
the perinatal research program of 
the Yale Department of Pediatrics. 

Approximately 50 pediatricians, 
hospital architects, and equipment 
engineers attended the three-day 
meeting. Their purpose was to con¬ 
sider the design and instrumentation 
of newborn special care units in 
the light of recent research that 
indicates a need to re-evaluate tra¬ 
ditional methods of caring for new¬ 
borns. 

Dr. Sydney Segal, associate pro¬ 
fessor of pediatrics at the University 
of British Columbia and chairman of 
the workshop, told the gathering that 
the NICHD chose to hold the meet¬ 
ing here because the Yale-New 
Haven Hospital has “the most ad¬ 
vanced facilities” for perinatal care. 
The program included a tour of these 
facilities, located in the Eleanor 
Naylor Dana Perinatal Center. The 
unit is under the direction of Dr. 
Louis Gluck, associate professor of 
pediatrics, who participated in the 
workshop. 

Speakers at the workshop in¬ 
cluded Dr. Eileen G. Hasselmeyer, 
acting director of the Perinatal Biol¬ 
ogy and Infant Mortality Branch, 
NICHD; Dr. William A. Silverman, 
professor of pediatrics, Columbia 
University; and Dr. Jerold F. Lucey, 
professor of pediatrics, University 
of Vermont College of Medicine. 


27 


Roy L. Leak, M.D. 

Dr. Roy Lathen Leak, clinical pro¬ 
fessor emeritus of psychiatry, died 
September 20, 1967, while vacation¬ 
ing in Bainbrfdge, New York. He was 
92 years of age. 

Born in Ontario, Canada, he came 
to the United States as a child and 
attended the Albany Medical College 
where he received his M.D. degree 
in 1898. His post-graduate training 
was at the St. Lawrence State Hos¬ 
pital in Ogdensburg, New York, and 
later at Matteawan State Hospital 
where he became acting superinten¬ 
dent. He was appointed manager of 
the St. Lawrence State Hospital in 
1915 and then served as clinical di¬ 
rector of the State Hospital in Co¬ 
lumbia, South Carolina, for a year 
before coming to Connecticut in 
1918. From then until his retirement 
in 1944 he was on the staff of 
the Connecticut State Hospital in 
Middletown and was its superinten¬ 
dent for 22 years beginning in 1922. 

Dr. Leak was appointed to the Yale 
medical faculty in 1919 as a clinical 
assistant in psychiatry and was pro¬ 
moted to clinical professor of psy- 

Alumni News 

1922 

GEORGE T. PACK, attending sur¬ 
geon emeritus at Memorial Hospital 
for Cancer and Allied Diseases in 
New York City, was awarded the 
Gran Cruz Placa de Plata Order de 
Duarte, Sanchez y Mella by the gov¬ 
ernment of the Dominican Republic 
this fall. In October he gave the an¬ 
nual Munroe Lecture before the Col¬ 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Saskatchewan and the Saskatche¬ 
wan Division of the Canadian Medi¬ 
cal Association;his subject was “The 
Pigmented Mole and the Malignant 
Melanoma." In November he ad¬ 
dressed the Institute for Neoplastic 
Diseases in Peru and was given the 
Condecoracion of Commander of the 
Order of Hippolito Unaue, named for 
the first Peruvian physician to re¬ 
ceive the doctor of medicine degree. 


chiatry and mental hygiene in 1936. 
He was named emeritus professor 
in 1943. 

Following his retirement, Dr. Leak 
resided in West Hartford. He is sur¬ 
vived by his two daughters. 


Everett S. Rademacher, M.D. 

Dr. Everett Stanley Rademacher, as¬ 
sociate clinical professor of psychia¬ 
try from 1947 to 1967, died on No¬ 
vember 15 last. He was born in 1899 
in New London, Connecticut, and 
received his medical degree from the 
State University of Iowa College of 
Medicine in 1923, a time when few 
medical students, indeed, opted for 
a career in psychiatry. For a year he 
remained at the Iowa State Psycho¬ 
pathic Hospital, one of only a hand¬ 
ful of university-affiliated psychia¬ 
tric institutions then extant in this 
country. He continued his training 
at the Institute for Juvenile Research 
in Chicago and then joined the 
Cleveland [Ohio] Child Guidance 
Clinic. In 1928 he returned to Con¬ 
necticut to become director of the 
Bridgeport-Waterbury Child Guid¬ 
ance Clinic and also was appointed 
clinical instructor in psychiatry and 



1925 

THOMAS FRANCIS, Jr. Henry Sew- 
all University Professor of Epidemi¬ 
ology at the University of Michigan, 


mental hygiene at the Yale Schoc 
of Medicine. In 1933 he began pr 
vate practice in New Haven and be 
came the highly trusted consultan 
and faithful friend to his medica 
and surgical colleagues. He alsi 
served as consultant to many com 
munity agencies and to the Bristo 
Family Service for twenty-one years 
Promoted to associate clinical pro 
fessor in 1947, he also became the 
first psychiatric lecturer in the Yah 
Department of Public Health. 

During World War II he served 
for four years with the Coast Guard 
as senior surgeon in the United 
States Public Health Service. Besides 
having authored a number of profes¬ 
sional articles, Dr. Rademacher alsoi 
was an avid poet; his The Psychia -1 
trist Sings — Sonnets on Psychiatry 
and Other Poems was published in 
1949 by Winthrop Press. He was 
married to Grace H. Corwin of River- 
head, Long Island, whom he fol¬ 
lowed in death by only six weeks. 
The New Haven medical community 
joins their three daughters in mourn- 
ing the loss of an esteemed friend 1 
and colleague, as will the m-any pa- j 
tients whom he served long and 1 
well. — S. F. 


was given the Outstanding Civilian ; 
Service Award while attending the i 
annual meeting of the Commission j 
on Influenza of the Armed Forces , 
Epidemiological Board on November 
14. This award was established by 
the Secretary of the Army to recog¬ 
nize outstanding performance of 
those who serve in an advisory 
capacity. The award recognizes more 
than twenty-five years of service by 
Dr. Francis as a member and director 
of the Commission on Influenza, as 
former member and president of 
the Armed Forces Epidemiological 
Board, and as a consultant to the 
Army on many disease problems 
from World War II to the present. 

The citation reads in part; “Dr. 
Francis’ belief that preventive medi¬ 
cine is the key to building and con¬ 
serving vigorous military forces was 


28 



















j 

I 

I 


reflected in his many valuable and 
1 outstanding contributions for pre¬ 
vention of military manpower losses. 
e His dedication, patriotism, and loy- 
%lty deserve the highest praise.” 
all In addition to his service with the 
sc military forces, Dr. Francis has ser¬ 
ved on many research advisory 
, boards for governmental and private 
. agencies. He is a member of the 
American Philosophical Society, the 
American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, and the National Academy 
E of Sciences. He has been president 
of the American Society of Micro- 
: biologists, the American Association 
: of Immunologists, the American So¬ 
briety for Clinical Investigation, and 
i the American Epidemiological So- 
. ciety. In 1954 and 1955, he conducted 
the large field trial of poliomyelitis 
vaccine, which established the ef¬ 
fectiveness of the Salk inactivated 
vaccine. His work in the field of 
respiratory diseases, especially in¬ 
fluenza, has led to other awards and 
recognition. 

1930 

“J. Roswell Gallagher Day,” held in 
Boston on September 29, featured a 
scientific symposium, reception, and 
dinner honoring Dr. Gallagher, who 
recently retired from the Harvard 
i medical faculty. He was the founder 
of the Adolescents’ Unit at the Chil¬ 
dren's Hospital Medical Center and 
headed the unit for more than 15 
years. At the symposium in his 
honor, papers were presented by 
several authorities in adolescent 
j medicine. The guest speaker at the 
dinner was Dr. Dana L. Farnsworth, 
director of University Health Ser¬ 
vices at Harvard, whose topic was 
“Growing Young With Ros Gal¬ 
lagher.” As of September 1, 1967, 
Dr. Gallagher became a clinical pro¬ 
fessor of pediatrics at Yale. 

1932 

MYRON E. WEGMAN was one of 
three leaders in the health field to 
receive a 1967 Bronfman Prize from 
the American Public Health Associa¬ 
tion in October. “Educator, diplomat, 
clinician, and humanitarian” was the 
way the citation described the dean 
of the University of Michigan School 
of Public Health, who was formerly 
secretary-general of the Pan Ameri¬ 
can Sanitary Bureau. The $5000 


award and crystal cube was awarded 
for “creative work ... in the better¬ 
ment of community health.” In a re¬ 
cent letter, Dr. Wegman noted: “In 
responding to the citation I had a 
chance, once more, of telling how 
much I owe to Grover Powers for 
whatever I have done.” 

1937 

MARGARET DANN retired from 
the faculty of Cornell University 
Medical College in June 1967. She 
is now living in Martinsville, Vir¬ 
ginia. 

1938 

JOHN PRUTTING is president of 
the Foundation for the Advancement 
of Medical Knowledge. He partici¬ 
pated in a symposium on “Medical 
Progress and the Post-Mortem” pre¬ 
sented by the Foundation at the New 
York Academy of Medicine in Octo¬ 
ber. 

1940 

In a recent letter to JAMES SMITH, 
class agent, JACK BLAISDELL 
wrote: “Famie and I have recently 
moved to Laguna Beach, which is 
the Riviera of the West, but my 
practice is still principally in Santa 
Ana about 30 minutes away on the 
freeway. Our oldest boy, Christo¬ 
pher, who was born during our 
senior year at medical school, is now 
in his second year of law school 
having finally made up his mind 
what he wants to do with himself. 
Next in line is our daughter Jan who 
is now Mrs. John Henry Porter, III. 
She is not only a housewife but is 
teaching school near Providence, 
Rhode Island, having graduated in 
1965 from Sarah Lawrence College. 
Our younger son Nicholas is cur¬ 


rently attending graduate school at 
U.C.L.A. where he is majoring in 
ceramics and the history of art. I 
am sorry that I cannot report the 
appearance of any grandchildren but 
all three are married so Famie and 
I have high hopes.” 

PAUL D. MACLEAN is the author 
of an interesting article entitled “The 
Brain in Relation to Empathy and 
Medical Education” in the May 1967 
issue of The Journal of Nervous and 
Mental Disease. This paper is based 
on a talk which he gave at the Yale 
School of Medicine Alumn-i Day 
program in June 1965. 

1943 (March) 

In February 1968 ROCKO M. FASA- 
NELLA will participate in a sympo¬ 
sium on cataract surgery at the Wills 
Hospital in Philadelphia. He will also 
serve as moderator of a discussion 
of complications in eye surgery in 
Trinidad and will be a guest speaker 
on ptosis surgery in Bogota, Colom¬ 
bia. 


Dr. Rowland 

1948 

LEWIS P. ROWLAND moved to 
Philadelphia this fall to assume his 
new post as chairman of the Depart¬ 
ment of Neurology at the University 
of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 
He was previously professor of neu¬ 
rology at Columbia’s College of 
Physicians and Surgeons. The new 
chairman has an impressive research 
record. His approach to neurological 
disease is biochemical and deals 
with genetic errors in the biochem¬ 
istry of the nervous system. His 
current work is concerned primarily 
with diseases affecting the muscles. 



Dr. Wegman 



29 








1950 

SIDNEY S. LEE, associate dean for 
hospital programs at Harvard Medi¬ 
cal School, has been appointed clini¬ 
cal professor of hospital and medical 
care administration at the Harvard 
School of Public Health. 

1951 

ROBERT N. HAMBURGER has been 
promoted to the rank of professor in 
the Department of Pediatrics at the 
University of California School of 
Medicine in San Diego. 



1956 

THOMAS F. FERRIS has become as¬ 
sociate professor of medicine and 
director of the Division of Renal 
Disease at the Ohio State University 
in Columbus. He had been a member 
of the Yale faculty since 1963 and 
had spent the 1966-67 academic year 
on leave of absence at Oxford Uni¬ 
versity as a visiting investigator in 
the Regius department and doing 
clinical work in Dr. Paul Beeson’s 
Nuffield Department of Medicine. 

1957 

CLIFFORD B. REIFLER has been 
promoted to assistant professor of 
psychiatry at the University of North 
Carolina School of Medicine. He is 
also associate university physician 
in charge of psychiatric services in 
the Student Health Service. Before 
joining the University of North Caro¬ 
lina medical faculty in 1963, he was 
a research psychiatrist in the Aero¬ 
space Medical Research Laboratory 
at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base 
in Ohio for two years. 


1959 

JOHN C. MARSH is now on the Yale 
faculty as assistant professor of 
medicine and pharmacology. 

1960 

THOMAS L. LINCOLN has joined 
the staff of the Rand Corporation in 
Santa Monica, California. He wrote 
recently to say, “I have changed 
coasts and formal affiliation, but I 
have not changed my focus of activ¬ 
ity: studying the impact of modern 
biological science and technology on 
health management and medical de¬ 
cision making. Clearly I think that 
Rand offers some special advantages 
besides the salt air, the sun, and the 
sea — in particular, an eclectic and 
interdisciplinary attitude with rigor¬ 
ous cross-criticism.” His special in¬ 
terests are urban affairs, civil rights, 
and patient care. 

1961 

RONALD DIERWECHTER, his wife, 
Jewell, and their children, Tatiana 
and Yonn, have returned to the Mis¬ 
sion Methodiste in Il-Maten, Algeria, 
after a summer in the United States. 
In a recent newsletter from Il-Maten, 
Mrs. Dierwechter wrote: “On a hill 
far away stood a brand-new hospi¬ 
tal, equipped and staffed, but no 
doctor . . . and so I am presently 
writing from that hill, having re¬ 
turned to that hospital, and having 
been greeted, received, cous-cous- 
ed, and feted by that waiting staff.” 
Anyone interested in borrowing a 
set of ten photographs of the hospi¬ 
tal to acquaint people with this pro¬ 
ject should write to the Dierwech- 
ters at Mission Methodiste, Il-Maten 
(Setif), Algeria. 

ROBERT M. LIVINGSTON reports 
that he has recently been certified 
by the American Board of Obstetrics 
and Gynecology. 

JOHN V. WEIL returned to New 
Haven in July as a second year resi¬ 
dent in internal medicine. The Weils 
have one daughter, Anne Hart, born 
in July 1966. 

1962 

ELIZABETH ULMAN KOENIG 
writes to announce the birth of their 
first child, a daughter named Kathe¬ 
rine Lee, on November 23, 1967. The 
Koenigs plan to move to Bethesda, 
Maryland, in February 1968. 


1963 

DAVID F. CROSS is now a lieuten¬ 
ant on active duty with the Navy 
assigned to the Station Hospital at 
the U.S. Naval Station in Argentia, 
Newfoundland. 

HAROLD P. KAPLAN returned to 
Yale-New Haven Hospital in July as 
a second year assistant resident. He 
was previously at the Aeromedical 
Research Laboratories at Wright- 
Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. 

1964 

JOSEPH CURI and his wife have 
announced the birth of a daughter, 
Anne Josephine, on August 16, 1967. 

1965 

MOHANDAS M. KINI is currently 
an assistant resident in ophthal¬ 
mology at the Massachusetts Eye 
and Ear Infirmary. After completing 
his internship at the Montreal Gen¬ 
eral Hospital, he worked as a solo 
general practitioner for over a year 
in Bell Island, a community of 8,000 
people in Newfoundland before re¬ 
turning to Boston to begin his resi¬ 
dency training. 

1966 

JAMES E. BROWN completed his 
internship at Cleveland Metropolitan 
General Hospital and is now a first 
year assistant resident in internal 
medicine at Yale-New Haven Hospi¬ 
tal. 

ELI H. NEWBERGER and his wife 
have announced the birth of a 
daughter, Mary Helen, on October 
2, 1967. 

HOUSE STAFF 
1935 

ROBERT A. PHILLIPS has received 
the 1967 Albert Lasker Clinical Re¬ 
search Award “in recognition of his 
enormous contribution to the under¬ 
standing of the mechanism of death 
in cholera, and the development of 
a life-saving method of treating it.” 
The citation notes: “Dr. Phillips’ re¬ 
search and leadership are responsi¬ 
ble for the reduction in cholera from 
a death rate of over 60% in formerly 
untreated cases, to a death rate of 
less than 1% in cases treated by his 
method ... As a result of his field 
studies, conducted during the past 
ten years in the Far East, Dr. Phillips 
observed that the chief killing ele- 


30 




5 


1950 

DAVID W. MOLANDER lectured 
on “Newer Methods of Treatment of 
the Malignant Lymphomas and Leu¬ 
kemias" at the medical congress held 
in Santo Domingo, Dominican Re¬ 
public, in October 1967. He was 
decorated with the Order of Cristo¬ 
bal Colon at a reception held in the 
National Palace. Dr. Molander is on 
the staff in internal medicine of the 
Pack Medical Group in New York 
City. 

1963 

CARL DUBOVY began private prac¬ 
tice of allergy with the Community 
Medical Group in Boonton, New 
Jersey, this past July. In October he 
was elected to membership in the 
New Jersey State Chapter of the 
American Academy of Pediatrics. He 


is also a member of the American 
College of Allergists and the Ameri¬ 
can Academy of Allergy, and a 
fellow of the American Association 
of Clinical Immunology and Allergy. 

PUBLIC HEALTH 
1940 

M. J. PLISHNER and ARTHUR B. 
ROBINS f’42J are co-directors of a 
Public Health Service emphysema 
detection and prevention project. 
The joint project is administered at 
the Queensboro Tuberculosis and 
Health Association by the executive 
director, M. J. Plishner, and at 
the Queens Hospital Center by Dr. 
Robins, who is director of Ambula¬ 
tory Patient Services in the Pulmo¬ 
nary Medical Division of the Queens 
Hospital Center-Long Island Jewish 
Hospital Affiliation. 

1946 

PAULINE SAVAGE FLETCHER has 
moved from Arizona to Los Angeles, 
California, where she is employed 
as supervisor of nursing services, 
University of California College of 
Medicine at Irvine. 

1948 

HOWARD W. ENNES, JR. has been 
named a special consultant to the 
Community Health Action-Planning 
Program of the Health Insurance 
Council, New York City. He will 
serve in this new position on tem¬ 
porary assignment from the Equit¬ 
able Life Assurance Society of the 
United States where he is assistant 
vice-president and director of com¬ 
munity services and health educa¬ 
tion. 

LUIS A. GALLARDO has been ap¬ 
pointed as the under-secretary of 
health for the Ministry of Public 
Health of Bolivia. Prior to this ap¬ 
pointment he was in charge of opera¬ 
tions and planning in the Ministry. 
While holding this position he took 
some postgraduate work in health 
planning at the University of San¬ 
tiago, Chile. 

JOSEPH H. GERBER has retired 
from the U.S. Public Health Service 
and has moved to the island of Guam 
where he has accepted an appoint¬ 
ment as health officer of Guam. 
HIRAM SIBLEY is the executive 
director, hospital planning for metro¬ 



ment in cholera is the dehydration 
of the victim. He devised a method 
of replacing the body fluids, salts, 
and other chemical compounds, 
called electrolytes — which are nec¬ 
essary to various physiological pro¬ 
cesses essential to life, and which 
are lost by the victim in the course 
of the disease — so as to bring the 
body chemistry into balance. This 
life-saving therapy of rapidly replac¬ 
ing, intravenously, these lost body 
fluids and compounds is so simple 
that it can be successfully admin¬ 
istered in the field, even under the 
, most elementary conditions, and 
1 even by relatively unskilled person¬ 
nel." Dr. Phillips has been director 
of the Pakistan-SEATO Cholera Re¬ 
search Laboratory, Dacca, East Pak¬ 
istan, since he retired from the Navy 
Medical Corps in November 1965. 


Dr. Phillips 


politan Chicago. He has also been 
named secretary-treasurer, Associa¬ 
tion of Area Wide Health Planning 
Agency. 

1949 

JOHN P. LAMB, JR. has been ap¬ 
pointed dean, College of Health, East 
Tennessee State University, Johnson 
City, Tennessee. 

WILLIAM B. PARSONS has been 
named chief, Program Assistance 
Branch, Division Allied Health Man¬ 
power, U.S. Public Health Service 
in Washington, D.C. 

1950 

CHARLES H. OKEY is the director 
of Public Health Laboratories, Maine 
Department of Health and Welfare, 
with offices in Augusta. 

1951 

JOSEPH AXELROD, formerly with 
the Montefiore Hospital, New York 
City, has been named planning ad¬ 
ministrator for the Department of 
University Health at Yale. 

ROBERT L. JOHNSON is the vice- 
president for student affairs, Univer¬ 
sity of Kentucky in Lexington. 
MARIANA B. MIJARO is a regis¬ 
tered nurse on the staff of the Pas¬ 
saic General Hospital in New Jersey. 
Prior to this position, she was nurse- 
instructor in communicable diseases, 
Manila Health Department in the 
Philippines. In 1963 she came to the 
United States as an exchange nurse 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for 
one year and then transferred to 
New Jersey where she worked in 
obstetrics and pediatrics. She re¬ 
turned to the Philippines in 1964 and 
in 1966 returned to the United States. 
1953 

SHIRLEY L. HANDLER announces 
the birth of a son, Jonathan Isaac, 
on July 12, 1966. 

1955 

FRANCES R. OGASAWARA has 
been promoted to coordinator, Tu¬ 
berculosis Program, National Tuber¬ 
culosis Association, New York City. 
NGUYEN-VAN-THO writes that he 
was appointed Secretary of State for 
National Education in Viet Nam in 
November, 1966. He has found the 
experience “a very difficult and ex¬ 
hausting task, trying to hold down 
the Government position and at the 
same time to keep up my dental pro- 


31 




fession. It has been a hard year but 
truly I did enjoy my work, both pro¬ 
fessionally and politically, for it was 
quite a challenge.” 

1958 

JOSEPHINE A. CIPOLLA is the 
nursing coordinator with the New 
York Telephone Company. Her of¬ 
fice is in New York City. 

1965 

MONTE N. FRAIZER was promoted 
to professor of animal diseases at 
the University of Connecticut in 
October 1967. 

1966 

NANCY P. ALFRED is assistant to 
the dean at Mount Sinai School of 
Medicine in New York City. Miss 
Alfred is also assistant in the Depart¬ 
ment of Community Medicine. 


Dr. Nassif 

RAIF E. NASSIF has been named 
director of the School of Medicine, 
American University of Beirut in 
Lebanon. He will be dean of a school 
that has over 200 students from Asia, 
Africa, Europe, and the western 
hemisphere. This is one of the fore¬ 
most medical schools in the Middle 
East. Dr. Nassif was on the Ameri¬ 
can University of Beirut faculty from 
1950 to 1953 as an instructor in 
bacteriology and laboratory scien¬ 
ces. He held a fellowship in clinical 
pathology at the University of Penn¬ 
sylvania in 1954. Following his year 
of study in Philadelphia, he was ap¬ 
pointed assistant chairman of the 
Department of Clinical Pathology 
and was promoted to chairman in 
1957. Dr. Nassif is a Chevalier in the 
Lebanese Order of Cedars, an honor 
bestowed on him by the government 
of Lebanon for his work as chairman 
of the 1960-61 Middle East Medical 
Assemblies. 


A limited number of copies of the 
C.-E.A. Winslow Lecture “Current 
Medical Care Problems’’ presented 
by Dr. Karl Evang on the occasion 
of the dedication of the Laboratory 
of Epidemiology and Public Health 
in April 1965 are available upon 
request. Distribution will be made as 
long as the supply lasts. Anyone 
wishing a copy of this lecture should 
send their request to: 

Eric W. Mood, Secretary-Treasurer 
Yale Alumni in Public Health 
Yale University School of Medicine 
333 Cedar Street 
New Haven, Connecticut 06510 


Picture Credits Robert Perron: cover, in¬ 
side cover, pp. 4, 5, 11, 14, 15 (left), 17 
(right); Sedat Pakay: p. 3; Laura A. Smith: 
pp. 8, 9; Reeves Studio: p. 12; Philip K. 
Bondy, M.D., p. 15 (right); A. Burton 
Street: pp. 16, 17, 22, 26; Yale University 
Art Gallery: p. 18; Morris Warman: p. 23 
(top left); Charles Alburtus, Yale Univer¬ 
sity News Bureau: p. 23 (below), 25; Fabian 
Bachrach: p. 28; Benyas-Kaufman: p. 29; 
Paul Elliott Blumenthal: p. 29 (right). 


RUDOLPH V. SELLERS has been 
appointed instructor and health edu¬ 
cator in the Tufts University Depart¬ 
ment of Preventive Medicine and is 
a staff member in the Tufts Univer¬ 
sity Columbia Point Health Center 
in Dorchester, Massachusetts. 

1967 

CHARLES J. PETRILLO, JR. has ac¬ 
cepted an appointment as a commis¬ 
sioned officer in the U.S. Public 
Health Service. A public health 
economist, he has been assigned to 
the Injury Control Program in the 
National Center for Urban and In¬ 
dustrial Health, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



32 








The new Yale medical curriculum has 
been approved by the school’s Board of 
Permanent Officers, and the first year 
will be implemented with the students 
entering in the fall of 1968. A discus¬ 
sion of this new curriculum will ap¬ 
pear in the next issue of Yale Medicine. 







YALE MEDICINE 

333 Cedar Street 
New Haven, Conn. 06510 




NON-PROFIT ORG. | 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 


New Haven, Conn. 
Permit No. 8 




MARK YOUR CALENDAR 







YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE/SPRING 1968 






COVER: The owl and the torch, symbols of wisdom and knowledge over the entrance 
to Sterling Hall of Medicine, are familiar to all alumni. Inscribed below are the words 

AAMTIAAIA EX0NTE2 AIAAS220T2IN AAAHA0I2 

from Plato's Republic. The inscription may be translated “Those who carry torches 
will pass them on to others." 











' 


YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE/SPRING 1968/VOL. 3 NO. 2 


Contents 


The New Curriculum 

2 

Yale and The ABCC 

7 

AIM Campaign 

11 

Ex Libris 

14 

West to the East by Bernard D. Beitman 

16 

Internship Appointments 

22 

Yale Alumni Seminar, 1968 

23 

In and About Sterling Hall 

24 

Alumni News 

27 

YALE MEDICINE is published three times a year — in the fall, winter, and 
spring — and is distributed to members of the Association of Yale Alumni in 
Medicine, students, and others interested in the School of Medicine. Com¬ 
munications may be addressed to The Editor, Room L200, 333 Cedar Street, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 06510. 


Editor Arthur Ebbert, Jr., M.D. 

Managing Editor Kate Swift 

Assistant Managing Editor Brenda M. Large 

Designer Sarah P. Sullivan 

Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 
Benjamin Castleman, M.D., ’31, President 
George A. Carden, Jr., M.D., ’35, Vice-President 
Robert F. Bradley, Jr., M.D., ’43, Secretary 
Lawrence K. Pickett, M.D., ’44, Past President 

Executive Committee 
Philip S. Brezina, M.D., ’40 
Jonathan T. Lanman, M.D., ’43 
Louis E. Silcox, M.D., ’35 
Richard D. Otis, M.D., ’49 
Eric W. Mood, M.P.H., ’43 
William B. Kiesewetter, M.D., ’49hs 







The New Curriculum 



2 


































































T he class of 1972, entering medical school at Yale 
this September, will be the first to take part in a 
new program of medical education that has been more 
than three years in the planning. The Committee to Re¬ 
evaluate the Goals of Medical Education and Their Im¬ 
plementation at Yale began a thorough study in 1965 
under the chairmanship of Dr. Byron H. Waksman, pro¬ 
fessor of microbiology. Among the recommendations of 
the Committee was that a new office of Associate Dean 
for Curriculum be established. Dr. Howard Levitin, as¬ 
sociate professor of medicine, was named to the new 
post in the autumn of 1966 and worked closely with the 
Curriculum Committee, chaired by Dr. Edward A. Adel- 
berg, professor of microbiology and molecular biophys¬ 
ics, to develop the new curriculum that has now been 
approved by the Board of Permanent Officers. On the 
following pages Yale Medicine presents some questions 
regarding the new curriculum to the associate dean. 
The interview is followed by recommendations from 
the Report of the Curriculum Committee. 

Why was it felt by the Curriculum Committee, and in¬ 
deed by the faculty in general, that a curriculum re¬ 
vision was appropriate at this time? 

Dr. Levitin: The present curriculum, which has been in 
j effect at Yale for many years, exposes all of the stu¬ 
dents to a similay program, and does not allow individ- 
! ual planning. It was felt that a new curriculum could be 
designed which would meet the needs of contemporary 
medicine, and that this new program should be a truly 
flexible program. It should allow the student to study at 
his own pace, to explore in depth areas of his own in¬ 
terest, and to pursue an individualized program which 
will be a firm foundation for his ultimate career in 
medicine. 

What are the key features of the new curriculum? 

Dr. Levitin: I would characterize the key features as 
follows: 

1. A modest reduction in the initial time devoted to the 
study of basic sciences. 

2. The early introduction of the student to clinical medi¬ 
cine. 

3. The opportunity to study advanced basic science fol¬ 
lowing clinical clerkships. 

4. A flexible program during the last one and a half 
years which allows the student to plan his own curricu¬ 
lum in consultation with his advisors. 

5. A continuing outpatient clinic experience extending 
over a relatively long period. 


How do you accomplish the early introduction of the 
student to clinical medicine? 

Dr. Levitin: The new curriculum will require a student 
to spend six weeks of his first summer in a clinical 
setting. By a clinical setting we do not necessarily mean 
the traditional hospital experience as a clinical clerk, 
but rather a variety of clinical experiences available in 
contemporary medical practice. These will include ap¬ 
prenticeship to a private practitioner, affiliation with a 
group practice, work in a community health project, 
and any other clinical activity that will give the student 
a first-hand involvement with a doctor delivering good 
medical care to a patient. In order to prepare the stu¬ 
dent for this clinical experience during the first sum¬ 
mer, we have arranged the courses of the first year to 
include those considered prerequisite to clinical studies; 
these courses include introduction to clinical medicine, 
laboratory medicine, and some pathology and pharma¬ 
cology. He will, in addition, have had courses in per¬ 
sonality development, psychopathology, and epidemiol¬ 
ogy and public health. 

In the present program the student is frustrated by 
the two-year delay between his arrival in medical school 
and his initial involvement with the clinical situation. 
There is no doubt that this early clinical experience will 
have a marked impact on his studies of both basic sci¬ 
ence and clinical medicine during the remaining three 
years of his medical education. 

Would you comment on the advantage of returning to 
basic science studies following the clinical clerkships? 

Dr. Levitin: During the first two years of the current 
program the student fails to appreciate the important 
role that basic science ultimately will play in his under¬ 
standing of clinical medicine. It is not until his third 
and fourth years in clinical medicine that the important 
relationship of basic science to contemporary medicine 
becomes apparent. Our present students and recent 
graduates who have been questioned about this have 
indicated they would have welcomed the opportunity 
to restudy basic science, approaching this body of ma¬ 
terial at a more advanced graduate level with the so¬ 
phistication gained by previous clinical experience. 
During the last one and a half years of the new program 
the student will have the opportunity to select courses 
in advanced basic science, which he and his advisor 
feel are appropriate to his chosen career. These courses 
will follow required clinical clerkships and will be 
studied with a new perspective gained by clinical ex¬ 
perience. 


3 





Could you elaborate on the flexible program during the 
last one and a half years? 

Dr. Levitin: This is perhaps the most exciting aspect of 
the new curriculum. Two important things have hap¬ 
pened in medical education. First, the amount of in¬ 
formation that justifiably can be included in the cur¬ 
riculum has increased enormously, and second, there are 
new career opportunities available in medicine which 
require training in new disciplines. The present cur¬ 
riculum limits the ability of the student to become 
adequately prepared for his chosen career. In this new 
program—which we call the “multiple-track system’’— 
the student will be able to plan, during the final year 
and a half, a curriculum which is designed to meet his 
particular objectives. 

I am talking about the increasing number of young 
physicians who are going into the health delivery ser¬ 
vices, the field of biomedical engineering, medical eco¬ 
nomics, space medicine, medical legislation, and medical 
jurisprudence. It would be impossible to cram the 
courses necessary to prepare an individual for a career 
in these fields into the already crowded four year cur¬ 
riculum. The flexible aspect of our program will allow 
the student to make a career commitment and plan a 
program which adequately prepares him, without jeop¬ 
ardizing the ability of other students, to pursue equally 
important careers in the field of their choice. Any at¬ 
tempt to distribute the total body of knowledge would 
only dilute the amount of material any one candidate 
could master and leave him inadequately prepared for 
his career. 

It is important to emphasize that the goal of the mul¬ 
tiple-track system is not to develop specialists at an 
earlier stage, if we define specialization as the acquisi¬ 
tion of technical competence. It is our goal instead to 
expand his training with courses and clinical experience 
which will enhance his potential to make significant 
contributions to his chosen field of medicine. 


Tell us more about a long term outpatient clinic expen 
ence. 

Dr. Levitin: Under the present program the student ha 
an eleven or twelve week assignment in the outpatien 
clinic. During this time he becomes acquainted with 
moderate number of patients but sees them over a rela 
tively short period and does not have the opportunit; 
to see the effects of long term treatment. Nor does hi 
become involved in a significant doctor-patient rela 
tionship which can only be the product of long tern 
care. Under the proposed program the student will ac 
quire clinical experience working in an outpatient clinic 


one half day once a week and will follow a small group 
of patients for up to a full academic year. 

What has been the students’ reaction to the proposed 
curriculum revision? 

Dr. Levitin: Students have played an active role in the 
planning of the new curriculum. The Dean and the Cur¬ 
riculum Committee discussed the proposed curriculum 
at a meeting of the student body. Students have dis¬ 
cussed various aspects of the proposed revision of the 
curriculum with members of the Curriculum Committee. 
A recent survey, developed and conducted by the Stu¬ 
dent Council indicated student preference for the now 
accepted curriculum. 




4 






I ' 

Vhat is the faculty attitude? 

Jr. Levitin: The new proposal was unanimously ap- 
: jroved by the Board of Permanent Officers. My own 
" eeling is that the majority of the faculty are strongly 
behind the new curriculum and this will be a key factor 
1 n its ultimate success. 

A/ill written examinations or the establishment of class 
standings, long absent under the “Yale System”, be re- 
, juired under the new curriculum? 

Dr. Levitin: I am strongly opposed, as are a large ma¬ 
jority of the faculty, to the introduction of required 
graded examinations and class standings. We will con¬ 
tinue to require satisfactory completion of Part I and 
Part II of the examination given by the National Board 
of Medical Examiners. Additional required examina¬ 
tions would be incompatible with the student’s ability 
to study at his own pace in an individualized program. 

|i There is a need, however, for an improved system of 
evaluating students’ progress, which should be based 
on an increased amount of personal contact between 
the faculty and students. 

From the Curriculum Committee Report 

The Committee unanimously recommends that (the new 
curriculum) be inaugurated for the class entering in 
September, 1968. The following statements are provided 
as amplification: 

1. The first three academic semesters of eighteen weeks 
each are assigned to the teaching of basic sciences. 
(This includes the basic, behavioral, social, epidemio¬ 
logical, and pre-clinical sciences.) During the second 
semester of the first year significant portions of the 
courses Introduction to Clinical Medicine, Laboratory 
Medicine, Pathology, and Pharmacology will be com¬ 
pleted. The remainder of these courses will be given in 
the third semester (beginning of the second year). 

2. The total number of hours assigned to each basic 
science course will be that described in the report of 
the “Adelberg Committee” on April 12, 1967. 

3. The inclusion of significant portions of the courses 
Introduction to Clinical Medicine, Laboratory Medicine, 
Pathology, and Pharmacology in the first year will pre¬ 
pare the student for clinical activity during the first 
summer. Each student will be required to have six 
weeks of clinical experience during one of the two six- 
week periods available during the first summer. This 
clinical experience should be designed to give the stu¬ 
dent first hand involvement in the delivery of health 
services. 


4. A limited number of students will be selected for a 
regular six-week standard clinical clerkship during the 
first summer. This will permit the faculty to compare 
the work of such students with those who have had the 
full complement of basic science courses before enter¬ 
ing on the wards, as an experiment in medical education. 

5. The remaining six weeks of the first summer not 
used for clinical experience will be available to the 
student for employment and vacation. 

6. During the fourth and fifth semesters the student will 
rotate through six six-week clinical clerkships. In order 
to complete his requirements of twelve weeks each of 
Medicine and Surgery, and six weeks each of Psychia¬ 
try, Pediatrics, and Obstetrics and Gynecology, the stu¬ 
dent will be obliged to complete one additional six- 
week clerkship. This may be accomplished during the 
second or third summer, each of which will have two 
six-week blocks of time available. 

7. The sixth, seventh, and eighth semesters will be de¬ 
voted to specialized programs, or “tracks”. Each track 
should contain the following curricular activities: 

a. A series of graduate-level science courses relevant to 
the student’s goals. These courses should be concen¬ 
trated in the sixth semester with a progressive decrease 
in the seventh and eighth semesters. 

b. One or more courses which correlate clinical medi¬ 
cine and fundamental science. 

c. Appropriate clinical experience, starting in the sixth, 
and progressively increasing throughout the seventh 
and eighth semesters. 

d. Out-patient clinic experience (medicine and pedi¬ 
atrics), at least two half-days per week for one eighteen- 
week semester, or one half-day per week for two 
eighteen-week semesters. 

(The above outline is subject to change at the request 
of a student after consultation with his advisor and the 
Dean’s Office.) 

8. The research thesis will continue to be a require¬ 
ment for graduation. Time for thesis work will be avail¬ 
able during the first, second and third summers, as well 
as during the three “track” semesters. 

9. The student may elect to take Part I of the National 
Board Examination at the end of his second year or at 
the end of his third year. In either case, he may take it 
either in June or in September. He will continue to take 
Part II of the examination at the end of his eighth se¬ 
mester. 

The Curriculum Committee further recommends the 
creation of three new committees: An ad hoc Commit¬ 
tee for the Teaching of Fundamental Sciences, which 
will direct its attention to the course content and course 


5 





sequence in the first three semesters; an ad hoc Com¬ 
mittee on Clinical Clerkships, which will direct its at¬ 
tention to the newly created clinical experience during 
the first summer and a review of the clinical clerkships 
during the fourth and fifth semesters; an ad hoc Com¬ 
mittee on the Multiple Track Program, which will direct 
its attention to the multiple track system. This commit¬ 
tee will deal with the advanced graduate-level courses 
in science given primarily during the sixth semester and 
also the correlative and clinical courses given during 
the seventh and eighth semester. 

Concluding Remarks 

The principal advantages of the plan outlined above are 
the following: 

1. Adequate time is provided for the teaching of re¬ 
quired fundamental science courses at the beginning of 
the curriculum. 

2. The goal of earlier clinical experience has been 
achieved in that six weeks of clinical experience are 
provided for all students in their first summer, and 
regular clerkships start in the fourth semester. 

3. Three full semesters are provided at the end of the 
curriculum for specialized programs. This will allow the 
student to plan, with his advisor, a major portion of his 
curriculum according to his own talents and interest. 

4. The teaching of basic science is extended into the 
last two years, in a manner which will permit a maxi¬ 
mum of coordination with clinical teaching. 


5. The faculty has an unprecedented opportunity t( 
conduct continuing experiments in medical education 
Answers may now be obtained to such questions as 
What is the effect of starting the regular clerkships ii 
the first summer? How does the student respond to the 
basic science courses after he has had some clinical ex 
perience? The flexibility provided by the use of sum 
mers and by the track system should permit many op' 
portunities for research in medical education. 

In conclusion, the Committee wishes to reaffirm the 
following statement of the preceding committee: 

“One of the most significant aspects of the new cur¬ 
riculum is the creation of the office of Associate Dean 
for the Curriculum. For the first time, an administrative I 
mechanism will exist for the year-to-year supervision 
of the curriculum by an officer of the school. The Board 
of Permanent Officers should take full advantage of this 
opportunity to carry on a continuing effort to improvel 
and coordinate the various components of its curricu-j 
lum.” 


E. A. Adelberg (Chairman) 

R. M. Acheson 

K. G. Bensch 

J. W. Cole 

]. E. Coleman 

C. D. Cook 

E. S. Crelin 


N. J. Giarman 
H. Levitin 
T. Lidz 
A. R. Martin 

E. J. Quilligan 
D. Seligson 

F. C. Redlich (ex officio) 


6 








I ale and The ABCC 

If Spring 1968 finds Yale’s Department of Internal Medi- 
p ) cine marking a decade of dedicated involvement in 
s re work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in 
i span. 

f It is ten years since Yale first agreed to provide a 
hief of medicine for the ABCC staff. The agreement, 
i n informal one made between Dr. Paul B. Beeson, then 
hairman of internal medicine at Yale, and Dr. R. Keith 
lannan, who was director of the medical division of 
he National Academy of Sciences, has endured. Since 
958, five Yale physicians have served as chief of medi- 
:ine with the ABCC in Hiroshima: Dr. ]. William Hol- 
ingsworth, Dr. Stuart C. Finch, Dr. Lawrence R. Freed- 
nan, Dr. Kenneth G. Johnson and Dr. Benedict R. Harris, 
he present chief. These men have carefully selected 
earns of younger physicians, principally from Yale, 
Aho have also gone to Japan to work in the medical 
Drogram. 


But Yale doctors have also played a continuing role 
from the earliest studies of those killed and injured by 
the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 
August of 1945 until the present. 

It was the late Dr. Ashley W. Oughterson, on leave 
from the Yale faculty during World War II and then 
serving as a surgical consultant to General MacArthur, 
who first realized the importance of a medical investi¬ 
gation in the bombed areas. He drew up plans for the 
investigation in late August, 1945, and by early October 
the first team of investigators arrived in Hiroshima. 

Among them was Dr. Averill A. Liebow, who later 
published a detailed account of his experiences in Hiro¬ 
shima. “Encounter with Disaster—a Medical Diary of 
Hiroshima, 1945” appeared in the spring 1966 issue of 
the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine. 

Of his first look at the bombed city on October 12, 
Dr. Liebow wrote: “Finally we saw the shocking and 



Hiroshima: before the atomic 
blast, and in the fall of 1945. 



7 








breathtaking sight of Hiroshima below, devastated, cold 
—an ash ... on the field were some horribly scarred 
children including a boy who told us in understandable 
English of his experience. . . . The roads are still littered 
with wreckage of every description. There are many 
burned out trucks and cars. Charred poles have col¬ 
lapsed and jumbled wires criss-cross the path. Most 
remarkable is the fact that through this scene of deso¬ 
lation street cars are running through the middle of the 
devastated and almost empty city . . 

In the introduction to his diary, Dr. Liebow writes of 
the contributions made by Yale doctors: 

‘‘Men of the Yale Medical School were closely asso- 



Dr. Darling (center] has been director of the ABCC since 1957. Dr, Freed¬ 
man (right) was succeeded by Dr. Johnson (left) as chief of medicine in 
1964. Other Yale doctors who have served as chiefs of medicine are 
pictured on the opposite page. 

dated with the studies at Hiroshima from the beginning 
and have remained so to the present time. Col. Oughter- 
son himself was an associate professor of surgery on 
leave, and three others of the seven medical officers as¬ 
signed to Hiroshima had been Yale medical students 
and two were on leave from the faculty.” 

Dr. Liebow also notes that when the Joint Commis¬ 
sion for the Investigation of the Effects of the Atomic 
Bomb in Japan became the Atomic Bomb Casualty Com¬ 
mission in 1948, one of the first pathologists assigned 
was Dr. William J. Wedemeyer, Yale medical class of 
1946. Another medical alumnus, Dr. Thomas Francis, 
Jr., now professor of epidemiology at the University of 
Michigan, designed the closed population sampling study 
that is now the core of the operation at ABCC. 

Since 1957, the program has been under the capable 
leadership of Dr. George B. Darling, professor of human 
ecology, who has been on leave of absence from Yale 


serving as director of the ABCC. Dr. Darling’s contribu 
tions to the work of the organization were recognizee 
last fall by the Japan Medical Association. The Asso¬ 
ciation presented him with its highest award, the Gold¬ 
en Orchid Supreme Award, for his ‘‘outstanding services! 
to the promotion of cooperation in the field of medical 
science between the United States and Japan.” He is 
the first American to receive the award. 

The Work of the Commission 

While many first hand observations of the devastating 
effects of the atomic bomb on humans were made by 
Japanese scientists immediately after the bombs fell, 
and soon after by the Joint Commission teams, it took 
considerably longer to accumulate the detailed popula¬ 
tion studies which have been published but are not yet 
completed. 

The first task was that of locating survivors in order 
to carry out these studies. Many of those who survived 
the atomic blasts moved out of the cities during the 
years immediately after 1945. Some were soldiers who 
returned to their homes. The ABCC first made local 
population surveys and conducted limited medical ob¬ 
servations, but it was not until 1950 that the major por¬ 
tion of the survivors were located. At that time, thej 
Japanese government included a question in the nation¬ 
al census which asked every Japanese citizen whether! 
or not he was in Hiroshima or Nagasaki at the time of I 
the atomic bombings. This information was made avail¬ 
able to ABCC and a master file of all known survivors 
was created. Since that time, this population informa¬ 
tion has been repeatedly reviewed and gradually im¬ 
proved upon. From this information, the populations 
for study are selected. 

During the late 1940’s and early 1950’s a number of 
important medical observations were made. The most t 
outstanding of these were the relatively high leukemia 
rate and the detection of radiation cataracts in the 
heavily exposed survivors. 

The incidence of leukemia was first noted to rise in 
1948, and reached a peak during the years 1952 and 
1953, at which time there was a 30- to 50-fold increase 
in those persons exposed within 1800 meters of the ex¬ 
plosion’s hypocenter. In general, the development of 
leukemia can be related to the intensity of exposure so 
that those located at more remote distances from the 
hypocenter appear to have little risk in this respect. 

Although the leukemia rate has decreased since 1953 
and the risk to any particular exposed person is con¬ 
sidered small, according to an ABCC report, a some- 


8 


! 








id what higher rate persists in the exposed as compared 
et to the nonexposed. At the present time the leukemia 
o, rate in the heavily exposed populations is about two or 
J. three times that of the non-exposed population. 

;s Studies of the offspring of exposed parents have 
shown no detectable increase in malformations, still 
s births, or leukemia. There is some evidence, however, 
that either maternal or paternal preconception radiation 
exposure may alter the normal male to female ratio of 
their progeny. Radiation exposure during fetal life has 
resulted in the birth of a few children with microceph- 
! aly, and some retardation of growth and development 
during childhood. 


medical examination of about 20,000 exposed and non¬ 
exposed subjects in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The in¬ 
formal agreement in which Yale began to provide the 
American personnel for the medical program, starting 
in 1958, has helped to maintain continuity of personnel 
vital to the success of this study. 

In its 10 years of operation, Dr. Finch reports, the 
Adult Health Study has been very successful. Perhaps 
the most encouraging aspect of a long range study of 
this kind is the fact that about 80 per cent of the avail¬ 
able subjects regularly participate in the medical exam¬ 
ination program. This unusually high level of coopera¬ 
tion has permitted ABCC physicians to document the 


i 


Dr. Hollingsworth Dr. Finch 


Dr. Harris 





More recent studies at ABCC have shown a modest 
increase in thyroid cancer in the heavily exposed sub¬ 
jects. There also is a suggestion that the risk for other 
types of cancer may be slightly increased in the ex¬ 
posed. This subject now is under intensive study. 

In a summary of the ABCC’s work, a former chief of 
medicine, Dr. Stuart Finch, now professor of medicine 
at Yale, says that in the early and middle 1950’s prior 
to Yale's involvement in the medical program, “some 
difficulty was encountered by the Academy in maintain¬ 
ing a constant flow of American personnel, and medical 
programs were maintained with difficulty because of 
lack of personnel continuity.” 

In 1957, the ABCC entered a new phase of its studies 
with the recommendation of a committee chaired by 
Dr. Thomas Francis, Jr., for the new long-range medical 
surveillance program which later became known as the 
Adult Health Study. The program involves periodic 


development of a great variety of infectious, neoplastic 
and degenerative diseases in both the exposed and non¬ 
exposed populations. The studies have included many 
important negative findings and have helped to define 
a population with minimal exposure which was beyond 
the range of radiation injury. These observations have 
helped relieve the anxieties of many people in Hiro¬ 
shima and Nagasaki. 

The Department of Medicine at ABCC also maintains 
an active research program within the framework of 
the Adult Health Study. Practically all staff physicians 
are involved in some type of investigative work. Par¬ 
ticular attention is directed to such subjects as aging, 
neoplasia, hematologic disease, cardiovascular disor¬ 
ders, genetic aberrations, and alterations in immune 
mechanisms. Many of these projects are carried on for 
several years, while others are of a short-term nature 
and may be completed in a matter of a few months. 









Upon completion, each project is written up as an 
ABCC Technical Report, printed both in English and 
Japanese, and is distributed to individuals and institu¬ 
tions with an interest in the program. Many of the re¬ 
ports are also published in various scientific journals 
usually in Japan or the United States. 

Among the research programs, virtually all of which 
are designed to determine the late effects of exposure 
to ionizing radiation, are the continuing observation of 
exposed subjects for the detection of leukemia and re¬ 
lated disorders. Children who were in utero at the time 
of the atomic detonations also are carefully watched. 

Among the most recent major research projects de¬ 
veloped at the ABCC are cytogenetic studies which 
have uncovered significant numbers of chromosomal 
abnormalities in the lymphocytes of exposed persons. 
The ABCC also has recently initiated a cardiovascular 
disease study in which the characteristics and frequency 
of cardiovascular disease in the Japanese of Hiroshima, 
Hawaii, and California are compared. 

A Joint Endeavor 

A highly important aspect of the work of the ABCC 
and of its predecessor the Joint Commission has been 
its operation as a joint endeavor of both Japanese and 
American scientists. Japanese doctors have been deeply 
involved in the research work from the beginning of the 
studies in 1945. In 1948 the National Institute of Health 
of the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Japan initiated 
its joint participation in the ABCC, a participation which 
has continued to the present day. 

The years 1962 and 1963 were of great importance 
for the strengthening of the United States-Japan part¬ 
nership in the study of the late effects of the atomic 
bombs. Agreements were exchanged between ABCC 
and the Japanese Institute of Health on the joint con¬ 
duct of all three major studies at ABCC: Life Span 
Study, Adult Health Study and Pathology Studies. 

At the moment, there are about 800 employees at 
ABCC, most of them Japanese. The main headquarters 
are in Hiroshima, with a smaller unit in Nagasaki. Gen¬ 
eral medical facilities of the organization in both cities 
are excellent. The large ABCC department of statistics 
maintains the latest electronic equipment for medical 
data processing. 

Virtually all the Yale personnel who have been asso¬ 
ciated with the ABCC feel that the scientific rewards 
have been most valuable. Particularly valuable, writes 
Dr. Finch, has been the exposure to large scale epi¬ 
demiologic medicine with rigid statistical controls. 


And, he adds, "The personal rewards for undertaking 
one of these assignments are almost indescribable. One 
cannot help but be impressed with the beauty of Japan 
and the wonderful culture of its people. Out of initial 
chaos, scientific personnel have been drawn together 
from distant parts of the world. Lasting friendships 
have been established in the communities and with the 
staffs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki University Medical 
Schools. It is hoped that it will be possible to maintain 
these friendships for years to come.” 

Another former chief of medicine, Dr. Lawrence R. 
Freedman, now associate professor of medicine at Yale, 
defines Yale’s role in the ABCC this way: "The bomb¬ 
ings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki opened the doors to 
the era of nuclear power and threat of atomic destruc¬ 
tion. The citizens of Japan who were killed are a monu¬ 
ment to this event. The survivors, in large part, dedicate 
their thoughts and actions to work toward preventing 
any repetition of atomic destruction anywhere in the 
world. The Yale participants in the work of the ABCC 
are proud to join in this effort in the way they know 
best—the way of providing knowledge.” 

Editor’s note: Dr. Robert Jay Litton has recently joined the 
list of Yale faculty who have studied the aftereffects of the 
atomic bomb in Hiroshima. Dr. Lifton, who is Foundations’ 
Fund for Research in Psychiatry Professor of Psychiatry at 
Yale, has just published a book entitled Death in Life —Sur¬ 
vivors of Hiroshima, reviewed on page 25 of this issue of 
Yale Medicine. 



10 










AIM Campaign 


M edical alumni in the New York metropolitan area 
turned out more than one hundred strong for a 
dinner meeting on February 27 that marked what Dr. 
George A. Carden, Jr., called “the commencement of 
expanded medical alumni activities in connection with 
the new development plans at the Yale School of Medi¬ 
cine.” 

As New York area chairman of the Alumni in Medi¬ 
cine (AIM) campaign, Dr. Carden (’35] was master of 
ceremonies at the reception and dinner held at the Bilt- 
more Hotel. Noting that “an exciting new chapter is 
beginning to unfold in the history of the school,” Dr. 


Dean Redlich told New York area alumni that Yale’s new medical curricu¬ 
lum will place the school in the vanguard of the newest revolution in 
medicine. 


Carden invited the participation of all his fellow alumni 
in this critical demonstration of faith in the school. 

Dr. Carden heads a committee of more than thirty 
Yale doctors who have accepted the challenge to seek 
capital gifts personally from all alumni in the metro¬ 
politan area. Similar committees are working in other 
parts of the country, with dinner or luncheon meetings 
bringing alumni together in Hartford, San Francisco, 
Detroit, Washington, D.C., and other locations. 

The program and goals of the AIM campaign were 
outlined by Dr. Leona Baumgartner (Ph. D. ’32, M.D. 
’34), general chairman of the campaign. Plans call for 



11 






alumni contributions totaling at least 2.5 million dollars 
toward the over-all goal of 50.9 million dollars to be 
sought from private sources over the next ten years. 

“We have two jobs to do,’’ Dr. Baumgartner said. 
“First, to show that we ourselves believe in our school, 
and second, to help lead President Brewster, Dean Red- 
lich, and others who are going to approach foundations 
and corporations to these and other individual sources 
of money.” 

Dr. Baumgartner referred to the “tremendous obliga¬ 
tion I personally owe to the Yale medical school for the 


wonderful years I have had as a doctor.” She was 
stunned to discover, she said, the great difference be¬ 
tween the amount she had paid to Yale for her medical 
education and the amount that education had actually 
cost Yale. “I paid back the loans I had received in medi¬ 
cal school . . . and I had contributed to each appeal as it 
came along, but then I sat down and figured out that I 
hadn't even paid back half of what Yale had invested 
in me.” 

Dean Redlich, the main speaker of the evening, de¬ 
scribed Yale’s plans to take the lead in the “third revo- 








Dr. Benjamin Castleman [second from 
left], president of the Association of 
Yale Alumni in Medicine, with President 
Kingman Brewster and Drs. Baumgartner 
and Carden. 



Dr. Milton L. Dryfus, talking with Mr. 
Brewster, is an aiumnus of 1912, the 
earliest class represented at the dinner 
meeting. Dr. I ngiis F. Frost, '12, also 
attended. 













lution in medical education—the revolution of the con¬ 
sumer.” He cited as the earlier “revolutions” of this 
century: first, the development of university medical 
centers in response to the Flexner Report and, second, 
the strong emphasis on basic scientific research in the 
years following World War II. Defining the present 
trend, the dean said that for the first time “the patient, 
who is our consumer, has a strong voice, expressed di¬ 
rectly and through his representatives . . . which tells us 
what kind of care should be given.” 

Clinical practice at Yale, as at other medical schools, 


needs improvement, Dean Redlich stated, adding that 
pressures for this improvement will come increasingly 
from funding agencies, foundations, and ultimately from 
the patient. “We must respond to these pressures,” he 
said. “But apart from this, I am convinced that in order 
to teach first-rate medicine, we must practice first-rate 
medicine.” 

The major part of the dean’s talk was devoted to the 
new medical curriculum that will go into effect next 
fall. It is described in the article beginning on page 2 
of this issue. 




Graduates representing more than fifty years of medicine at Yale enjoyed 
the festive atmosphere of the New York AIM dinner. Old acquaintances 
were renewed at the preprandial reception. 



13 













Ex Libris 


A lthough the use of bookplates has declined in re¬ 
cent years, evidence that fine examples of the art 
are still being produced comes regularly from the Yale 
Medical Library. As new book funds are established, 
new plates are designed or existing ones are adapted to 
identify them. 

Four plates recently received from the printer are 
shown here, with brief descriptions of their respective 
book funds. They are among more than 80 plates used 
by the library for its endowed book funds and other 
special gifts. 

This spring some 200 medical bookplates have been 
on exhibit in the rotunda of the library. The majority 
of these are from the Lowenhaupt Collection deposited 
in this library 15 years ago by the late Warren Lowen¬ 
haupt, who was curator of bookplates in Yale’s Sterling 
Memorial Library. 

Examples in nine display cases show not only a va¬ 
riety of fine designs but also indicate the wide range of 
interests of English, European, and American physi¬ 
cians from the 17th century on. The tenth case is de¬ 
voted to a selection of plates currently used in the 
library to identify some of its book funds. 


A newly designed bookplate for the Herbert Thoms 
Book Fund shows Deane Keller's 1945 drawing of Dr. 
Thoms, now professor emeritus of obstetrics and gyne¬ 
cology. The fund was established in April, 1967, by gifts 
from the Associates of the Yale Medical Library, of 
which Dr. Thoms was chairman from the time of its 
founding in 1948 until last year. He is now honorary 
chairman as well as curator of Yale medical memora¬ 
bilia in the library. The bookplate was designed by John 
O. C. McCrillis of the Yale University Press. 


A bookplate for the Streeter Collection Fund, also de¬ 
signed by Mr. McCrillis, has central lettering printed in 
red, with surrounding black lettering in a red frame, all 
on a white background. The Streeter Collection Fund 
was established in April, 1965, by bequest of Alice 
Chase [Mrs. E. C.) Streeter for the maintenance of the 
Edward Clark Streeter Collection of Weights and Meas¬ 
ures in the Yale Medical Library and for the purchase 
of books on weights and measures. 

Dr. Streeter, an 1898 graduate of Yale College, gave 
his uniquely comprehensive collection of weights and 
measures, dating from ancient civilizations through the 
19th century, prior to the dedication of the present li¬ 
brary building in 1941. 


HERBERT THOMS 
BOOK FUND 

YALE MEDICAL LIBRARY 




purest ellixar and extraction 


j= r 

4—t 

S 

'5 

C3 


05 

C3 

0-> 

£3 

05 


05 




3*itoanl 

Clark 

Streeter 

fund 

YALE MEDICAL LIBRARY 


co 

r-t 

S 

to 

r-t 

r ^ 

3“ 

n 

r-t 

r-t 

C a 

r-t 

r-t 

r*> 

d 

r-t 


14 
















Gifts from Wesleyna S. (Mrs. William H.) Ordway of 
Somers, Connecticut, and Julia Sorg of Saratoga Springs, 
New York, have established the William H. Ordway 
(M.D. 1912) Memorial Book Fund. The bookplate for 
this fund is adapted from Dr. Ordway’s personal book¬ 
plate, which he had completed just before his death in 
1955. It illustrates his interest in weather, books, magic, 
and railroads. The engine was a real one on the Whit¬ 
field and Jefferson Railroad out of Vermont, called the 
“Dr. Ordway.” His family crest is shown with the 
books. The mountains represent Mt. McGregor, New 
York, where Dr. Ordway was chief physician of the 
350-bed Mt. McGregor Sanatorium for nearly 30 years. 
It was there that he took up magic in order to entertain 
his patients. 


YALE MEDICAL LIBRARY 



YALE MEDICAL LIBRARY 


The George Blumer Book Fund, established in August, 
1963, by gifts from friends and associates in memory of 
George Blumer, M.D. (M.A. Hon. 1907), received its 
bookplate in February, 1967, when Dr. Blumer’s per¬ 
sonal bookplate was adapted for the fund. Dr. Blumer 
was John Slade Ely Professor of the Theory and Prac¬ 
tice of Medicine, 1906-1920; David P. Smith Clinical 
Professor of Medicine, 1920-1940; and clinical professor 
emeritus from 1940 until his death in 1963. He was dean 
of the School of Medicine from 1910 to 1920. 


15 
















































































West to the East 


by Bernard D. Beitman 



Hindu celebration for the god Shiva 


D uring March, 1967, after having reviewed my appli¬ 
cation, Dr. Katherine Bains of the Children’s Bu¬ 
reau Section of the Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare asked me if I was prepared to go to Dacca, 
East Pakistan. I was. 

This trip had been in the day-dreaming stages for 
many years; the idea of going to the Indian subconti¬ 
nent had fascinated me ever since the concept of 
Brahman-Atman came up in a history of religions class. 
What kind of people are these who believe in the 
wheel of Karma, fatalistically chained to inevitable 
reincarnation? Who are these brown-skinned, shriv- 
elled-up, miserably impoverished human beings? Could 
I, as- a doctor, do anything for these people; would my 
experience among them be as rewarding as it was for 


Mr. Beitman, at present a fourth-year medical student 
at Yale, received a Children’s Bureau Fellowship to 
work at the Pakistan-SEATO Cholera Research Labora¬ 
tory in Dacca, East Pakistan, during the summer of 
1967. 


Tom Dooley? And was there for me, as there was for ! 
Larry in Somerset Maugham's The Razor’s Edge, some- ! 
thing of great personal importance to be discovered? 

After Dr. Bains’ phone call I went to my wall map 
and touched the small distant dot of Dacca nestled in ; 
the center of the pink land mass labelled East Pakistan, j 
For the first time I noticed how greatly separated the | 
other half of the country was; West Pakistan was about | 
two inches away (1000 miles) across the top of hostile 
India. It was not a healthy separation, although it was | 
the inevitable result of the Moslem secession from the j 
Hindus. 

Dr. Bains had requested that I prepare an itinerary i 
and when I presented it to her the next day it was 
completely acceptable. Her office proceeded to make 
all the necessary arrangements and I was left to con¬ 
jecture about what was to come. Among the few im¬ 
portant facts the library yielded was that East Pakistan 
has a population of about 55 million while West Paki- j 
stan has a population of almost 15 million. East Paki¬ 
stan is primarily agricultural, located in the extremely 
fertile delta of the Ganges and Bramaputra rivers. West 


16 








Pakistan is five times larger, a chiefly industrial area 
which is rough and very dry. West Pakistan also main¬ 
tains most of the political power, a fact which was 
consantly reiterated by the government-controlled 
Dacca newspapers. The news media carried the state¬ 
ment that East Pakistan need no longer complain about 
the uneven distribution of government funds for eco¬ 
nomic development since this year the allocation to 
both wings was approximately the same. The disparity 
in population was not mentioned. 

My plans called for an around-the-world-journey in 
80 days with the assistance of fan-jets and taxis instead 
of Phoggian boat-trains and mad Indian elephants. I 
stopped in Hongkong for some incredible sights, a suit 
and a camera; Bangkok for a look at a sprawling, 
Westernizing metropolis (much U.S. money); and briefly 
in Calcutta for a stopover before the trip to Kathmandu, 
Nepal. By the time my Royal Nepalese airplane fluttered 
out of the sky onto the runway of Dacca International 
Airport, I was very tired of travelling and anxious to 
be in one place for more than just a few days. 

Having had no idea what to expect of the living 


Two years of chronic malabsorption 

conditions in Dacca I came prepared with a full bottle 
of One-A-Day Multiple Vitamins and an extra notch in 
my belt. 

I had been assigned to the Pakistan-SEATO Cholera 
Research Laboratory (CRL) which is a showplace for 
the U.S. government’s AID program in cooperation with 
SEATO; it is a well financed arena. Both a hospital 
and a research, center, the laboratory is staffed by 
American doctors who have finished one year of resi¬ 
dency in medicine and have joined the Public Health 
Service to fulfill their military obligation. The hospital 
section is run by five Pakistani residents for whom the 
Americans act as attendings. Since I was the first stu¬ 
dent to come to Dacca under the Children’s Bureau 
program, nobody knew specifically what I was to do 
except that I would be involved in some kind of re¬ 
search. The problem was tabled and I followed one of 
the American residents back to his house where he 
suggested I stay. The accommodations were excellent— 
spacious rooms, air-conditioning, a KLH record player 
with plenty of records, a houseboy and a superb cook. 
I had expected mudhuts and starvation diets and 



17 


found myself extremely comfortable and well fed. 

My life at the CRL began to take on some semblance 
of routine. Each day we travelled the two miles to the 
laboratory and each day we witnessed the never-ending 
drama of the poverty-stricken people of Dacca. Every¬ 
where dark brown, fleshless, lethargic bodies wrapped 
in tattered cloth gathered in isolated islands to talk and 
bargain. Skinny pathetic cows wandered like gargan¬ 
tuan stray dogs over roads and fields seeking grass and 
a resting place. Men worked like horses pulling and 
pushing huge heavily laden wagons to earn their 60 
cents a day. Small children, naked and alone, wandered 
quietly and aimlessly among the rocks and ruts along 
our way to work. The CRL, despite its restricted objec¬ 
tives and limited funds, is a first small step toward 
changing this centuries-old panorama. 

During morning rounds at the hospital I got a closer 
look at the more unfortunate of these people. 

The major problem treated at the hospital is dehy¬ 
dration which between October and February is most 
often caused by cholera. However, during the summer 
months when I was there, no patient had a verified 
case of cholera, although many came in with a typical 
cholera picture. One such patient was a 25-year-old 
man with a history of profuse liquid diarrhea and 
severe vomiting over a period of 24 hours. On admis¬ 
sion he was unconscious, barely breathing, pulseless, 
and with no obtainable blood pressure. He had no skin 
turgor and his eyes were deeply sunken into the sock¬ 
ets. The nursing staff and the Pakistani resident im¬ 
mediately mobilized for action. An I.V. bottle was hung 
up, and I was presented with the syringe for the blood 
sample. As I gingerly palpated the patient’s arm for a 
vein, the resident sponged off the right inguinal region 
and pointed toward the femoral. I gave him a question¬ 
ing glance and then felt for the femoral artery. Was 
the femoral vein medial or lateral? Medial. The thick 
red billowed into the syringe. We left the needle in 
place and poured in three liters of an isotonic mixture 
of saline, bicarbonate and potassium and within an 
hour the patient was asking for food. 

During the cholera season so many patients like him 
pour into the hospital requiring similar treatment that 
the major problem is procurement of a sufficient num¬ 
ber of I.V. bottles to achieve this dramatic recovery. 
One day, in addition to the convalescent patients, forty 
new severely dehydrated patients arrived needing treat¬ 
ment in a hospital that had only 35 beds. In times of 
stress the hospital manages very well and, despite its 
many difficult problems, it is also succeeding in build¬ 
ing excellent community relations. 



Protein-calorie malnutrition 


Still these relations are not yet ideal. One Friday a 
very sick 10-year-old boy was admitted with a history 
of mild diarrhea, vomiting and a fever of 105°. After 
one blood culture was drawn, his mother became fu¬ 
rious. “You are taking my boy’s blood to America. You 
are selling my boy’s blood to the United States,” she 
screamed in vehement Bengali. Although the residents 
tried to calm her, she swooped her boy into her arms 
and carried him home, away from the blood-stealing 
Americans. On Sunday the blood cultures grew out Sal¬ 
monella typhosa and an ambulance was sent to pick the 
boy up. The mother was impressed with the urgency of 
the situation and allowed him to be readmitted. Only 
the magic of chloramphenicol and steroids saved him 
and this happened only as the result of the ironic dis- 


18 










Old man of the village 


covery of typhoid in that single rage-inciting blood cul¬ 
ture. 

The CRL ran a field hospital in Matlab about 40 miles 
from Dacca where many excellent studies of the epi¬ 
demiology of cholera were being conducted. Early one 
Saturday morning I hopped into a CRL-chauffered 
Morris Minor and headed out of Dacca over a narrow 
road which had been built upon a ridgeway of dirt 
going straight though fields of wavy green rice and ris¬ 
ing waters. The countryside was a striking contrast to 
the frantic, excited closeness of Dacca. Cows wan¬ 
dered and rested in the road, goats scurried for safety 
and people with packs on their heads stepped aside 
as the Morris flew by. We crossed two small rivers by 
ferry where there were obvious signs that the rainy 


season was approaching. Since people who ride in cars 
have money, there are always a few beggars on the 
ferries. One dirty-faced, middle-aged man fancied him¬ 
self a window wiper and set to work with his dirty 
rag on the windows of his captive cars. As the ferry 
approached its destination, he tilted his head, veiled 
his eyes in mournful sadness, extended his up-turned 
palm and said “bakshish, bakshish,” the refrain which 
echoes throughout the sub-continent. 

Halfway through the summer I made the horrible dis¬ 
covery that the beggars of Dacca are organized. All the 
bedraggled little children crying "bakshish” are working 
for overseers who carefully regulate their activities. 
Many of them have been kidnapped and sometimes, to 
improve their appeal, their employers chop off a limb 
or perform some other maiming. But no matter what 
they receive, these unfortunate children keep none of 
it. And begging is one of Dacca’s biggest businesses. 

When the car reached the third river, I climbed into 
a small outboard powered by a good old U.S. |ohnson 
Super Sea Horse 33 and we went skipping over the 
small wind-driven waves of the half-mile-wide river 
penetrating a land whose primitive agrarian culture 
had not changed in a millennium. 

In this water-soaked country boats are the chief 
means of transportation and many of them dotted the 
river. There were small row boats propelled by small 
children; small covered sail boats on which families 
slept; and huge transport boats with monstrous sails 
and huge paddles laden with lumber or fruit or baskets 
for market. Running along each side of the river was a 
little path for the human haulers who pull the boats up¬ 
stream much as mules did along the Erie Canal. The 
sky was bright blue, the sun very warm and the clouds 
puffed into the beautiful shapes which harbinger the 
monsoon season. The wavy green of the rice stretched 
to infinity on either side of me and the boat skipped 
gaily over the muddy gray river. 

Matlab is a larger-than-ordinary cluster of shops, 
houses and boats and is the center of trading in the 
area. The hospital is very small and poorly equipped. 
It was run by a tired-looking, buck-toothed Pakistani 
who handled a wide spectrum of disease from hangnail 
to heart trouble day and night. Business was slow when 
I got there and since I had been looking longingly at 
the water, we went swimming together. After a while 
a crowd of villagers, mostly small boys, gathered to 
watch the white body in the strangely colored loin suit 
trying to shinny up one of the bridge supports. (I was 
trying to imitate some of the kids I had seen climb 
earlier, but success came slowly.) 


19 




“ Bakshish, bakshish" — Four children and no husband 


was a particularly highly rated delicacy so the half 
hour debate finally ended with 15 shareholders, my 
share having been appropriated by the doctor. 

The stillness of night on the river was broken only 
by soft jungle noises and the lap-lap of breeze-driven 
waves; western civilization seemed very distant. I slept 
well. 

The next morning, while roaming around the village, 
I was accosted by a young man pleading in broken 
English: “Please, please, may I have words with you? 
I wish to tell you my soul.’’ It was impossible to refuse. 


At dusk they served me a wonderfully varied meal: 
hot curried fish, hot curried shrimp and hot curried egg 
with mountains of rice and much water. Later I wan¬ 
dered among the villagers squatting and gossiping along 
the river. Out of the darkness of the water there came 
some excited voices and into the lantern light stepped 
a man holding a large glistening silvery fish. Rapidly a 
crowd of screaming bidders collected around him. Ear¬ 
lier this man had been standing in his rice paddy and 
had felt the fish flapping next to him. He grabbed a 
stick, stunned the fish and then knifed it. This animal 


20 












We went to a village cafe where he charged tea and 
cigarettes and had some sweets. “Oh, what a poor man 
I am. I have nothing. I am nothing. And why? Please 
tell me why. I was born into this; there is nothing I can 
do about it; there is nothing at all. It isn’t my fault, is it? 
If you tell me it is my fault, I will kill myself. It isn’t 
my fault, is it?’’ An existential dilemma on the other 
side of the world. 

After this brief trip I was inevitably drawn to com¬ 
pare these people with those of Vietnam. The terror 
and destruction caused by foreign bombs and invading 
armies would be little different for these people than 
for the victims of the current horror in rural Vietnam 
with its equally anachronistic civilization. It is difficult 
to imagine the world concept that exists in their minds 
—where would they think the foreign invaders lived 
and why would they come to their land? If our purpose 
in Asia is to acquaint these people with life as we know 
it and its considerable advantages, it will be many long 
slow decades until this goal is achieved, and in all of 
Asia it is vital in our introduction of ourselves that the 
Hindu rule of ahimsa —“do no harm”—be followed. If 
it is not, these many long slow decades will sprawl into 
centuries leaving more mistrust and violence in their 
wake. 

I also made an unforgettable visit to the Dacca Medi¬ 
cal College Hospital to see medicine as it is practiced 
for most of Dacca. The physical plant is a mammoth, 
dark, musty building which is both surrounded by and 
packed with sick Bengalis. My trip into its dark interior 
wound through catacomb-like mazes, past huge 60 -bed 
wards, along overflowing hallways reeking with the 
fetid, dank odor of decaying wounds and deathly-ill 
children. In one of the medical wards I was introduced 
to a professor of medicine whose rapid-fire questions 
and answers were reminiscent of some of our better 
clinical instructors. He presented a man with cutaneous 
adenomas, depressions in his skull and diabetes insipi¬ 
dus who would have been the joy of our entire medical 
staff. But in this huge ward the fascination of Hand- 
Schiiller-Christian disease must give way to the more 
motivating necessities. There were many rheumatic 
hearts, some with true grade VI/VI murmurs, a few 
teenage patent ductus patients whose hearts sounded 
like the center of an auto assembly plant, and much 
pneumonia and parasitic infestation. The variety of 
clinical cases is fantastic; the numbers are overwhelm¬ 
ing. Yet despite the tremendous lack of adequately 
trained personnel and anything like the sufficient funds, 
progress and improvement are coming to this hospital. 

At the CRL I had begun a research project which in¬ 


volved taking rectal catheter specimens from actively 
purging patients in order to compare the electrolyte 
content of these stools with that of cholera stools. The 
study yielded some significant data; however, eight 
weeks was not enough time to construct a thorough 
piece of research. 

Suddenly one day I was making arrangements to 
leave. Then I found myself waiting at the airport for 
the flight to Karachi and points west. It was over. But 
for me the experience in East Pakistan was extremely 
important. The world is no longer so big, foreign, and 
frightening, and I found much to be discovered outside 
the confines of our comfortable existence in the United 
States. 

Although it would be easy to be lulled into an estab¬ 
lished role in this country, I hope to return someday to 
Asia to make changes instead of just observations. 


The author 



21 


I 


Internship Appointments 


Julius Horne Anderson, Jr., fellowship, Johnson Research Foundation, 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 

Joseph Francis Andrews, Jr., medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 

Laurence Eugene Badgley, rotating, Fitzsimons General Hospital, Denver, 
Colorado. 

Philip Lane Barry, surgery, Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, New 
York. 

Daniel Ira Becker, medicine, Boston City Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Bernard David Beitman, rotating, Mount Zion Hospital, San Francisco, 
California. 

Stuart Jay Brill, pathology, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

Wade Douglas Carden, rotating, Cincinnati General Hospital, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

William John Catalona, surgery, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

Donald Ross Coustan, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

Rutledge Withers Currie, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

John James DeMarchi, rotating, Buffalo General Hospital, Buffalo, New 
York. 

Robert Guerard Dillard, pediatrics, City of Memphis Hospitals, Memphis, 
Tennessee. 

Edward Martin Druy, rotating, Hennepin County General Hospital, Min¬ 
neapolis, Minnesota. 

Barbara Mayer Egbert, pathology, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

Lamar Eric V. Ekbladh, rotating, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connect¬ 
icut. 

Luther Lee Emerson, medicine, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, 
New York. 

Alan George Finesilver, surgery. Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Massachu¬ 
setts. 

William Francis Flynn, surgery, Boston City Hospital, Boston, Massachu¬ 
setts. 

Frank Albert Gerbode, pediatrics, Palo Alto-Stanford Hospital Center, 
Palo Alto, California. 

Richard Alan Getnick, medicine, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleve¬ 
land, Ohio. 

Mark Gilbert Grand, medicine, Palo Alto-Stanford Hospital Center, Palo 
Alto, California. 

Leonard Edwin Grauer, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

Ralph Steven Greco, surgery, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

Kevin Newell Hennessey, medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

John Roy Hill, 2d, pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Hospital, Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

Harry Sherman Holcomb, 3d, rotating, University of Virginia Hospital, 
Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Thomas Randall Johnson, rotating, University of Oregon Medical School 
Hospitals, Portland, Oregon. 

Peter Jokl, surgery, Vanderbilt University Hospital, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Marian Grace Jordison, medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 
Lexington, Kentucky. 

William Francis Keane, Jr., medicine, Cornell University Hospitals, New 
York, New York. 

Daniel Edward Keim, pediatrics, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Bos¬ 
ton, Massachusetts. 

Peter Appleton Kirkpatrick, medicine, Edward J. Meyer Memorial Hospi¬ 
tal, Buffalo. New York. 

Peter Andrew LaRiviere, rotating, U.S. Public Health Service, San Fran¬ 
cisco, California. 

Jeffrey Stuart Lee, rotating, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, San 
Francisco, California. 

Ellen Marks Lippman, pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Community Pediatric 
Program, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Marc Estes Lippman, medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Mary¬ 
land. 

Peter Allen Livingston, medicine, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Frank Edward Lucente, medicine, Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Donald Owen Lyman, medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, 
Florida. 

Stephen Irving Marglin, medicine, Palo Alto-Stanford Hospital Center, 
Palo Alto, California. 

Rodrigo Ernesto Martinez, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 

John Allen McCutchan, medicine, Vanderbilt University Hospital, Nash¬ 
ville, Tennessee. 

Harmon Robert Michelson, medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, 
Florida. 

David Phillips Millett, surgery, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New 
Haven, Connecticut. 


Class of 1968 


Richard Pence Mills, medicine, University of Oregon Medical School * 
Hospitals, Portland, Oregon. 

Richard Manning Morehead, Jr., rotating. University of New Mexico 
Affiliated Hospitals, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

James Bruce Morris, medicine, Buffalo General Hospital, Buffalo, New 
York. 

Peter Nicholas, Jr., medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York. 

John Anthony Ogden, surgery, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

James William Ogilvie, surgery, University of California Hospital, San 
Francisco, California. 

Margot Debrah Piore Oneli, medicine, Veteran's Administration Hospital, 
George Washington Service, Washington, D.C. 

Henry Francis Panek, rotating, U.S. Naval Hospital, Pensacola, Florida. 

Francis Ferdinand Paul, rotating, U.S. Naval Hospital, Pensacola, Florida. 

William E. Perkins, pediatrics, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleve¬ 
land, Ohio. 

Jackson Brittain Pickett, medicine, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

Charles Truman Post. Jr., rotating. North Carolina Memorial Hospital, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 

Ralph Jerome Rauch, rotating, Roosevelt Hospital, New York, New York. 

Joseph Leonard Renda, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

Marvin Joel Rosser, rotating, Presbyterian-University of Pennsylvania 
Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Gordon Hiroshi Sasaki, rotating, University of Oregon Medical School 
Hospitals, Portland, Oregon. 

Alfred Quinn Scheuer, pediatrics, State University of New York, Upstate j 
Medical Center. Syracuse, New York. 

Jacob Joseph Schlesinger, pathology, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 

George Francis Sheckleton, Jr., rotating, U.S. Public Health Service. 

Frederick Charles Sherman, surgery, University of Michigan Affiliated j 
Hospitals, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Elizabeth Meehan Short, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. New ! 
Haven, Connecticut. 

Bruce Stuart Schoenberg, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Mary¬ 
land. 

Howard William Siegel, pathology, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, New | 
Haven, Connecticut. 

Jerrold Jay Silverstein, rotating, Montefiore Hospital, New York, New 
York. 

Laura Alice Smith, pediatrics, University of Michigan Affiliated Hospitals, 
Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Marie Zoreslawa Snihurowycz, medicine, Vanderbilt University Hospital, \ 
Nashville, Tennessee. 

David Aaron Siskis, rotating, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida. 

Gerald Lehman Springer, medicine, District of Columbia General Hospi- j 
tal, Washington, D.C. 

Donald Harvey Stanford, rotating, Mount Zion Hospital, San Francisco, 
California. 

Lee Howells Strohl, rotating, Passavant Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Il¬ 
linois. 

Charles Wesley Swearingen, Jr., Brain Research Institute, University of 
California, Los Angeles, California. 

Edmund Conrad Tortolani, surgery, Yale-New Haven Medical Center, ] 
New Haven, Connecticut. 

Martin Wand, medicine, Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, Cleve¬ 
land, Ohio. 

James Lloyd Weiss, medicine, University of Michigan Affiliated Hospitals, 
Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Harold Terry Wepsic, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. 

Per Henrik Wickstrom, rotating, Hennepin County General Hospital, Min¬ 
neapolis, Minnesota. 

Robert Joseph Winer, rotating, Mount Zion Hospital, San Francisco, Cali¬ 
fornia. 

Creed William Wood, surgery, H, C. Moffitt — University of California 
Hospitals, San Francisco, California. 




22 













i 

Yale Alumni Seminar, 1968 

M edical alumni and their spouses are invited to at¬ 
tend the Twelfth Annual Yale Alumni Seminar in 
June. The dates and topics are shown below. The regis¬ 


The Dollar in the World 

Tuesday, June 11 
Lectures 

Gold and the Wealth of Nations 

James Tobin, Sterling professor of economics 

An Agreed International Standard 

Robert Triffin, Frederick William Beinecke professor of 
economics 

Gold and the Dollar 

William McChesney Martin, chairman of the Federal 
Reserve Board 

Discussion session with a panel composed of the lec¬ 
turers and alumni panelists 

The Satiric Itch 

Wednesday, June 12 
Lectures 

The Strong Antipathy: Origins and Forms of Satire 
Alvin B. Kernan, associate provost of the University, 
professor of English 

Chaucer’s ‘Worthy Women': The Wife of Bath and 
Others 

Alice Miskimin, assistant professor of English 

Image-Makers and Breaker s: Dryden, Marvell, and 

Some Contemporaries 

George deF. Lord, professor of English 

Prisoners and Gentlemen 

Michael J. O’Loughlin, assistant professor of English 


tration fee is $12.50 per person. Detailed information 
and registration forms may be obtained by writing to 
Box 1918, Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut 06520. 


The Individual and Reproduction 

Thursday, June 13 

Lectures 

Sex Education 

The Rev. Edward F. Dobihal Jr., lecturer in pastoral 
theology 

Current Approaches to Fertility and Infertility Control 
Dr. Nathan G. Kase, associate professor of obstetrics and 
gynecology 

Research and Fertility Control 

Dr. John McL. Morris, professor of gynecology 

Abortion 

Dr. Edward J. Quilligan, professor of obstetrics and 
gynecology 

The Artist in America: the Search for an American Art 

Friday, June 14 
Lectures 

Realism and the American Tradition 

Jules D. Prown, assistant professor of history of art 

American Architecture Rooted in American Soil 
George L. Hersey, assistant professor of history of art 

The Artist Today as American and World Citizen 
William Richard Lytle, associate professor of art 

Studies in the special exhibition ‘American Art from 
Alumni Collections’ 


23 



In and About Sterling Hall 


Dr. Murdoch Ritchie Appointed 
Chairman of Pharmacology 

Dr. Murdoch Ritchie, an authority on 
the mechanism of nerve conduction, 
has been appointed Eugene Higgins 
Professor of Pharmacology and 
chairman of the department at Yale, 
effective July 1, 1968. 



Dr. Ritchie 


He succeeds Dr. Arnold D. Welch, 
who resigned in 1967 to become vice- 
president of E. R. Squibb & Sons and 
director of the Squibb Institute for 
Medical Research at New Brunswick, 
New Jersey. 

Dr. Ritchie’s major field of interest 
is the pharmacology and physiology 
of nerve conduction. Recently, he 
has carried out experiments to deter¬ 
mine the active structure of local 
anesthetics. He is currently studying 
both the heat production and oxygen 
consumption of mammalian nerve 
fibers and hoW these factors are af¬ 
fected by various drugs. It is hoped 
this study will help to reveal funda¬ 
mental changes in the nerve mem¬ 
brane involved in the conduction of 
messages via the nerves. 

Dr. Ritchie was born in Aberdeen, 
Scotland. After being awarded his 
first bachelor's degree from Aber¬ 
deen University in 1944, he did post¬ 
graduate research in physics at the 
Telecommunications Research Es¬ 
tablishment, Malvern, England. 

He then became a research student 


under Professor A. V. Hill in the bio¬ 
physics department of University 
College, London. In 1949 he was ap¬ 
pointed assistant professor in physi¬ 
ology at University College and the 
same year the Institute of Physics 
elected him an associate, the equiva¬ 
lent of a post-graduate degree in 
physics. 

In 1951 he resigned his assistant 
professorship to join the scientific 
research staff of the British Medical 
Research Council. As a result of his 
research on the physiology of mus¬ 
cle, he was awarded the Ph.D. degree 
from University College in 1952. 

Dr. Ritchie left the Medical Re¬ 
search Council in 1956 to become 
visiting assistant professor of phar¬ 
macology at the Albert Einstein Col¬ 
lege of Medicine in New York City. 
In 1958 he was promoted to associ¬ 
ate professor and in 1963 to profes¬ 
sor. As a result of his published work 
on the physiology of mammalian 
nerve fibers, the University of Lon¬ 
don in 1960 awarded him the degree 
of Doctor of Science. 

During 1964-65 he was an Over¬ 
seas Fellow of Churchill College, 
Cambridge, England. He is a member 
of the American Society for Pharma¬ 
cology and Experimental Therapeu¬ 
tics, the American Physiological So¬ 
ciety, the Biophysics Society, the 
British Physiological Society, the 
British Pharmacological Society and 
the British Biophysical Society. 

Student-Faculty-Hospital 
Committee Formed 

A new committee bringing together 
members of the student body, fac¬ 
ulty, and hospital administration has 
been formed with the promise and 
agreement that “no serious topics” 
will be barred from its discussions. 
The purpose of the new body, known 
as the Student-Faculty-Hospital Ad¬ 
ministration Coordination Commit¬ 
tee, is to improve communication be¬ 
tween the three groups. It meets 
weekly to discuss policy affecting 
students, the medical school and the 
hospital. 


The committee members are the ■ 
four medical class presidents, a rep-| to 
resentative of the students in Epi-j 
demiology and Public Health, and) it 
the president of the Student Council;] il 
Dr. Thomas Forbes and Dr. Howard] ii 
Levitin, associate deans, and Louis] 
Kaplan, assistant to Dean Redlich,, : 
representing the medical faculty; and] ! 
William T. Newell, assistant director] : 
of the hospital, representing the hos-j 
pital administration. 

At one of its first meetings, the 
new committee dealt with questions i 
from students asking the reasons for I 
next year’s tuition increase. Stanley I 
Davis, associate comptroller of the ! 
University for medical affairs, told I 
the committee that while the total 
budget for the medical school next 
year will approximate $26,000,000 
with income from all sources, there 
will still be a deficit approaching one 
and a half million dollars. The tuition 1 
increase will add $100,000 to the 
$800,000 now taken in from student i 
tuition and will defray a portion of i 
the deficit. Mr. Davis said that the ( 
increase in tuition is a Yale Univer¬ 
sity policy decision and reflects the 
increase in tuition in all of the grad- | 
uate schools. It was emphasized that ' 
loan and scholarship appropriations i 
have increased out of proportion to 
the increase in tuition over the past 
several years. 

Faculty Notes 

Dr. Vernon W. Lippard, assistant to 
the president for medical develop¬ 
ment, journeyed to the Far East this 
spring. At the invitation of the new¬ 
ly-formed Association of Philippine 
Medical Colleges, he spent five weeks 
in the Philippines where he visited 
each of the seven medical schools 
and met with their faculties. He also 
addressed the first meeting of the As¬ 
sociation. En route to the Philippines 
he stopped in Japan and spent sever¬ 
al days at the Atomic Bomb Casualty 
Commission in Hiroshima. 

Dr. Morton M. Kligerman, profes¬ 
sor and chairman of the Department 
of Radiology, visited the University 


24 






I 


of Caracas, Venezuela, in February 
to participate in the dedication of a 
new department of radiotherapy at 
the University Hospital. His address 
at the dedication ceremony was de¬ 
livered in Spanish. He also gave two 
clinical lectures on carcinoma of the 
rectum and carcinoma of the lung. 
During his visit Dr. Kligerman was 
made a corresponding member of the 
Venezuelan Radiological Society and 
an honorary member of the Cancer 
Society. 

Dr. David Seligson, professor of 
medicine and pathology and chief of 
Clinical Laboratories, spoke on some 
approaches to automation in the clin¬ 
ical laboratory in a program on “Data 
Processing in Clinical Pathology” 
sponsored by the Lahey Clinic Foun¬ 
dation in Boston on January 25. 

Dr. Jose M. R. Delgado, professor 
of physiology, delivered the annual 
Beaumont Lecture of the Wayne 
County Medical Society in Detroit, 
Michigan, on April 1. He spoke on 
“Reaching for the Mind in the Depths 
of the Brain”. Since 1922 the Society 
has sponsored this event honoring 
William Beaumont (1785-1893), the 
Army surgeon who was a pioneer in¬ 
vestigator of the physiology of diges¬ 
tion. The 1934 lecture was given by 
another Yale professor of physiol¬ 
ogy, Dr. John F. Fulton, who spoke 
on “Some Functions of the Cerebral 
Cortex”. 

New Associate Professor 

Dr. Arne Sollberger was appointed 
associate professor of psychiatry ef¬ 
fective January 1, 1968. He will work 
with the Connecticut Mental Health 
Center to develop a research project 
on biological rhythms and depres¬ 
sive illness. 

After receiving his M.B. and M.D. 
degrees from the Karolinska Insti¬ 
tute in Stockholm, he was a member 
of the faculty there until 1962. He 
then taught at the School of Tropical 
Medicine in Puerto Rico and at West¬ 
ern Reserve University. From 1965 
until the time of his new appoint¬ 
ment, he was chief of the Biometrics 


Section at the Veterans Administra¬ 
tion Eastern Research Support Cen¬ 
ter in West Haven, Connecticut, and 
a lecturer in biometry at Yale. 

New Books 

DEATH IN LIFE: Survivors of Hiro¬ 
shima by Dr. Robert Jay Lifton, Foun¬ 
dations Fund for Research in Psy¬ 
chiatry Professor of Psychiatry. 
(Random House.) Robert Jay Lifton 
is the first person to undertake a 
wide-ranging study of those who sur¬ 
vived the atomic bombing of Hiro¬ 
shima. He interviewed people in 
Hiroshima who had experienced the 
bomb—community leaders, politi¬ 
cians, clergymen, administrators and 
directors of survivor and peace move¬ 
ment groups, medical personnel, 
scholars, writers, artists, foreigners 
resident in the city, and visitors to it. 
Quotations from these interviews, 
interwoven with the taut and coolly 
analytic narrative provide insight in¬ 
to survivors' struggles and problems: 
fear of physical aftereffects in them¬ 
selves or their children, continuing 
“immersion in death” and death 
imagery, feelings of guilt over having 
survived while others died, the abil¬ 
ity or lack of it to function as they 
had prior to the bomb. The extraor¬ 
dinary vividness of the memories 
of those he interviewed is a testa¬ 
ment to the enormity of the event's 
effect on their personal lives and 
on the life of the city. Dr. Lifton’s 
interpretation of the patterns that 
emerged from the interviews clearly 
delineates the universality of re¬ 
sponse. He also discusses the effects 
of the experience on intellectuals. 
Using examples from various art 
forms—literature, poetry, painting, 
films, music—Dr. Lifton shows how 
the A-bomb experience continues to 
haunt and elude those who seek to 
deal with it creatively. The analysis 
is extended to include comparisons 
of A-bomb and concentration-camp 
survival, and finally survival of 
any “end-of-the-world” experience 
whose impact can be viewed as the 
general psychology of the survivor 


in our time. The author has spent al¬ 
most seven years in the Far East, in¬ 
cluding the period from 1960 to 1962, 
during which he carried out a study 
of psychological patterns in Japanese 
youth as well as the research for this 
volume. 

SICKNESS AND SOCIETY by Dr. 
Raymond S. Duff, associate profes¬ 
sor of pediatrics and sociology, and 
August deB. Hollingshead, William 
Graham Sumner Professor of Sociol¬ 
ogy. (Harper & Row.) This volume is 
the result of a five-year study of the 
behavior of persons involved in the 
care of patients in an unnamed but 
easily identifiable medical center. 
Using data collected through exten¬ 
sive interviewing between 1960 and 
1964, the authors describe the drama 
of sickness enacted by patients, their 
families, hospital administrators, 
nurses, community physicians, and 
the faculty and students of a medical 
school. 

Dean F. C. Redlich has written a 
foreword to Sickness and Society in 
which he says, in part: 

“This book focuses on the rela¬ 
tionship between the care of hospi¬ 
talized medical and surgical patients 
and the social environment of a uni¬ 
versity and community hospital. Do 
the patients receive optimal care? 
Does the social system hinder or en¬ 
hance such care? Is the psychosocial 
environment sufficiently considered 
in rendering such care? 

“By studying the medical care of 
three ‘social classes’ of patients— 
those in ward, semiprivate, and pri¬ 
vate accommodations—through de¬ 
tailed interviews and observations, 
the authors provide answers to these 
questions. I do not agree with all 
their answers, and I do not agree 
with some of their implicit assump¬ 
tions. It is impossible for me to ac¬ 
cept the fact that medical teaching 
and research are not compatible with 
good medical care. I do not believe 
that an inherent antagonism exists 
among physicians, hospital adminis¬ 
trators, and nurses or that hospitals 
are run for the benefit of physicians. 


25 





When the authors describe the awe¬ 
some, complex, and often confused 
transactions among patients, fami¬ 
lies, and members of the health pro¬ 
fessions, the reader may draw an un¬ 
necessarily negative picture; yet the 
main message of the book is power¬ 
ful, clear, and essentially correct: the 
patient's care is far from what it 
could and should be! Possibly one of 
the most alarming aspects of this re¬ 
port is the fact that the medical cen¬ 
ter under scrutiny has been ranked 
nationally among the best. It is safe 
to assume that the conditions de¬ 
scribed in this report prevail in other 
centers and that these problems are 
by no means the result of local in¬ 
efficiency or lassitude.” 

Ethereal Debauch 

The author of the following letter is 
research associate in the history of 
science and medicine at Yale. 

To the Editors of Yale Medicine: 

In view of your timely, factual, and 
provocative report on research into 
hallucinogens in the Winter issue, 
you might find of interest an account 
of the experiments of an earlier 
group of Yale students with a power¬ 
ful and then little-known chemical 
agent—ether. 

The following quotation is taken 
from the introductory lecture of a 
professor in the Medical School on 
14 September 1871—Benjamin Silli- 
man, Jr. Professor of chemistry in 
Yale College as well, as his father 
had been before him, an editor of the 
distinguished American Journal of 
Science and Arts, a founder of the 
Yale Scientific School (Sheffield), al¬ 
so one of the incorporating members 
of the National Academy of Sciences, 
Silliman was a scientist with an in¬ 
ternational reputation. His report on 
laboratory experiments with samples 
of oil from a Pennsylvania site pub¬ 
lished in 1855 led to the drilling of 
the first well and the launching of 
the petroleum industry. He was thus 
well equipped to speak on ‘‘A Cen¬ 
tury of Chemistry and Medicine.” 
Another illustration of the same prin¬ 


ciple in matters of observation is 
within the personal knowledge of the 
writer, who during the years 1835-40 
[Silliman was Yale ’37] had frequent 
occasion to observe the effects of a 
general and profuse exhibition of 
ether to hundreds of Academical 
Students for the purpose of a frolic. 
This kind of ethereal debauch was 
carried on for some time in the open 
fields about New Haven, and in the 
presence of hundreds of spectators 
—the wildest exhibitions of excite¬ 
ment being often manifested—but in 
no case was the anaesthesia, as such, 
observed, although the inhalation 
was often carried up to the point of 
insensibility. It is true none but a 
skilled professional man was pre¬ 
pared to recognize the phenomena 
of anmsthesia, even when it existed 
in the most unequivocal condition; 
and when the existence of this physi¬ 
cal state was as yet practically un¬ 
known, how could it be discerned by 
a crowd of youthful unprofessional 
observers? If it is true that what we 
find is often better than what we 
seek, it is equally true that it may 
require more sagacity to see what is 
found than it does to direct a search 
for a definite object. 

Perhaps some other professor of 
chemistry a hundred years hence 
will be able to observe that what 
we found was better than what we 
sought. 

Elizabeth H. Thomson 
29 March 1968 

British Phrenological 
Society Gift 

A number of 19th century volumes, 
some 120 in all, from the Library of 
the British Phrenological Society, 
Inc., of Great Britain have been 
added to the Yale Medical Library’s 
holdings on phrenology through the 
mediation of Dr. Edwin Clarke, Uni¬ 
versity College, London, and Mr. 
Francis E. McGovern, Yale B.A. 1967. 
The Society, having gone out of exis¬ 
tence, gave Yale those volumes from 
its library which are not already rep¬ 
resented in the Yale collections. 


Alumni Honored 

Two alumni of Yale School of Medi¬ 
cine were among the twenty-five in¬ 
dividuals appointed Markle Scholars 
in Academic Medicine for 1968-73. 
These five-year scholarships of the 
John and Mary Markle Foundation, 
to aid young medical scientists plan¬ 
ning careers in academic medicine, 
are considered a most distinguished 
honor. 

The alumni are Dr. Jack Levin 
(’57), who is currently an assistant 
professor of medicine at the Johns 
Hopkins University School of Medi¬ 
cine, and Dr. John C. Parker (’61) an 
assistant professor of medicine at the 
University of North Carolina School 
of Medicine. 

Going to the A.M.A. Convention? 

The Association of Yale Alumni in 
Medicine will sponsor a cocktail 
party at the A.M.A. Annual Conven¬ 
tion in San Francisco in June. All 
alumni, faculty, and former house 
staff are invited and are welcome to 
bring their wives and friends. 

The gathering will be held on Mon¬ 
day, June 17, at 6:00 p.m. at the Fair¬ 
mont Hotel. No tickets are required 
as it will be a pay-as-you-drink party. 
If you plan to attend the 1968 A.M.A. 
Convention, meet your friends at the 
Yale Medical Alumni Cocktail Party. 


Just as this issue was going 
to press, we received the 
sad news of the death of 
Dr. Grover F. Powers, our 
beloved professor emeritus 
of pediatrics. 


26 









j 

Alumni News 


Two classes will hold 25-year reunions on June 8. Wartime acceleration in 
1943 produced the March graduates (above) and the December graduates 
(below.) 


27 












1924 

At a commemorative ceremony cele¬ 
brating the two hundredth anniver¬ 
sary of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of Columbia University in 
November, 1967, D. ANTHONY 
D’ESOPO was presented with the 
Silver Bicentennial Medallion for 
outstanding and distinguished con¬ 
tributions in the field of obstetrics 
and gynecology. Dr. D'Esopo, who 
joined the Department of Obstetrics 
and Gynecology at Columbia in 1925 
remains one of the most respected 
and revered professors at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. 

1935 

AVERILL A. LIEBOW has joined the 
faculty of the University of Califor¬ 
nia San Diego School of Medicine as 
chairman of the Department of Path¬ 
ology. He made the move to Califor¬ 
nia this spring. With the exception of 
military service in World War II, Dr. 
Liebow has been a member of the 
Yale faculty since 1937 and professor 
of pathology since 1951. He was ap¬ 
pointed John Slade Ely Professor of 
Pathology at Yale in 1957. 

1938 

NELSON K. ORDWAY left Yale last 
September to join the faculty of the 
University of Oklahoma where he is 
professor of pediatrics and public 
health with appointments both in the 
Department of Pediatrics of the 
School of Medicine and in the new 
School of Health. He recently wrote 
as follows regarding his new posi¬ 
tion: “The University of Oklahoma 
has long had interest in education 
and service in Latin America and has 
organized a group of universities in 
this region into a consortium. The 
Department of Public Health in the 
School of Medicine has been active 
in India and Viet Nam. My job here 
will be to develop a program in in¬ 
ternational child health which will 
probably take the form initially of an 
affiliating relationship with the de¬ 
partment of pediatrics of a school of 
medicine in Latin American which 
will serve as a basis for exchange at 
various levels and in both directions 
and open doors to other possibilities 
and opportunities. Eventually I 
would hope that such affiliations 
might be established both in Spanish 


and Portuguese Latin America. Plans 
for the improvement of health edu¬ 
cation and services on various re¬ 
gional levels are advancing rapidly 
under the leadership of JOSE FELIX 
PATINO (’52), now Executive Direc¬ 
tor of the Pan American Federation 
of Associations of Medical Schools, 
and involvement in some aspect of 
these developing programs would 
appear to have great promise.” 

1940 

FRANCIS X. SOMMER of Barbour- 
ville, Kentucky, was honored on 
February 18 by a Community Rec¬ 
ognition Program sponsored by Bar- 
bourville Kiwanis Club, Knox County 
Chamber of Commerce, and Knoxco 
Improvement Corporation in recog¬ 
nition of the round-the-world flight 
by Dr. Sommer and Dr. John Rieger. 
In an address on that occasion, Mah- 
lon A. Miller, president of Union Col¬ 
lege, stated: “One of the important 
reasons why we are here tonight is 
to say to Dr. Sommer, ‘Cy, thanks for 
setting such a good example for us. 
You were not content just to learn 
how to fly. You were not satisfied 
until—quite literally—all the world 
could see you were an expert flyer. 
That is a good example for all of us, 
whatever our occupation or profes¬ 
sion might be.’ 

“I have said to more than one per¬ 
son around town that the day I had 
my first flight with Dr. Sommer in 
Mike Dog, I decided then and there 
that if I ever needed surgery, I would 
not hesitate to place my life in his 
hands. If he is as knowledgeable and 
skillful in the operating room as he 
is in the cockpit of a plane, I would 
have no fears. From the standpoint 
of training and experience, I have 
every reason to believe he is an even 
better surgeon than he is a pilot, and 
that is saying a lot. 

“Whatever you are going to be, be 
a good one! This is basic to high ad¬ 
venture. We can thank Dr. Sommer 
for the example he has given us.” 

The round-the-world flight in a 
single engine Beechcraft Bonanza 
aircraft was described in the fall 
1967 issue of Yale Medicine under 
Alumni News, 1940. 

1941 

WILLIAM LEE, medical director of 
The Stanley Works in New Britain, 



Connecticut, has been named “Phy¬ 
sician of the Year” by the Governor’s 
Committee on Employment of the 
Handicapped and is the recipient of 
President Johnson’s Committee on 
Employment of the Handicapped 
Award which states: “Citation for 
meritorious service conferred upon 
Dr. William Lee in appreciation for 
exceptional contributions in further¬ 
ing the employment of the handi¬ 
capped.” The award was presented 
at a dinner in his honor given by the 
New Britain - Plainville - Berlin Area 
Employ the Handicapped Committee 
on February 14. 

The Area Committee and the Gov¬ 
ernor’s Committee made note of his j 
endless hours devoted to the estab¬ 
lishment of the Constructive Work¬ 
shop for the handicapped in New i 
Britain, for his service as past presi- 1 
dent of the Mental Health Associa- I 
tion of Central Connecticut, and as a j 
past member of the professional ad¬ 
visory committee and board of direc- i 
tors of the Connecticut Association > 
for Mental Health. Also for his ac- | 
tivities in the Connecticut Heart As- | 
sociation and as chairman of the j 
Cardiac in Industry Committee 
which became the Rehabilitation 
Committee while he was chairman. 

Following his residency in surgery 
at Hartford Hospital, Dr. Lee was 
with the Lago Oil and Transport 
Company (Standard Oil) in Aruba, 
Netherlands Antilles, until he joined 
the Stanley Works in 1951 as assis¬ 
tant medical director. He was ap¬ 
pointed medical director in 1954. 

1943 March 

ROGER W. DAVIS has been ap¬ 
pointed assistant medical director, 
corporate services division, at Aetna 
Life and Casualty. Previously in pri¬ 
vate practice of orthopedics in the 


28 










I 



Dr. Davis 


■ Hartford area, Dr. Davis was a staff 
i member at Hartford Hospital and 
! Newington Children’s Hospital. He 
is a member of the American Acad¬ 
emy of Orthopedic Surgeons. 


1944 

LAWRENCE K. PICKETT has been 
appointed to a key volunteer position 
on the Yale Alumni Fund. He will 
! serve as assistant chairman for grad¬ 
uate and professional schools. In this 
newly created post, he will be re¬ 
sponsible for coordinating the an¬ 
nual alumni fund raising for all of 
Yale’s graduate and professional 
schools except the Law School. 

Dr. Pickett has been a Yale Alumni 
Fund agent for his college class for 
many years and has served as a re¬ 
gional worker for the Medical School 
Alumni Fund. He is also a member 
of the newly organized Alumni in 
Medicine (AIM) campaign cabinet 
and was president of the Association 
of Yale Alumni in Medicine from 
1965 to 1967. 

1946 

TED A. LOOMIS is the author of a 
new book Essentials of Toxicology 
published by Lea & Febiger in Janu¬ 
ary. Dr. Loomis is professor of phar¬ 
macology at the University of Wash¬ 
ington School of Medicine in Seattle 
and state toxicologist. 

DONALD P. SHEDD visited India, 
Pakistan, and Ceylon during the end 
of January and early February of this 
year. He was a member of a three- 
man U.S. Public Health Service team 
to survey ongoing and proposed oral 
cancer research projects in those 
countries. Dr. Shedd, who is chief of 
the Department of Head and Neck 
Surgery at the Roswell Park Memo¬ 
rial Institute in Buffalo, New York, 


is a consultant to the Cancer Control 
Branch of the USPHS. 

1947 

ARTHUR H. CHAPMAN is the au¬ 
thor of a new book on psychiatry. 
Designed for laymen, it is entitled 
PUT OFFS AND COME ONS. Psy¬ 
chological Maneuvers and Strate- 
gems. It will be published this spring 
by G. P. Putnam’s Sons of New York. 
Oo November 15, 1967, IGOR TAMM 
was awarded the Alfred Benzon 
Prize in Copenhagen, Denmark, “in 
recognition of his outstanding re¬ 
search on the replication of viruses.” 
This is the third year the honor has 
been given, and he is the first Ameri¬ 
can recipient. 

Following presentation of the prize 
by Professor J. Hess Thaysen of the 
University of Copenhagen, Dr. Tamm 
delivered the Alfred Benzon Lecture 
to an audience of chemists, microbi¬ 
ologists, pharmacologists, and other 
scientists and physicians. He dis¬ 
cussed the replication and virus-cell 
interaction of certain selected vi¬ 
ruses. 

Following his internship and assis¬ 
tant residency in medicine at the 
Grace-New Haven Community Hos¬ 
pital in 1949, Dr. Tamm joined the 
faculty of The Rockefeller Institute 
for Medical Research, now The 
Rockefeller University. He was 
named professor and senior physi¬ 
cian in 1964. 

His early studies, begun at Yale, 
concerned the interaction of influen¬ 
za viruses with receptor substances. 
In 1950 he discovered and character¬ 
ized, with Dr. Frank L. Horsfall, Jr., 
a mucoprotein which was the first 
pure substrate for influenza virus 



neuraminidase. More recently, Dr. 
Tamm has been concerned with the 
biochemistry and virus-cell relation¬ 
ship of a number of animal viruses. 

OLIVE E. PITKIN was appointed di¬ 
rector of school health by the New 
York City Department of Health in 
November, 1967. She had served as 
assistant director of school health 
since October, 1966. The Bureau of 
School Health is staffed by five full¬ 
time and approximately 350 part- 
time physicians. It is responsible for 
the health supervision of almost 
1,500,000 children in the city’s public 
and parochial schools. 



Dr. Pitkin, who is a diplomate of 
the American Board of Pediatrics 
and a member of the American Pub¬ 
lic Health Association, holds an ap¬ 
pointment as clinical instructor in 
pediatrics at Cornell University Med¬ 
ical College and is an assistant pedia¬ 
trician to the outpatient department 
at The New York Hospital. She lives 
in Manhattan with her husband, Dr. 
IGOR TAMM, and their three chil¬ 
dren. 

1952 

In a recent note to Associate Dean 
Forbes, MARVIN H. GOLDBERG 
wrote as follows: “We’re now living 
in La Jolla with a lovely house by the 
sea. I’m still with the Permanente 
Med Group. We just opened an office 
and hospital in San Diego. Our chief 
of OB is MYRON NOBIL, Yale Med 
’47, and one of our surgeons is STU¬ 
ART BOWNE, Yale ’60. We love San 
Diego. I am on the faculty of the new 
University of California San Diego 
Med School. BOB HAMBURGER 
(’51) is the asst, dean, A. LIEBOW 
(’35) will be chief of pathology. This 
certainly will be Yale territory.” 


29 







Dr. Minners fright) with Dr. Gobezie 

1957 

HOWARD A. MINNERS, who is spe¬ 
cial assistant to the director of the 
Office of International Research at 
the National Institutes of Health, 
completed a month’s trip in East 
Africa early this year. During his 
visit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, he 
met Dr. Gebre Christos Gobezie, who 
had spent the year 1965-66 in New 
Haven and was postdoctoral fellow 
in medicine (gastroenterology) with 
Dr. Howard Spiro. 

Dr. Minners sent the accompany¬ 
ing photograph and noted, “For near¬ 
ly an hour, I discussed several as¬ 
pects of medical practice in Ethiopia 
with Dr. Gobezie in his office which 
was located just around the corner 
from my hotel.” 

1959 

ASA BARNES, in a recent letter from 
Long Binh Post, Vietnam, writes: 
“Before coming to Vietnam in De¬ 
cember I passed my board exams in 
anatomic and clinical pathology. At 
present I’m commander of a labora¬ 
tory-unit which supports two evac 
hospitals and innumerable dispen¬ 
saries and is the subdepot for blood 
distribution . . . As a consultant I 
helicopter around quite a bit. It is 
interesting and sometimes exciting. 
I am appalled by the war but proud 
of the medical care our wounded 
soldiers receive.” He notes that he 


will be unable to write his class 
newsletter this year but hopes to in 
1969. 

A note last fall in a Southern Cali¬ 
fornia newspaper the Daily Pilot re¬ 
ports ‘‘Doctor Discovers Lots of 
Knots for Study.” It tells of an inves¬ 
tigation of surfer’s knots being con¬ 
ducted by MIKE McCABE at Hunt¬ 
ington Beach, “where more knots 
than nuts at a peanut butter factory 
were in evidence last weekend.” Dr. 
McCabe is a resident in radiology at 
Orange County Medical Center in 
Orange, California. He’s also a surfer. 
DAVID SKINNER has been dis¬ 
charged from the Air Force and is 
now an assistant professor of sur¬ 
gery at the Johns Hopkins University 
School of Medicine. The Skinners’ 
new address is 8307 Carrbridge Cir¬ 
cle, Baltimore. During his two years 
in the Air Force, Dr. Skinner was 
stationed in San Antonio doing sur¬ 
gical research at the School of Aero¬ 
space Medicine, and surgery and 
teaching at Wilford Hall Air Force 
Hospital. In August and September 
of last year, he travelled to Europe 
visiting Amsterdam, Rome, Vienna, 
and Bristol, England, for lectures and 
meetings. 

LEO H. VON EULER has been ap¬ 
pointed program administrator for 
research training in pathology with 
the Research Training Grants Branch 


of the National Institute of Genera 
Medical Sciences at the National In¬ 
stitutes of Health in Bethesda, Mary¬ 
land. He previously was working ir 
biochemistry at the National Insti¬ 
tute of Arthritis and Metabolic Dis¬ 
eases, NIH. 

MURIEL DU BROW WOLF is asso¬ 
ciate director of the outpatient de¬ 
partment and associate cardiologist 
at Children’s Hospital, Washington, 
D.C. She also has an appointment as 
an assistant professor of pediatrics 
at Georgetown University School of 
Medicine. Her husband, Dick, a law¬ 
yer, does the labor and civil rights 
law for NASA. The Wolfs have two 
daughters, Anne, two and a half, and 
Jennifer, a year and a half. 

1960 

FESTUS ADEBONOJO is now a part-1 
ner in the Permanente Medicali 
Group in San Rafael, California. His j 
wife, Mary, has received her M. A. i 
degree in anthropology and folklore 1 
from the University of California in j 
Berkeley. The Adebonojos have 
three sons. 

STANLEY M. K. CHUNG was re¬ 
cently discharged from the Air Force | 
and is now an instructor in ortho¬ 
pedic surgery at the University of 
Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 
Philadelphia. He had been stationed 
at Keesler Air Force Base Hospital 
and writes that there were two other 
Yale medical alumni there, JOSEPH 
DANNEMILLER (’57), and EDWARD 
LANG (’60). 

1961 

J. RICHARD LUSBY, who is with the 
Group Health Cooperative in Seattle, 
Washington, is on the attending staff 
at Children’s Orthopedic Hospital 
and is an assistant instructor in pedi¬ 
atrics at the University Hospital. His 
wife, Maryann, writes, “After about 
nine years of moving around we have 
found a lovely home of our own here 
on Mercer Island and are very happy 
to be settled.” The Lusbys have three 
children, Bobby, Linda, and Michael. 

1962 

DAVID E. SEIL has been appointed 
an assistant in psychiatry at the Har¬ 
vard Medical School. He is associ¬ 
ated with College Center in Boston. 


30 






j 

I 


1965 

VICTOR ). BURNER is currently a 
resident in surgery at Mount Zion 
Hospital, San Francisco, 

DAVID G. CAMPBELL, who is cur¬ 
rently serving in the U.S. Navy, has 
recently been transferred from Pen¬ 
sacola and is now stationed at Quon- 
set Point, Rhode Island. 

PUBLIC HEALTH 

1956 

GEORGE R. WALKER has been ap¬ 
pointed coordinator for comprehen¬ 
sive health planning in the Connecti¬ 
cut State Department of Health. In 
his new post, he will be responsible 
for the development of the state’s 
comprehensive health services and 
will work closely with the Govern¬ 
or’s Council on Comprehensive 
Health Planning. The project will be 
financed through federal funds 
which provide grants to study and 
coordinate all types of health serv¬ 
ices. Prior to this appointment, Dr. 
Walker practiced in Bangor, Maine, 
for eleven years. 



Dr. Eisenberg 


1957 

The Bronze Medal Award, the high¬ 
est honor of the Connecticut Divi¬ 
sion, American Cancer Society, was 
presented to HENRY EISENBERG 
on January 18. Given annually to a 
Connecticut resident for “outstand¬ 
ing service to the cause of fighting 
cancer,” the award recognizes Dr. 
Eisenberg’s “significant contribution 
in developing and utilizing data” of 
the pioneering Connecticut Tumor 
Registry which he has administered 
for the past fourteen years. Dr. Eis¬ 
enberg, who is chief of the Chronic 


Disease Control Section of the Con¬ 
necticut State Department of Health, 
has served in many volunteer capaci¬ 
ties with the Connecticut Division of 
the American Cancer Society and is 
a member of its executive committee. 
He is also an expert cancer consul¬ 
tant to the World Health Organiza¬ 
tion and a consultant to the Inter¬ 
national Agency of Research and 
Cancer. He is a lecturer in public 
health (chronic disease) in the De¬ 
partment of Epidemiology and Public 
Health at Yale and also a lecturer at 
the Johns Hopkins University School 
of Hygiene and Public Health. 

HOUSE STAFF 

1961 

JOSEPH A. SISSON was appointed 
chairman of the Pathology Depart¬ 
ment at the Creighton University 
School of Medicine effective January 
1, 1968, and also director of pathol¬ 
ogy at Creighton Memorial Saint 
Joseph’s Hospital in Omaha, Nebra¬ 
ska. After completion of his intern¬ 
ship in pathology at Yale-New Haven 
Medical Center in 1961, Dr. Sisson 
was a resident in pathology at the 
Albany Medical Center Hospital and 
then served on the faculty at Albany 
Medical College. Prior to his present 
appointment he was attending path¬ 
ologist at the Veterans Administra¬ 
tion Hospital in Albany. His major 
scientific interests are amino acid 
and lipid metabolism in pregnancy 
and the biochemical aspects of 
atherosclerosis and thrombosis. 


Picture Credits Robert Perron: cover: Paul E. 
L. Kirchner, p. 2; A. Burton Street, p. 4; Kiyoshi 
Takasugi, M.D., p. 9; Yale University News 
Bureau, pp, 9, 24; Arthur Ebbert, Jr.. M.D., p. 10; 
Morris Warman, pp. 11, 12, 13; Bernard Beitman, 
pp. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20; Rockefeller Institute, p. 29. 


31 



' 










Medical Alumni Day 
Saturday, June 8, 1968 


Registration — Medical Library, Sterling Hall of Medicine 


9:00 - 11:00 
9:30 - 12:00 
9:30 - 10:45 

11:00 - 12:00 

12:30- 1:30 
2:00- 4:00 


4:00- 6:00 


Coffee Service for Alumni — Beaumont Room 

Open House — Departments of Anatomy, Pediatrics, and Radiology 
Surgical Conference — Fitkin Amphitheater 
Subject: Trauma 

Medical-Pediatric Conference — Mary S. Harkness Memorial Auditorium 
Subject: Chronic Renal Disease 

Buffet Luncheon for Alumni, Wives and Faculty — Edward S. Harkness Memorial Hall 
Special Program for Alumni and Guests — Mary S. Harkness Memorial Auditorium 
Welcome and Introductory Remarks 

Dr. Benjamin Castleman (’31], President, Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 
Dr. F. C. Redlich, Dean, Yale School of Medicine 

Dr. Leona Baumgartner (’34), General Chairman, Alumni in Medicine Campaign 
Drugs in Our Society 
Dr. Paul Talalay (’48] 

Chairman, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 
Social and Academic Responsibilities of Medical Schools 
Dr. Donald W. Seldin (’43] 

Chairman, Department of Internal Medicine 
The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School 
Medical Education: Preparation for Tomorrow 
Dr. Louis G. Welt (’38] 

Chairman, Department of Medicine 
The University of North Carolina School of Medicine 
Social Hour for Alumni, Wives and Faculty — Edward S. Harkness Memorial Hall 


All alumni of the School of Medicine, active faculty, and former house staff 
of the Grace-New Haven Community Hospital (Yale-New Haven Hospital] 
are members of the Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine and are invited 
to attend this June Alumni Day Program. 

Individual class parties and dinners for the five-year reunion classes (’23, '28, 
’33, ’38, ’43 (Dec.], ’43 (Mar.], ’48, '53, ’58, ’63] will be held in the evening. 
Information will be available at the Alumni Registration Desk. 





YALE MEDICINE 


NON-PROFIT ORG. 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

New Haven, Conn. 
Permit No. 8 


ARE YOU MOVING IN JULY ? 

Please send us your new address so that the mailing list for 

YALE MEDICINE 
can be kept up to date 


333 Cedar Street 
New Haven, Conn. 06510 












YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE / FALL 1968 








COVER: Edward /. Qui/iigan, M.D , believes in the right of every child to be well born. An article by Dr. Quiliigan, 
chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, begins on page 3. fPhotographed by Robert Perron./ 



YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE / FALL 1968 / VOL. 3 NO. 3 


Contents 


The Obstetrician — Now to 1984 by Edward J. Quilligan, M.D. 3 
Alumni Day 1968 6 

William Beaumont 8 

Physiologist and Obstetrician 15 

In and About Sterling Hall 21 

Alumni News 29 


YALE MEDICINE is published three times a year—in the fall, winter, and 
spring — and is distributed to members of the Association of Yale Alumni in 
Medicine, students, and others interested in the School of Medicine. Com¬ 
munications may be addressed to The Editor, Room L200, 333 Cedar Street, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 06510. 


Editor Arthur Ebbert, Jr., M.D. 

Managing Editor Kate Swift 
Assistant Managing Editor Anne S. Bittker 
Designer Sarah P. Sullivan 
Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 
Benjamin Castleman, M.D., ’31, President 
George A. Carden, II, M.D., '35, Vice-President 
Robert F. Bradley, Jr., M.D., '43, Secretary 
Lawrence K. Pickett, M.D., '44, Past President 

Executive Committee 
Philip S. Brezina, M.D., ’40 
William B. Kiesewetter, M.D., ’49hs 
Eric W. Mood ’43mph 
Richard D. Otis, M.D., ’49 
Michael A. Puzak, M.D., ’42 
Richmond W. Smith, Jr., M.D., '42 





“■ • • the population explosion with its potential for mass starvation and a land hunger 
by exploding nations which could make today’s and even yesterday's conflagrations 
seem minor . . 







1 


j 

The Obstetrician — Now to 1984 

I have chosen this somewhat Orwellian period for a 
variety of reasons. First, 1 believe the next sixteen 
years will be a very critical period for both obstetrics 
and the world in general. Equating obstetrics with solu¬ 
tions to world problems may seem the height of con¬ 
ceit for an obstetrician; however, one of the world’s 
major problems is the population explosion with its po¬ 
tential for mass starvation and a land hunger by ex¬ 
ploding nations which could make today's and even 
yesterday's conflagrations seem minor, indeed. While 
population problems are not solely the property of ob¬ 
stetrics, every thinking obstetrician must in good con¬ 
science strive for breakthroughs in this area on local, 
national, or international levels, either through patient 
care, education, or basic research. The recent decline 
in the number of births in this country would at first 
glance seem to portend an optimistic future for our 
own population problems; however, before we become 
too overjoyed at our prospects at home, perhaps we 
should examine the problem a bit more deeply. 

If we look at those families from the poverty pockets 
who can least afford to support large families, the image 
becomes dismal. Some areas have birth rates as high as 
those of underdeveloped countries. This is the picture 
in one of the most prosperous countries in the world—• 
a country in which communication by newspapers, 
magazines, radio and television should, and generally 
does, permit an intensive campaign for limitation of 
family size. We also, seemingly, have available to our 
public ample numbers of contraceptive methodologies. 

Obviously, the efforts to limit the size of the family 
even in segments of this country, let alone the world 
generally, are not sufficient. Why? Two reasons seem 
paramount. The first has perhaps been neglected for 
too long: that is, the motivation for achieving a certain 
family size. Motivations, such as desire for a male heir 
and need to demonstrate virility, have been described 
but not extensively investigated. Some obstetricians as 
well as psychiatrists, psychologists, and sociologists 
must concern themselves immediately with motiva¬ 
tional drives determining family size. The drives to¬ 
wards large family size must be determined, but more 
importantly and certainly more difficult, studies must 
be done to learn how to direct those drives to a smaller 
family size. This type of effort obviously must proceed 


Dr. Quilligan is professor and chairman of the Depart¬ 
ment of Obstetrics and Gynecology. This article is based 
on a talk he gave at the University of Mississippi Medi¬ 
cal Center in May, 1968. 


by E. j. Quilligan, M.D. 

on a global plane since the motivation in India may be 
totally different than in Ohio. 

I chose to place motivation ahead of contraceptive 
methodology, not necessarily to degrade the importance 
of methodology, but to indicate that no matter how 
effective the method may be, unless one lives in a total¬ 
itarian state motivation is the key to success. 

The second reason for lack of success is that an ideal 
contraceptive is not available even though research has 
made great strides in the past few years. Perhaps a 
definition of the ideal contraceptive will permit delinea¬ 
tion of the weaknesses of present-day methodology and 
give a goal toward which our 1984 obstetrician might 
strive. To be considered perfect a contraceptive must 
prevent conception 99 per cent of the time, yet be in¬ 
stantly reversible so the patient may become pregnant 
when she wishes. It must entail little or no effort on the 
patient’s part, and have no side effects. This obviously 
is a large order and one which none of our contracep¬ 
tives comes close to filling. The pill, while almost 99 
per cent effective and, in most instances, readily reversi¬ 
ble to permit pregnancy with its discontinuance, does 
require a certain amount of effort on the patient’s part. 
Further, it does have side effects, some of which are 
serious, such as thromboembolic phenomena and pos¬ 
sibly breast cancer, and some merely annoying, such as 
nausea, water retention, and breast fibrocytic disease. 

The intrauterine devices are not as effective (97 per 
cent); have a high rejection rate (10-15 per cent); and 
have some annoying side effects, such as intermenstrual 
bleeding, as well as some serious side effects including 
infection which has been known to be fatal. 

Some of the low dose progestins injected with silastic 
coverings may solve many of the problems previously 
mentioned. However, there remains a large amount of 
work for our 1984 obstetrician. He must develop a bet¬ 
ter understanding of such rudimentary phenomena as 
sperm capacitation; sperm migration through cervical 
mucus, uterus, and tube; sperm penetration of the zona 
pellucida and ovum membrane. Only through such un¬ 
derstanding can really effective methods of contracep¬ 
tion be developed. 

Research in this area is currently being conducted in 
Yale’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology by Dr. 
John McL. Morris and Dr. Robert H. Glass. Their studies 
involve investigations of sperm capacitation under dif¬ 
fering conditions, fertilization, and anti-implantation 
compounds. 

When one speaks of population limitation, one should 
note that with a single exception—Ireland, where the 
economic motivation is very high—all countries which 


3 






have been really successful in limiting their rate of 
population growth have liberalized their abortion laws. 
This is a very difficult subject because it has immense 
moral and psychological overtones. Needless to say, the 
abortion laws of 42 states in this country, which per¬ 
mit abortion only to save the life of the mother, are 
archaic and desperately in need of change. This type of 
law leads not only to multiple unwanted pregnancies, 
but to the flourishing illegal abortion business, with its 
tragic consequences of maternal death and sterility. 
There are those who believe that abortion on demand, 
such as is practiced in Hungary and Japan, is the only 
solution to both the problems of over-population and 
criminal abortion. However, I submit for your consider¬ 
ation that it would be foolish for us to adopt this prac¬ 
tice before studying thoroughly the effects of such a 
radical change in those countries that are models. 
Studies of the mental, moral, and national implications 
of abortion on demand should be done now. But this 
is not to say that our antiquated laws should not be 
changed, and immediately. Actually, taking the law out 
of the penal code, as doctors have done, and following 
the model given by the American Law Institute in 
which abortion can be performed to save the life or 
health of the mother, for congenital defects, rape or 
incest, is entirely reasonable from a medical viewpoint. 
I do not think we should delude ourselves that such a 
law will markedly decrease criminal abortion because 
the Swedish experience tells us that it, alone, will not. 
However, in combination with good contraception and 
good education, it should have some impact. 

Neglect of Sex Education 

A specific type of education has been almost totally 
neglected in our society, particularly for the medical 
student and thus the doctor. I refer specifically to sex 
education. Research in sexuality is in the embryonic 
stage and our 1984 physician has a great opportunity to 
make contributions to knowledge. However, interest in 
research and teaching must be developed by making 
the medical student aware of sexual problems. Many 
communities are eager to develop programs of sex edu¬ 
cation for their school system, but the individual who 
should take the lead, the physician, has little or no 
knowledge himself. The youth of America are fed a 
continual diet of sensuality via television, movies, and 
magazines; yet practically none of these children knows 
anything about sexuality. Female desirability is equated 
with bust size and thigh exposure. With the accent on 
sensuality and no knowledge of sexuality, I fail to see 
why everyone is amazed that the rate of illegitimate 




pregnancy is rising to astronomic heights. It is esti 
mated that in Connecticut one out of six girls currently 
in her teens will be pregnant before she marries. 

We might pause here for just a moment to examine! 
illegitimate pregnancy more closely. What happens tc 
the girl who is illegitimately pregnant in our society? Ill 
she is from a wealthy family, she can go to a home foil 
unwed mothers, marry the father or, more likely, ob ! 
tain an abortion. What of the less affluent individual? 
Dr. Philip Sarrel, a resident in our department at Yale a 
few years ago, took a look at 100 clinic teenagers who: 
had become pregnant out of wedlock. These girls were: 
examined over a five-year period and here are the! 
dismal statistics. The 100 girls had 340 pregnancies. : 
Only two or three finished school. Sixty were on relief.! 
Thirty-six married and of those, 27 were later divorced.; 

Salvaging Teen-age Mothers 

Once pregnancy has occurred, can anything be done! 
to salvage a useful and productive member of society?! 
Yes, it can, and Dr. Sarrel, a 1984 physician, did it. He 
mobilized the resources of the New Haven community 
to solve the problem. Through the cooperation of the 
school board, special classes were organized so these | 
girls would not have to miss school. Through hospital 
and medical school cooperation a special clinic was i 
begun, staffed by obstetricians, psychiatrists, pediatri¬ 
cians and social workers, to give the girls optimal physi¬ 
cal and mental care during pregnancy. Group educa¬ 
tional sessions were arranged with a social worker 
and a physician leader so that the girls could discuss 
their problems and be knowledgeable about the bodily 
changes that occur during pregnancy. The girls also 
received instruction in infant care from a pediatrician. 

The results of these intensive efforts have been very 
gratifying. Of the first 150 girls enrolled in this pro¬ 
gram, almost all have remained in school and 12 have 1 
gone on to college or secretarial schools. Several girls 
in the program have married and the marriages appear ! 
to be quite stable. Parenthetically, the father also re¬ 
ceives attention in this program. There have been only 
12 repeat pregnancies, most of which were desired 
pregnancies. A calculation of the number of unwanted 
pregnancies that would have occurred under the con¬ 
ditions existing before the program was begun shows 
that there would have been between 80 and 100. It is 
clear from the Yale study that these girls can be sal- I 
vaged! 

In discussing contraception, abortion, and illegitimate 
pregnancy, we have covered superficially some of the 
major social problems our 1984 obstetrician must face. 


4 










They are, in a very real sense, problems of population 
imitation. However, to perpetuate the human race 
iome children must be born, and the obstetrician must 
issure their mental and physical well-being. In other 
words, as my colleague Dr. Harry S. McGaughey used 
:o say, “Every child has the right to be well born.’’ 
That this is not the case has been emphasized by 
iPresident Johnson. He points out correctly that our 
oerinatal mortality is fourteenth in the world. This is 
explained by some on the grounds that we have a non- 
tiomogeneous population and that the low income 
groups cause a marked rise in the overall perinatal 
mortality. Although the low income families do indeed 
have a very high perinatal mortality, even our high in¬ 
come groups do not have a perinatal mortality that 
matches the best countries in the world (the Nether¬ 
lands and Sweden). 

Further than this, perinatal mortality is only a part of 
the picture and not the most important part either. The 
submerged portion of the iceberg, which can sink fam¬ 
ilies or even societies, are those individuals who do not 
die at birth, but who through damage during pregnancy, 
labor, delivery or the neonatal period, are never able to 
achieve their full potential as productive citizens. We 
have absolutely no idea of the magnitude of this prob¬ 
lem. Let me point out some perhaps obvious facts. We 
have several ways of looking at the intrauterine fetus, 
starting from early pregnancy. These include studies, 
such as those being undertaken at Yale by Dr. Nathan 
G. Kase, of chorionic gonadotrophin, estriol excretion, 
and other hormones produced by the fetus. In addition, 
fetal heart rate recording and fetal scalp sampling for 
fetal acid-base balance have been extensively studied 
to determine their efficiency in predicting the fetal out¬ 
come in terms of life or death. But there have been 
almost no studies of the infants who lived to see how 
they perform in the sixth grade. The one exception is 
the work of Dr. Edward H. Hon of Yale, a pioneer in 
fetal electrocardiographic studies, who is currently fol¬ 
lowing a small group of children to test their perform¬ 
ance on a neurologic and psychologic basis. Other in¬ 
vestigators must follow with similar longitudinal studies. 

Need for More Basic Research 

Much work in fetal neurology at a more basic level 
also needs to be done. Hypoxia is known to cause brain 
damage. Such a simple question as how much for how 
long has not been studied very extensively. There are 
many other unanswered questions of a research nature 
for the 1984 obstetrician; in fact, one of the most excit¬ 
ing facets of the specialty of obstetrics is the myriad 


of unanswered questions that need basic research. 

In this age of revolutions by countries, ethnic and 
racial groups, and students, the physician is not ex¬ 
empt. He is facing a minor revolution by his patients. 
The placards our patients are carrying in this revolt 
say: We want excellent medical care for all segments 
of our population. We want our medical care at a rea¬ 
sonable cost. We want to be educated about disease 
and therapy so that we will know when quality med¬ 
ical care is being received. And we want harmonized 
medical care. This is a large order for the medical pro¬ 
fession to fill, but the alternative to not filling it is 
complete government control of medicine; and then Big 
Brother will really be looking over our shoulder. The 
family physician of yesteryear was the embodiment of 
the humanistic approach to medicine. He gave to his 
patients compassion and understanding in abundance. 
This was the major therapy he had to offer. Unfor¬ 
tunately, too many physicians today forget that he 
cured many patients with such simple therapy. The 
cry of the physician today is “I don’t have time,” and 
this is quite true. The average physician today is a 
harassed, overworked individual who does not spend 
enough time with his family. There are, however, solu¬ 
tions to the problem. In the first place, a patient can 
identify well with more than one medical person. Two 
physicians in partnership can practice medicine from a 
medical and humanistic standpoint better than can two 
solo physicians. Thus, partnerships and groups can 
alleviate some of the problem. Yet, there is a further 
solution and that is the use of trained paramedical per¬ 
sonnel. Many jobs the pfiysician now does can be 
performed efficiently and humanely by paramedical per¬ 
sonnel. In obstetrics, both normal prenatal care and 
normal labor and delivery fall into this category with 
one proviso: that is, that the paramedical personnel are 
supervised by a physician. 

Recent experiences with the nurse-midwifery pro¬ 
gram here at Yale and at other centers demonstrate 
that members of this group can render excellent care 
to the normal patient during pregnancy, labor, and de¬ 
livery. The nurse-midwife or her counterpart, the ob¬ 
stetric assistant, is going to play a very important role 
in 1984 medicine. If this is to be the case, then the 
medical student and obstetric resident must soon be 
trained to work cooperatively and efficiently with such 
personnel. 

There are many challenges ahead for the 1984 obste¬ 
trician; however, from the caliber of student with whom 
I am associated at Yale, I believe those challenges will 
be met. 


5 




Alumni Day 1968 


T he Medical Alumni Day on June 8 was once again 
favored by fine weather. Alumni from all parts of 
the country, medical graduates, public health graduates, 
and former house staff were present to renew friend¬ 
ships and to enjoy a full day of activities. 

During the morning, Trauma was the subject of a Sur¬ 
gical Conference and Chronic Renal Disease was dis¬ 
cussed at the Medical-Pediatric conference. In addition, 
the Departments of Anatomy, Pediatrics, and Radiology 
held open house with tours and special exhibits. The 
buffet luncheon at Edward S. Harkness Hall with um¬ 
brellas and tables on the terrace provided a pleasant 
setting for reunion of friends and former classmates; 
about 250 were present. 

Presiding at the afternoon meeting of the Association 
of Yale Alumni in Medicine, Dr. Benjamin Castleman 
introduced Dean Redlich, who described developments 
at the school during his first year as dean, and Dr. 
Leona Baumgartner, who reported on the Alumni in 
Medicine (AIM) campaign. Following election of two 




Returning alumni who took advantage of the open house tours of depart¬ 
ments included Dr. Claude Bloch, '53 (above , left/ who talked with Dr. 
Morton M. Kiigerman, professor of radiology, about the linear accelerator 
and the von Essen headrest. Dr. James Haralambie, '35 /below, left j and 


Dr. Leon E. Rosenberg, associate professor of pediatrics and medicine, 
discussed the amino acid analyzer used in Dr. Rosenberg’s studies of j 
genetic disease. 

I 

l 


6 



















Dr. Christian Hoclel, research associate, adjusts the electron microscope 
for Dr. Charles A. Hall, Jr., '58, and Mrs. Hall who toured demonstrations 
and exhibits in the Department of Anatomy. (Below) Dr. and Mrs. Fred¬ 
erick M. Lane visited the Historical Library of the medical school. Dr. 
Lane is a member of the Class of ’53. 


new members to the executive committee, Dr. Castle- 
man expressed appreciation to Dr. Jonathan T. Lanman 
(’43) and Dr. Louis E. Silcox (’35) who completed two 
years of service. 

The business meeting was followed by a special pro¬ 
gram of alumni speakers: Dr. Paul Talalay (’48), Dr. 
Donald W. Seldin (Dec. '43), and Dr. Louis G. Welt 
(’38). Their lively and provocative talks were the high¬ 
light of the day and stimulated a great deal of thought 
about the roles of the medical profession and medical 
education in our society. 


Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 
Officers 1968-69 

President 

Benjamin Castleman, M.D. (’31) 

Brookline, Massachusetts 

Vice-President 

George A. Carden, II, M.D. (’35) 

New York City 

Secretary 

Robert F. Bradley, Jr., M.D. (’43) 

Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

Past President 

Lawrence K. Pickett, M.D. (’44) 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Executive Committee 
Philip S. Brezina, M.D. (’40) 

Bristol, Connecticut 

William B. Kiesewetter, M.D. (’49hs) 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Eric W. Mood (’43mph) 

Hamden, Connecticut 

Richard D. Otis, M.D. (’49) 

Bloomfield, Connecticut 

Michael A. Puzak, M.D. (’42) 

Arlington, Virginia 

Richmond W. Smith, Jr., M.D. (’42) 

Grosse Pointe, Michigan 

Chairman, Medical School Alumni Fund 
Daniel F. Harvey, M.D. (’33) 

Hartford, Connecticut 

Representatives to the Alumni Board 
Sawnie R. Gaston, M.D. (’35) 

New York City 
Conrad R. Lam, M.D. (’32) 

Detroit, Michigan 

Charles W. Neuhardt, M.D. (’37) 

Bronxville, New York 

Louis E. Silcox, M.D. (’35) 

Gladwyne, Pennsylvania 


7 

















William Beaumont 



8 












I t would be hard to imagine a more unlikely alliance 
than that of the eminent Dr. William Beaumont and 
voyageur Alexis St. Martin. But once met, their paths 
were to cross and recross and the world of medicine 
would be the beneficiary. Beaumont is often referred to 
as “the father of gastric physiology’’; St. Martin was his 
reluctant laboratory-patient whose open fistula was to 
divulge and confirm a mass of data on digestion and the 
gastric juices. 

William Beaumont came from a family whose ances¬ 
tors in Lebanon, Connecticut, had been thriving farmer- 
landowners of strong religious and political views. Born 
in 1785 and raised on the family property, he had no 
interest in farming. In his early years, he attended the 
town’s common school, showing proficiency in English 
and Latin. At 21, he took leave of his family to travel 
northward without plan or destination but with provi¬ 
sions — a horse-drawn cutter, a barrel of cider and 
$100 — plus a desire to see some part of the world and 
to have an effect for good in it. 

In 1807 he arrived at Champlain, New York, a small 
mill town near the Canadian border, on the Great 
Chazy River. Beaumont settled here and applied to the 
village trustees to teach at the local school. For three 
years, his winters were spent educating the youth of 
Champlain; his summers, clerking in the village store; 
and every evening, reading in medical books borrowed 
from the library of Dr. Seth Pomeroy, a highly regarded 
practitioner in nearby Burlington, Vermont. Beaumont's 
introduction to medical learning crystallized his plans 
for the future. He would teach until he had sufficient 
funds to underwrite the two-year apprenticeship re¬ 
quired to obtain a medical certificate. In 1810 he was 
accepted by Dr. Benjamin Chandler of St. Albans. 
Chandler, a gifted surgeon, not only undertook the 
instruction of young Beaumont but gave him room and 
lodging. He systematically drilled his own son as well 
as his boarder in such medical fundamentals as symp¬ 
toms, diagnoses, the writing of prescriptions and the 
arts of cupping and bleeding. Beaumont repaid his 
teacher and host by sweeping the office, washing bot¬ 
tles, making up pills and assisting in operations. He 
also began the practice of keeping a detailed notebook 


Opposite: William Beaumont, surgeon in the U.S. Army, who has been 
remembered at the School of Medicine through the establishment of the 
Beaumont Medical Club and the Beaumont Room, came to New Haven 
only once: for the purpose of consulting Dr. Benjamin Silliman on the 
identification of certain chemicals found in gastric juices. This painting, 
a gift of the Beaumont Medical Club, was executed by Deane Keller from 
a daguerreotype. 


and medical journal, a procedure which he continued 
throughout much of his professional life. Entered in the 
journals were his personal observations, often-used 
prescriptions, notes on important diseases, and remarks 
on matters medical, either quoted by his teacher or 
selected from his reading. 

/“Sept. 8th 1912 — Quit my Precepter, Doc Benjn Chan¬ 
dler, St. Albans, Vt. under whose friendly inspection & 
instruction I happily pursued my medical studies for 2 
years, to my own satisfaction & that of my Precepter...”/ 

Having completed his apprenticeship, he was granted 
a license to practice by the Third Medical Society of 
the State of Vermont. The outbreak of the War of 1812 
led him to enlist as a surgeon’s mate. He was attached 
to the 16th Regiment of the infantry at Plattsburgh, 
then transferred in November with a division to Sack- 
ett’s Harbor. His opportunities for practice occurred at 
once, for the conditions which the arriving army en¬ 
dured were miserable. Few had tents and, since the 
terrain was wet, cold and muddy, Beaumont had am¬ 
ple experience in the treatment of rheumatism, dysen¬ 
tery, typhus, pleurisy and pneumonia. 

/“(My) treatment of the foregoing diseases I am war¬ 
ranted in adapting — from the happy issue & successful 
termination of more than two hundred cases out of 
which not one has died while under my care . . .”/ W.B., 
Nov. 1812 

He was plunged into surgery too when, at the Battle 
of York, the British exploded" several hundred barrels 
of powder in the path of advancing Americans. Sixty 
were killed instantly and 300 wounded. Beaumont 
went into action at once, together with Dr. Daniel, the 
hospital Surgeon General, and operated without let-up 
for forty-eight hours. 

/“. . . The wounds were of the worst kind — compound 
fractures of legs, thighs, & arms & fractures of skulls — 
on the night of the explosion, we were all night engaged 
in amputating & dressing the worst of them — the next 
day also and the day after I performed four amputations 
&• 3 trepanings . . .”/ W.B., April 1813 

His next engagement, for which he and his fellow sur¬ 
geon mates were cited on account of their “cool bravery” 
was at the Battle of Plattsburgh in service under General 
Alexander Macomb. 

/“. . . During the investment of Plattsburgh by the enemy 
the surgeons were constantly passing from fort to fort or 
to blockhouses to dress the wounded, exposed to a cross¬ 
fire of round and grape shot while the greater part of the 


9 


army was covered by fortifications ... I feel myself 
bound to report with much respect, the conduct of all 
medical gentlemen attached to this army . . . and who for 
their particular services . . . merit the applause of their 
country . . .”/ Surg. James Mann to Surg. James Tilton 

With the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, and the 
reduction of the standing army, Beaumont found that 
life on the base in peacetime held neither sufficient 
stimulation for his mind nor scope for his profession. 
He resigned to enter private practice, this time in Platts¬ 
burgh, where he had good friends, including a cousin, 
Dr. Samuel Beaumont, and where news of his army 
duty proficiency had preceded him. For a few years he 
shared jointly in a medical practice and in the opera¬ 
tion of a small general store selling groceries, ammuni¬ 
tion and medicines. 

Meanwhile a colleague and former military surgeon, 
Dr. Joseph Lovell, was selected to become the first Sur¬ 
geon General of the U.S. Army in Washington. Eager to 
reorganize the service and to surround himself with sim¬ 
ilarly capable men, he sought out Beaumont for a clerk¬ 
ship. The latter was tempted but turned down the offer 
of administrative work to continue in practice. On the 
other hand, Lovell’s reorganization of ratings made army 
medical service a good deal more attractive than pre¬ 
viously and Beaumont made application for readmission 
and received orders to proceed to Fort Mackinac, once 
again under General Macomb. At his own request, an ad¬ 
ditional proviso permitted him to attend the non-military 
residents of the Island since he was the only doctor in 
the area. 

/“Secretary of war has no objection to your giving your 
professional services to the sick of Mackinac, provided 
it does not interfere with your official duties. They can 
not, however, be furnished from the public chest.”/ Surg. 
Gen'l. to W.B. 

Mackinac Island, located in a commanding position on 
Lake Huron, had long been an important and colorful 
center for Indians, missionaries and fur traders. Here in 
the village settlement was the headquarters of the Amer¬ 
ican Fur Company. Here, every June and July thronged 
Indians, French-Canadians; an assortment of fishermen, 
trappers and traders bringing their goods and wares 
down rivers and streams to be sold or traded and tem¬ 
porarily swelling the island population by thousands. 
The wild parties, brawls and fights resulting from their 
short-lived accumulated winter’s earnings added con¬ 
siderably to the calls made on Dr. Beaumont's time. The 
Army surgeon continued to maintain his journal with 


assiduous attention to detail, both medical and other¬ 
wise, and so we know that life on the post and in the vil¬ 
lage was very much to his liking, but for his wistful 
references to a handsome and talented young widow 
back in Plattsburgh, Mrs. Deborah Green Platt, to whom 
he had become deeply attached while in practice there. 

/". . . oh how long doth seem our separation — anxious 
indeed am I to know our final prospects — were our 
present happy anticipations to be destroyed Er our hope¬ 
ful heart-sustaining prospects cut off — oh how cheer¬ 
less — difficult & desperate would be the future scenes 
of life . . .”/ W.B.. 1820 

In the autumn of 1821 Beaumont requested and re¬ 
ceived a brief furlough at which time he journeyed to 
Plattsburgh and shortly after returned to the island with 
Deborah as his bride. 

The voyageurs and trappers had just arrived at Fort 
Mackinac the following year, June 6th of 1822 when, in 
the milling crowd gathered in the company store, a shot 
gun was accidently discharged at close range and Alexis 
St. Martin, a young French-Canadian in the employ of 
the American Fur Company, collapsed to the floor with 
a gaping chest wound. Dr. Beaumont was summoned and 
examined the patient. 

/". . . found a portion of the lung as large as a Turkey's 
egg, protruding through the external wound, lacerated 
and burnt; and immediately below this, another protru¬ 
sion which, on further examination, proved to be a por¬ 
tion of the stomach lacerated through all its coats and 
pouring out the food he had taken for his breakfast 
through an orifice large enough to admit the fore fin¬ 
ger . . .”/ W.B. 

According to an eye witness of the shooting, after 
painstakingly removing some of the shot, fragments of 
clothing and cleansing and superficially dressing the 
wound, Beaumont departed, saying “The man can’t live 
36 hours. I will come to see him bye and bye.” Beau¬ 
mont’s own recollection, as recorded in his notebook, is 
a much more pessimistic one. 

/“. . . I considered any attempt to save his life entirely 
useless. But as I had ever considered it a duty to use 
every means in my power to preserve life when called to 
administer relief, I proceeded to cleanse the wound . . . 
not believing it possible for him to survive twenty min¬ 
utes . . .”/ W.B. 

The relationship initiated by Beaumont's life-giving 
care to young St. Martin was to transform the doctor 
from an able army surgeon and practitioner to the fore- 


10 

















most physiologist of his day whose observations, ac¬ 
cording to some, were America's first contribution to 
medicine. An interdependency would develop between 
his reluctant patient and himself which was to be a 
source of frustration and aggravation to both. 

For nearly a year Beaumont visited the fort’s frame 
hospital to minister to his patient and to dress his 
wounds daily, noting down meticulously his own treat¬ 
ments and the consequent reactions in St. Martin’s well¬ 
being, comfort and appearance. Then, officials of the 
county announced that they were neither able nor will¬ 
ing to give further support for Alexis’ upkeep; that he 
would have to be returned to his place of origin. Know¬ 
ing that the helpless youth could never survive the 1,500- 
mile trip by canoe to lower Canada, and touched by his 
miserable situation, Beaumont offered to take him into 
his own home. This could not have been an easy deci¬ 
sion for his army salary of $40.00 a month plus rations 
was already stretched to cover the support of his wife 
and year-old daughter, Sara. 

/“. . . I took him into my own family ... at a time when 
he was helpless, sick, and suffering under the debilitat¬ 
ing effects of his wounds, naked and destitute of every¬ 
thing, but pain, a ‘little breath of life' and a wounded 
body . . W.B., 1823 

There are sources who claim that from his second visit 
to St. Martin, Beaumont entertained the idea of experi¬ 
mentation on the boy by introducing food into the 
stomach via the fistula. Beaumont, whose journals are 
revealing and explicit, had this to say: 

/“. . . To retain his food and drinks I kept a compress and 
tent lint, fitted to the shape and size of the perforation 
and confined there by adhesive straps. After trying all 
the means in my power for eight or ten months to close 
the orifice, by exciting adhesive inflammation in the lips 
of the wound, without the least appearance of success, 
I gave it up as impracticable in any other way than that 
of incising and bringing them together by sutures; an 
operation to which the patient would not submit.”/ W.B. 

In the fall of the following year, the doctor sent his ob¬ 
servations to his friend and superior, Joseph Lovell, for 
approval and possible publication, and “A Case of a 
Wounded Stomach” by Joseph Lovell appeared in an 
1825 issue of The Medical Recorder. Misassignment of 
authorship was due, in all probability, to Lovell’s up¬ 
dating of St. Martin’s condition rather than to any liter¬ 
ary piracy on the part of the Surgeon General. The final 
paragraphs indicated Beaumont’s growing awareness of 
.the rare opportunity available to him to make use of his 


human laboratory for the advancement of mankind. 

/“. . . This case affords an excellent opportunity for ex¬ 
perimenting upon the gastric fluids and process of diges¬ 
tion. It would give no pain, nor cause the least uneasiness 
to extract a gill of fluid every two or three days, for it 
frequently flows out spontaneously in considerable 
quantities. Various kinds of digestible substance might 
be introduced into the stomach, and then easily exam¬ 
ined during the whole process of digestion . . ."/W.B. 

He had, as he noted in the body of the article, already 
established certain data about the functioning of gastric 
juice. Careful observer that he was, without any formal 
plan for experimentation, he had begun to question and 
to reject some of the erroneous but accepted concepts, 
replacing them with verified facts. 

An exchange of correspondence with Lovell who 
offered him encouragement and assistance fortified his 
own feelings about the importance of his investigations 
but, simultaneously, triggered his sense of isolation from 
scientific circles and heightened his awareness of the in¬ 
adequacy of his surroundings and equipment for carry¬ 
ing on experimentation. He therefore applied for, and 
eventually received a transfer to the hospital at Fort 
Niagara. The post being near Plattsburgh, Mrs. Beaumont 
and the children (now two in number) visited her fam¬ 
ily's home while the doctor embarked on the first of a 
series of digestive experiments involving St. Martin. 

The patient was then well enough to perform odd jobs 
for his patron, including wood-cutting and other house¬ 
hold chores, but with renewed health he had little taste 
for or understanding of his role as physiological guinea 
pig. A two-month furlough to Plattsburgh with the doc¬ 
tor brought Alexis close to the Canadian woods which he 
did know and understand and he bolted, leaving no word 
or trace. 

Beaumont’s despair and bitter disappointment over 
his loss was great, but having alerted the agents of the 
fur companies and their employees, his furlough over, 
the doctor was forced to return to duty at Fort Niagara. 
A second transfer carried him further west to Fort How¬ 
ard at Green Bay, another trading center. Beaumont’s 
chief concern at the post was in preventing the spread of 
smallpox, the possibility of an epidemic always threat¬ 
ening due to the nomadic lives of the Indians and traders 
of the area. 

Two years elapsed before Beaumont’s inquiries about 
his patient were to be answered: through an agent of the 
American Fur Company, Mr. William Morrison, the doc¬ 
tor was advised that Alexis, healthy but destitute, was 
living in Berthier, Lower Canada, with a wife and two 


11 


children; that if his wife could be engaged by the Beau¬ 
monts, he would gladly place himself at the doctor’s dis¬ 
posal. Two more years were to elapse before patron and 
patient were reunited. Beaumont had been transferred 
to Fort Crawford at Prairie du Chien which necessitated 
a trip of several months down various waterways for 
the voyageur and his family and a financial advance on 
the part of the doctor. 

. . He now entered my service, and I commenced an¬ 
other series of experiments on the stomach and gastric 
fluids, and continued them interruptedly until March, 
1831 . . .”/ W.B. 

In March, his wife pleading extreme homesickness, 
Alexis and his family departed for Canada — with per¬ 
mission — on his promise to return on request. It was 
Beaumont’s plan to obtain a year’s furlough and to 
travel with St. Martin to Europe to share with physiolo¬ 
gists and chemists on the continent the data he had gath¬ 
ered and to gain further insights from their studies and 
observations. Permission for both furlough and trip were 
obtained through application to Lovell. 

It was not Alexis who thwarted the doctor’s plan this 
time, but the outbreak of the Black Hawk Indian War. 
Beaumont's leave was cancelled and he and his regiment 
were directed to Fort Dearborn in Michigan. Other 
troops were being brought from the East by boat. The 
hostile Indians were soon routed with little loss of life 
through combat. However, word of a single case of 
Asiatic cholera caused mass desertions among the sol¬ 
diers who, in their flight, spread the disease throughout 
the Middle West, with loss of life from the epidemic far 
exceeding combat mortalities. Beaumont had occasion 
to treat many of the stricken and noted; 

/"The Greater proportional numbers of deaths in the 
cholera epidemics are, in my opinion, caused more by 
fright and presentiment of death than from the fatal 
tendency of violence of the disease . . .”/ W.B. 

In the summer of 1832 the doctor was again granted a 
furlough to carry out his postponed plans, but for only 
six months. He set out immediately for Plattsburgh and, 
hopefully, to reconnoiter with Alexis. And the young 
man did not disappoint him. To ensure the boy's pres¬ 
ence for a full year, however, Beaumont caused to have 
drawn up a most unusual legal document. 

/“. . . the said Alexis shall . . . serve, abide and continue 
with the said William Beaumont, wherever he shall go or 
travel or reside in any part of the world and according to 
the utmost of his power, skill and knowledge, exercise 


and employ himself in and do and perform such service 
and business matters and things ... as the said William 
shall ... or do, direct and appoint . . .”/ 

In return, the doctor was to provide his “servant” with 
food, clothing, lodging and $150.00. The document (now 
in the library of Washington University Medical School 
in St. Louis) bears the signature of Beaumont and the X 
of St. Martin. 

Many reasons are postulated for Dr. Beaumont's 
travelling to Washington, D.C. rather than to Europe 
(though his briefer furlough would seem to be explana¬ 
tion enough) and Washington seems to have been a most 
productive alternative. There were countless books and 
eminent minds for him to consult. And Lovell, as usual, 
rendered him every assistance including making Alexis 
a sergeant in the Army with a small stipend, clothing 
allowance and subsistence. This enlistment was a source 
of financial relief since Alexis was gradually becoming 
aware of his unique value to science and had continually 
increased his demands on his patron. 

While conducting his third series of experiments, Beau¬ 
mont was able to consult with Robley Dunglison, profes¬ 
sor of physiology and chairman of the medical depart¬ 
ment at the University of Virginia, via an extensive cor¬ 
respondence and in person, when the professor visited 
Washington for the express purpose of meeting Beau¬ 
mont and exchanging their respective speculations and 
observations on the chemical composition of the gastric 
fluids, and possible areas for further experimentation. 
Here were carried out the third series of observations 
and conclusions involving the solvent action of gastric 
juice, the importance of chewing action in spite of sol¬ 
vents and the relation of temperature to digestion. 

A highly profitable six months elapsed. Once again 
Lovell offered assistance by assigning him to New York 
to examine recruits, a task which would leave him suffi¬ 
cient freedom to continue his experiments and to gather 
his conclusions into a form for publication. Before leav¬ 
ing Washington, he left Dunglison a vial of gastric fluid 
for his further analysis and the promise that he would 
continue to exchange pertinent findings. 

Eager to gather all possible information on the chem¬ 
ical changes he had observed for inclusion in his book, 
Beaumont made a trip to New Haven where he was 
warmly received at the hands of Benjamin Silliman, then 
professor of chemistry and natural history. Silliman not 
only agreed to undertake an analysis of the fluid but also 
to enlist the interest and talents of Professor Jacob 
Berzelius of Stockholm in making similar tests. 

/“. . . My motive for troubling you with this affair is that 


12 















I am anxious that a subject of such deep interest to man¬ 
kind should be investigated by (pardon me for saying) 
the man of all others best qualified for the task . . ."/Silli- 
man to Berzelius, 1833. 

Concerning his progress in New York, however, Beau¬ 
mont was less than content and wrote Lovell: 

* /“. . . My official duties are very light and would not in- 
terefere at all with my experiments, could I avoid the 
vexatious official intercourse to which 1 am perpetually 
exposed in this City. It is an unfavorable place for the 
pursuit of physiological inquiries and experiments.”/ 

' W.B., 1833 

The Surgeon General, convinced of the value to man¬ 
kind and to medicine of publishing Beaumont’s work, 
once again transferred the doctor, this time to Platts¬ 
burgh where, though his title was recruiting officer, he 
[ would have time to compile his results and put them in 
form for publication. This he did with the assistance of 
his cousin, Samuel Beaumont, who was not only a prac¬ 
ticing physician but also conversant with details of 
publishing. The post in Plattsburgh also made possible a 
reunion with his family. 

Alexis, on learning of the death of one of his children, 
left for a brief trip to Canada once more. There was little 
doubt of his return since he was still subject to army 
discipline. And Beaumont would have little need for his 
services as he was deeply immersed in the collating of 
material and the minutiae attendant to publication. 

During the summer the manuscript of Observations 
and Experiments on the Gastric Juice and the Physiology 
of Digestion was virtually completed, to be sold by sub¬ 
scription. Notices including the table of contents and a 
description of the book (bound in pasteboard, three en¬ 
gravings and price: $3.00) were issued, but Beaumont de¬ 
layed publication, ever hopeful that one of the two emi¬ 
nent chemists he had consulted would be able to isolate 
the solvent in gastric fluid which still escaped identifica¬ 
tion. He received lengthy and encouraging communica¬ 
tions from Silliman, though the professor had been 
forced to delay experimentation owing to departmental 
demands and, indeed, provided disappointingly little 
new information, only confirming certain earlier state¬ 
ments about the presence of free hydrochloric acid when 
he did complete his analysis of the fluid. From Berzelius, 
there was no word. Beaumont continued from July until 
November with his fourth series of experiments with 
Alexis who had returned promptly. 

Though no further information could be included in 
the book, Beaumont continued to be persistent in his 


quest and, hoping to avoid future interruption, executed 
a new two-year contract with St. Martin at a greatly ad¬ 
vanced figure. The two devoted a brief period to appear¬ 
ances before medical societies and departments in the 
Northwest and then Beaumont released his partner once 
again for another short furlough. 

When the book was published, it received wide and 
complimentary notices but the sales were disappointing. 
The doctor repaired to Washington once more, this time 
to appeal to Congress for an appropriation to cover the 
ever-growing expenses incurred in the support of Alexis 
and in the advancement of science. In spite of expert 
testimony in his behalf on the part of both political and 
medical lobbyists, the bill, involving about $4,000, was 
turned down by a vote of 129 to 56. 

Disappointment piled op disappointment for, on Beau¬ 
mont’s return to Plattsburgh, Alexis had not returned or 
sent any word of his plans. Meanwhile, the harrassed 
doctor had received orders to proceed to Jefferson Bar¬ 
racks, Missouri. 

Once at his post, he tried through every available 
channel to get Alexis to rejoin him. Letters passed be¬ 
tween the two, with the Canadian citing illness, the 
frozen and impassable waterways, the fact that he had 
just cultivated his garden, among his many excuses for 
remaining in Berthier. Beaumont appealed again to Mor¬ 
rison of the fur company: 

/". . . / am desirous of ascertaining Alexis’ situation and 
true disposition, and can only expect to succeed indirect¬ 
ly through your kindness and candor. Long, vexatious 
experience has too much impaired my confidence in him 
to rely upon his assertions and promises . . . I advanced 
him money, considerably more than was then due him 
. . . since which I have not seen or reed, anything from 
him but mere pretexts for his failure to return according 
to agreement. . .”/ 

A transfer to the arsenal at St. Louis was the doctor’s 
final and permanent assignment. Reunited with his fam¬ 
ily, Beaumont settled in the city of St. Louis. Part of his 
time was occupied by his duties as attendant physician 
to the officers and their families stationed at the arsen¬ 
al. As before, Surgeon General Lovell agreed to his pur¬ 
suing a practice within the city and its suburbs, the 
practice no doubt enhanced by the reception accorded 
his book and the word of his experiments on the still- 
absent Alexis. 

/". . . I have a very handsome, lucrative and respectable 
private practice ... a reputation far above my deserts 
and a professional popularity more than commensurate 


13 


with my best practical skill or abilities . . .”/ W.B., 1834 

Letters from Alexis and other interested parties and 
stories of the man’s whereabouts continued to filter into 
the surgeon’s St. Louis office. There were reports that he 
was prepared to return to the doctor's service if he could 
bring his wife and if the doctor would advance him some 
money. Other reports told of his addiction to drink (“an 
abandoned drunkard’’ wrote one) and of the family’s 
utter destitution. Friends warned Beaumont that St. Mar¬ 
tin would squander any sums advanced him for travel, 
but the frustrated man never ceased in his efforts. As 
late as 1852 — six months before the doctor’s death — 
a final appeal went out to the wily Canadian. 

/“. . . Without reference to past efforts and disappoint¬ 
ments ... I now proffer to you in faith and sincerity, 
new, and I hope satisfactory, terms and conditions to en¬ 
sure your prompt and faithful compliance with my most 
fervent desire to have you again with me . . . you know 
what I have done for you many years since . . . what ef¬ 
forts, anxieties, anticipations and disappointments I 
have suffered from your non-fulfilment of my expecta¬ 
tions. Don't disappoint me more . . .”/ W.B. 

The two never met again. 

Beaumont’s practice and his reputation in St. Louis 
continued to increase. In 1835 when St. Louis University 
decided to establish a medical school, the doctor was ap¬ 
proached to take the chair in surgery. Still attached to 
the Army, he accepted only provisionally, pending de¬ 
partmental consent. Unfortunately for Beaumont, his 
friend Lovell died in 1836 and was replaced by Thomas 
Lawson. Lawson, who was, in other respects, a fine sur¬ 
geon general, seems to have been piqued by the many 
privileges accorded Beaumont by Lovell and it was ru¬ 
mored he planned to send the doctor to Jefferson Bar¬ 
racks. Through the intercession of friends, in military 
and political circles, this move was delayed and then 
dropped, but Lawson did, in fact, order his removal to 
Fort Brooks in Florida. The doctor reflected on his many 
years of service, his advanced age and the very happy 
life he had established for his family and himself in St. 
Louis and tendered his resignation unless the order to 
Florida were rescinded. After 25 years of devoted asso¬ 
ciation, he was both indignant and deeply hurt by the 
peremptory acceptance of his separation, as were others: 

/“. . . The policy of the department has driven the best 
surgeon out of the army without the slightest occasion. I 
am sorry to lose you from the same profession in which 
I serve for the double reason of personal friendship and 
professional pride ... a better physician or better man is 


not found in any country . . .”/ Major Ethan Allan Hitch¬ 
cock to W.B., 1839 

Beaumont was now free to accept the University’s of¬ 
fer, but the plans were slow in materializing and there 
is no record of his having actually lectured there, though 
a building opened in 1842 and there is evidence that he 
had planned to give a lecture course in digestion in 1851 
using St. Martin as his laboratory exhibit. 

Until his death, St. Louis was his home and practice 
was his life. And a lucrative practice it was, permitting 
Beaumont to buy a large tract of land in the country. In 
1849 when a cholera epidemic broke out in St. Louis, he 
was on constant call, day and night, because of his pre¬ 
vious experience with the dread disease and because of 
his reputation for serving humanity — rich and poor 
alike. 

He was returning from a house call one cold winter 
night in March of 1856 when he slipped on some icy 
stairs, suffering a fall and a resulting infection which 
caused his death the following month. Because of his 
tenacity in the pursuit of a cause which interested him, 
Beaumont had his champions and his detractors. One 
memorial endorsement was made by physiologist Victor 
C. Vaughan: “Every physician who prescribes for diges¬ 
tive disorders and every patient who is benefitted by 
such prescription owes gratitude to the memory of Wil¬ 
liam Beaumont for the benefit of mankind.’’ Beaumont 
virtually wrote his own epitaph in a sentence much- 
quoted from his book on observations when he said: 
“Truth like beauty when ‘unadorned is adorned the 
most’; and in prosecuting these experiments and inqui¬ 
ries, I believe I have been guided by its light." 

* * * 

Alexis St. Martin, the youth given up for dead in 1822, 
lived to age 83, sired 17 children and died in Canada in 
1880 — 24 years after the death of the doctor. Many in¬ 
terested medical figures, including Sir William Osier, re¬ 
quested the opportunity of making an autopsy. Osier 
even made a sizable financial offer to the family through 
their parish priest in an effort to obtain the stomach 
which he planned to give to the Army Medical Museum 
in Washington but he, with the others, was turned down. 
St. Martin’s widow, to thwart the possibility of any in¬ 
terference, hid the body in the house for several days 
until it was quite decomposed and then ordered her hus¬ 
band’s grave dug eight feet deep as insurance against 
future disinterment. 


14 









Physiologist and Obstetrician 

S tillborn?” 

“ 'Fraid so.” 

Green gowns bent over the draped table. Eyes moved 
in the bands of face between caps and masks. Gloved 
hands grasped the emerging head and shoulders. 

“Let’s get it out and suture the mother. No need to 
endanger her. She’s a good sheep.” 

The lamb was being delivered by cesarean section, a 
necessary procedure in Dr. Quilligan’s current research 
on fetal physiology during labor. These studies involve 
the correlation of fetal heart rate patterns with acid- 
base status and cerebral metabolism in the newborn. 

Dr. Quilligan pulled the small animal's hindquarters 
through the incision in the maternal abdomen and 
rubbed the limp, wet form for a moment with his hands. 
‘‘Too bad.” He lifted it to a side table and was about to 
release it. “Wait a minute—it’s alive! Pretty depressed, 
but not quite zero.” Other hands reached toward the 
lamb, forcing suction tubes into the nose and mouth 
and rubbing the chest and limbs. Within minutes the 
newborn animal raised its head and emitted a healthy- 
sounding bleat. 

A few days earlier, in a surgical procedure, the un¬ 
born lamb had been partly removed from the mother’s 
uterus. Two small electrocardiogram electrodes had 
been implanted in the fetal axilla, catheters placed in 
the aorta and jugular vein, a flow probe put around the 
carotid artery, and an electroencephalogram electrode 
attached to the brain. The lamb was then replaced in 
the uterus to be delivered 72 hours later. 

This animal’s contribution to Dr. Quilligan’s research 
program is to help elucidate the physiologic changes 
underlying alterations in fetal heart rate, fetal EEG, and 
the biochemistry of the fetus during labor. New meth¬ 
ods for monitoring these activities in the human fetus 
have been under development at Yale by Dr. Edward 
H. Hon since the early 1950’s and are now in clinical 
use at the Yale-New Haven Medical Center in maternity 
cases where fetal distress is anticipated. 

It was in 1957 that Dr. Quilligan first visited Yale to 
consult with Dr. Hon on monitoring instrumentation, 
which he then applied in his studies at Western Reserve 
on gas metabolism in the human fetus. His present com¬ 
prehensive research on fetal physiology during labor 
employs sheep only and is one of the most advanced 
and exciting programs in this field being conducted 
anywhere in the world. 

Edward James Quilligan, who became chairman of 
Yale’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology two 
years ago, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, June 18, 1925. 
Although there had been no doctors in his family, he 


Faculty Profile: Edward James Quilligan, M.D., 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 



knew from the time he could talk that he wanted to 
become a physician. His father, a developer and sales¬ 
man of baby formulas and later president of the Simi- 
lac Company, was always connected with the medical 
profession through his interest in feeding babies. 

Growing up in Columbus, the second of three boys, 
young Ted Quilligan found that science and mathe¬ 
matics came easily to him at school, but his interests 
were not particularly scientific. “I was mainly inter¬ 
ested in athletics,” he recalls. “I also played around 
with things like photography and woodworking. You 
name it and I probably did it. I’d say I was the kind of 
child who dabbled in lots of things and didn’t perfect 
anything.” 

His enthusiasm for athletics, however, led him to 
master most of the popular sports, and his ability as a 
swimmer once served him especially well in a crisis: 
“It was at summer camp when I was about 14. One 
evening a group of us decided to go out to an island in 
the river which could be reached by a bridge a quarter 


15 


a E 





of a mile upstream. We sat around telling ghost stories 
and we told them so well we scared ourselves. So in¬ 
stead of going back to camp the long way on foot, we 
decided to swim the river. About half way across one 
of the kids remembered that he didn’t know how to 
swim and he started to drown. I decided I could get 
him to the shore, but it was a close call. He grabbed 
me around the neck and pulled me down twice before 
I finally got a hold on him and pulled him in." 

Schooling , Army, and a Blind Date 

His schooling included two years at a military acad¬ 
emy. During the summers he worked as a copy boy for 
a newspaper, a camp counselor, and a laboratory at¬ 
tendant at Ohio State University in Columbus, which 
was to be his alma mater. In his senior year at Western 
Military Academy, he was accepted at Dartmouth Col¬ 
lege, his first choice for the pre-medical years. That 
spring, however, it became apparent that he would be 
drafted if he waited to start classes at Dartmouth in 
September. 

The military school permitted him to graduate ahead 
of schedule so that he could enter Ohio State in the 
spring quarter of 1943. Under the wartime acceleration 
system, he was able to pass certain examinations and 
receive credit for courses without taking them. By mid¬ 
summer he had accumulated enough credits to apply 
for Ohio State University College of Medicine where 
he was accepted for entrance in the fall of 1944. But 


Above: An unborn lamb is 
irtly removed from the 
other’s uterus and equipped 
for fetal monitoring. 


Right: After electrodes and 
catheters are implanted in the 
fetal lamb, the animal is re¬ 
placed in the uterus. 



16 





having nearly achieved the threshold of his career— 
and the draft exemption that would go with it—he de¬ 
cided to defer the whole plan and join the Army. 

He took basic training at Little Rock and was com¬ 
missioned a second lieutenant in the Infantry at Fort 
Benning, Georgia. For the next two years he served 
with a quartermaster battalion in Germany and returned 
in 1946 to pick up where he had left off at Columbus. 
That December he married Betty Jean Cleaton, a stu¬ 
dent at Ohio State, whom he had met on a blind date 
that he almost failed to keep. It was just after he re¬ 
ceived his commission when he was home on leave 
before going to Germany. 

“I went swimming,” he explains, ‘‘and met a friend at 
the pool who offered to fix me up with a blind date 
and we'd all go dancing. Since most of the girls I knew 
at college were away for the summer I said okay. Later 
my friend called me at home, told me my date's name, 
and said I was to pick her up at eight at the Delta 
Gamma house. Then another friend called and wanted 
me to have a beer with him for old times’ sake, which 
of course I did. 

‘‘Well, we had two or three beers at a place called 
Larry’s and I completely forgot my date’s name. But I 
remembered where she lived. Time slipped by faster 
than I thought and 1 got to the Delta Gamma house an 
hour late. I knocked and a perfectly lovely girl opened 
the door. I thought this can’t possibly be my blind date, 
so I'll just tell her my plight, and I said ‘I'm Ted Quilli- 
gan and there’s a girl here with whom I’m supposed to 
have a blind date, but I can’t for the life of me remem¬ 
ber her name.’ 

“Then the lovely girl said, ‘I’m your blind date,’ and 
with that I just about crawled right out under the door. 
But she went out with me anyway, and that was the be¬ 
ginning of our life together.” 

At medical school he found that his main interests 
at first were anatomy and physiology. ‘‘In addition to 
wanting to be a doctor, I had always said I wanted to 
be a surgeon, and that seemed to be my direction at the 
beginning. There was only one time when I wasn’t sure 
I wanted to be a physician and that was toward the end 
of my second year when we began to go into the hos¬ 
pital for the first time. 

‘‘I don’t know whether it was something in the hos¬ 
pital atmosphere, the odor, or my being tense at the 
thought of seeing patients—but I had tremendous nau¬ 
sea associated with the hospital. I thought 1 certainly 
can’t go through this for the rest of my life, and Betty 
and I talked seriously about my junking the whole busi¬ 
ness and going into engineering, which had always 


been my second choice of a career. Fortunately, the 
nausea reaction wore off completely in four or five 
months and there was never any doubt again about 
my wanting to be in medicine. 

In the summer between his second and third years of 
medical school, he took an externship in a private hos¬ 
pital where he was in charge of the emergency room. 
During his third and fourth years he served as a junior 
instructor in anatomy at the medical school and held 
down a night job as an extern in a children’s hospital. 
He received his M.D. degree in 1951 and began a rotat¬ 
ing internship at Ohio State University Hospital. 

Career Decisions 

“At that time I still hadn’t given up the idea of sur¬ 
gery," he says, “but I had found obstetrics and gyne¬ 
cology one of my most enjoyable clerkships in medical 
school. Our rotating internship put us through those 
two specialties as well as internal medicine and pedi¬ 
atrics. I knew I didn't want to be a pediatrician, but my 
first rotation, which was internal medicine, was so in¬ 
teresting that I thought I would be an internist. On my 
second rotation, obstetrics and gynecology, I decided 
that this was really my held after all. Then I went to 
surgery and thoroughly enjoyed that too. It was a di¬ 
lemma, and I put in applications for residencies in all 
three. 

“Dr. Charles Hendricks, who was then assistant pro¬ 
fessor of obstetrics and gynecology, sat down with me 
one day and asked me what I really wanted to do. He 
said that if I was sure I wanted obstetrics and gyne¬ 
cology they would offer me a residency. Then I realized 
that this would give me a combination of everything I 
wanted. I would have the opportunity to practice good 
medicine and good surgery within the framework of a 
specialty I particularly liked. So I accepted.” 

Before he began his residency, Dr. Quilligan had not 
seriously considered a career in academic medicine. He 
and a close friend with whom he had gone through 
medical school and internship were planning to go into 
practice together. In consultation with each other, they 
agreed to give academic medicine a try—and it took 
with both. The close friend, Dr. Frederick Zuspan, is 
now chairman of the department of obstetrics and gyn¬ 
ecology at the University of Chicago. 

The teachers who influenced him most, Dr. Quilligan 
feels, were Dr. Allen Barnes, chairman of the depart¬ 
ment at Ohio State, and Dr. Hendricks, with whom he 
began his research at Columbus. In 1953, Dr. Barnes 
moved to the department chairmanship at Western Re¬ 
serve University School of Medicine, and the following 


17 




year he invited Dr. Hendricks and a group of residents, 
including Drs. Quilligan and Zuspan, to join him. 

Dr. Quilligan’s initial research dealt with cardiac out¬ 
put in pregnancy. Those studies, conducted in collab¬ 
oration with Dr. Hendricks, led to an investigation of 
cardiac output during labor and other aspects of the 
maternal hemodynamics involved in giving birth. For 
their contributions in this field, Drs. Hendricks and 
Quilligan received the Central Obstetrics and Gynecol¬ 
ogy Society Prize in 1954. 

Collaborative research followed on intrauterine pres¬ 
sure, intervillous space pressure, and other aspects of 
maternal physiology, and at the completion of his resi¬ 
dency in 1956, Dr. Quilligan branched out to begin ex¬ 
ploring the physiology of the fetus. Appointed to the 
medical faculty at Western Reserve, he continued his 
studies there and at Cleveland Metropolitan General 
Hospital. In 1963 he attained the rank of professor and 
was named chairman and director of the department of 
obstetrics and gynecology at the hospital. 

During his last year in Cleveland he began his pres¬ 
ent extensive program of research with fetal sheep, a 
program he further developed in California where he 
accepted a professorship at the University of Califor¬ 


nia School of Medicine in Los Angeles in 1965. At the | 
same time he was made chief of obstetrics and gyne- I 
cology at Harbor General Hospital in Torrance. 

In 1966 Yale was seeking a successor to Dr. C. Lee 
Buxton, chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. Dr. Buxton, who was then on leave of 
absence because of illness, had headed the department 
for twelve years and had won international acclaim for 
his work in advancing the cause of planned parent¬ 
hood. He and his senior colleagues in the department, 
Drs. C. D. Davis and John McL. Morris, were unanimous 
in their recommendation of Dr. Quilligan for the post. 
For Dr. Quilligan, it was a return to the site of his early 
interest in fetal physiology and an opportunity to pur¬ 
sue his basic research in closer liaison with the pio¬ 
neering applications being made by Dr. Hon in his fetal 
intensive care program. 

A Family Man 

Although he frequently works ten to twelve hours a 
day, Dr. Quilligan is very much a family man. He and 
his wife live in Woodbridge where their house is al¬ 
ways a center of action, with five of their six children 
living at home. The eldest, Bruce, born during his 


Dr Nathan G. Kase, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, discusses a patient's problem with his colleagues. 



18 





Cyclists Chris, Teddy, and Linda Quilligan and their parents consider the 
hitchhiker in Linda's basket. He's the family poodle, John. 


father’s first year of medical school, is a junior now at 
Ohio Wesleyan University where he is majoring in 
economics. Jay, a senior in high school, is interested in 
falconry and has had a variety of hawks and owls liv¬ 
ing with the family, including a handsome Red-tailed 


Hawk named Elmer who last year flew free around the 
neighborhood in Woodbridge and returned nightly to 
the Quilligan house where he had learned to knock on 
the door. Daughter Carol, at 15, is a talented flutist and 
enthusiastic skier. 

Sports still figure importantly in Dr. Quilligan’s life 
and he keeps a keen edge on his skills at tennis and 
golf. He loves to sail and for several summers the fam¬ 
ily vacationed at Glen Lake, Michigan, where he kept 
a 16-foot sailboat. This past summer the three younger 
Quilligans—Christopher, 13, Linda, 10, and Teddy, 9— 
accompanied their parents on a sailing and swimming 
holiday on Cape Cod. Betty Quilligan fully shares her 
husband's enjoyment of the outdoors: their vacations 
have included winter skiing at Aspen and in the Lau- 
rentians and water skiing in Florida. Some day they 
will travel abroad, he says, “when all the children are 
through college.” 

For the immediate future he sees an enormous job to 
be done in his held of medicine. In an article beginning 
on page 3 of this issue, he discusses some of the chal¬ 
lenges the obstetrician-gynecologist must help to meet 
in the coming decades, challenges inherent in the popu¬ 
lation explosion and the sexual revolution. In planning 


Dr. Quilligan meets every morning with department faculty members and residents for review and study of clinical cases. 



19 




the program of his department at Yale, he is deeply 
aware that patient care, research, and teaching must re¬ 
spond to these phenomena with new ideas and ap¬ 
proaches. 

Last year the department established a special re¬ 
search section directed toward the study and control 
of human reproduction. Efforts in this area include the 
research in fertility and early reproductive physiology 
being conducted by Dr. Morris and studies in infertility 
and steroid metabolism by Dr. Buxton and Dr. Nathan 
G. Kase. Other research in the department supports the 
right of every child that is born to be well born. In ad¬ 
dition to the investigations of Drs. Hon and Quilligan 
in fetal brain damage, important studies in erythroblas¬ 
tosis by Dr. Maclyn E. Wade, Dr. Davis, and Dr. Ernest 
I. Kohorn are in progress. 

The one major problem of the department at present 
is logistic. The research and teaching programs have 
expanded to the limit of available facilities. “We des¬ 
perately need more staff, but we have no place to put 
them,’’ Dr. Quilligan says and glances longingly at an 
architect's sketch of the $7 million tower that is to be 
constructed at the corner of Congress and Howard 
Avenues. The proposed building, to be called the Lab¬ 
oratory of Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, was 
announced a year ago but funds for its construction are 
not yet available. 

In addition to providing much needed laboratory and 
office space, the new building will house the depart¬ 
ment’s famous primate colony. Dr. Gertrude van Wage- 
nen is responsible for developing this outstanding 
colony of Macacos rhesus monkeys which are vital to 
the research program in reproductive physiology. 


During his two years in New Haven, Dr. Quilligan I 
has had a significant impact on medical education at 
Yale: he is acknowledged by his students to be an ex¬ 
cellent teacher, and he has also served on the curricu¬ 
lum committee where he was one of the group that i 
pushed for extensive revisions in the four-year program j 
leading to the M.D. degree. The new curriculum, which 
takes effect with this fall’s entering class, reflects many I 
of the viewpoints that Dr. Quilligan brought to the com¬ 
mittee’s deliberations, including his belief in the impor¬ 
tance of early clinical experience. It is apparent that 
the chairman of obstetrics and gynecology will con¬ 
tinue to exert a valuable influence in the charting of 
new directions for Yale medicine in the years ahead. 


Architect's model of the proposed budding 
for the departments of surgery and 
obstetrics and gynecology. 





In and About Sterling Hall 


Dr. Gerhard Giebisch Named 
Chairman of Physiology 



Dr. Gerhard Giebisch, an authority 
on kidney physiology, has been ap¬ 
pointed professor and chairman of 
the Department of Physiology. He 
was formerly professor of physi¬ 
ology at Cornell University Medical 
College. 

Dr. Giebisch was born in Vienna, 
Austria, and received his medical 
degree from the University of Vien¬ 
na. He remained there after gradua¬ 
tion to do research on renal tubular 
function by micropuncture and mi¬ 
cro-analytical techniques. 

His research on renal regulation 
of electrolyte metabolism has re¬ 
ceived international recognition and 
he has made extensive contribu¬ 
tions to knowledge of the electrical 
properties of the tubule and factors 
influencing electrolyte transport 
across biological membranes. 

Dr. Giebisch interned at Milwau¬ 
kee Hospital in 1952 and held a 
fellowship in physiology at Cornell 
Medical College in 1953 and 1954. 
He was appointed to the Cornell 
medical faculty in 1955. 

An American citizen since 1962, 
Dr. Giebisch became a recipient 
that year of a Public Health Service 
Research Career Award. Since 1964 
he has been a member of the physi¬ 
ology study section of the National 
Institutes of Health. He is also sec¬ 
tion editor for kidney and electro¬ 
lyte metabolism of The American 
Journal of Physiology and The Amer¬ 


ican Journal of Applied Physiology. 
He is a member of several profes¬ 
sional societies including the Amer¬ 
ican Physiological Society, the Bio¬ 
physical Society, and the American 
Society of Nephrology. 

Dr. Ostfeld Appointed Chairman 
of Epidemiology and Public Health 



Dr. Adrian M. Ostfeld, former head 
of preventive medicine and com¬ 
munity health at the University of 
Illinois College of Medicine, has 
been appointed chairman of the De¬ 
partment of Epidemiology and Pub¬ 
lic Health. He has also assumed the 
Anna M. R. Lauder professorship 
of epidemiology and public health. 

Dr. Ostfeld has done considerable 
research on sociological and psy¬ 
chological factors in coronary heart 
disease and stroke. He is an advo¬ 
cate of university participation in 
community health programs and, in 
his former position in Chicago, took 
an active role in planning for the 
delivery of health care and other 
services in an impoverished neigh¬ 
borhood of that city. 

A native of St. Louis, Dr. Ostfeld 
received a B.A. degree in 1947 and 
the M.D. degree cum laude in 1951, 
both from Washington University 
in St. Louis. 

After serving his internship and 
residency at Barnes Hospital in St. 
Louis, Dr. Ostfeld was a Common¬ 
wealth Fellow in medicine at New 
York Hospital. His first academic 
appointment was in 1955 as instruc¬ 


tor in medicine at Cornell Medical 
College. The following year he was 
appointed assistant professor of 
medicine at the University of Illi¬ 
nois and attending physician at the 
University’s Research and Educa¬ 
tional Hospitals. 

He was promoted to associate pro¬ 
fessor of preventive medicine in 
1960 and to professor in 1963. In 
1966 he was named head of the de¬ 
partment. 

Faculty Notes 

Dr. Allan V. N. Goodyer, professor 
of medicine, was installed as presi¬ 
dent of the Connecticut Heart As¬ 
sociation in July. He has been chief 
of the Cardiac Section of the De¬ 
partment of Medicine at Yale since 
1956 and was president of the New 
Haven Heart Association from 1964 
to 1966. 

In recognition of his contribution 
in the field of angiology and for his 
monograph, Removal of Cholesterol 
and Other Lipids from Experimental 
Animal and Human Atheromatous 
Arteries by Dilute Hydrogen Perox¬ 
ide, Dr. John T. Mallams, professor 
of clinical radiology, has received 
the Honor Achievement Award of 
the Angiology Research Foundation. 
Dr. Mallams, who came to Yale 
from the Baylor University Medical 
Center in Dallas as a visiting profes¬ 
sor in July 1967, received his pres¬ 
ent appointment in January. 

Dr. William W. L. Glenn, profes¬ 
sor of surgery, has been named to 
a 15-member Committee on Ethics 
by the American Heart Association. 
The Committee, which will study 
the many ethical, moral, and legal 
problems which may arise as a re¬ 
sult of heart transplantations and 
other areas of experimental surgery, 
includes leaders in the fields of 
medicine, law, religion, education 
and communications. 

Dr. Clarence D. Davis, professor 
of obstetrics and gynecology, ad¬ 
dressed a group of obstetricians and 
gynecologists from English medical 
centers at the University of London 


21 



in the spring. His subject was eryth¬ 
roblastosis fetalis. 

Dr. Alfred S. Evans, professor of 
epidemiology, was elected secretary- 
treasurer of the American Epidemi¬ 
ological Society at its annual meet¬ 
ing in Washington this spring. 

Dr. Sidney Blatt, associate profes¬ 
sor of psychology, presented “An 
Evaluation of Some Methodological 
Issues in Research with Projective 
Techniques’’ at the Seventh Inter¬ 
national Congress of Projective 
Techniques held in London in Aug¬ 
ust. 

Dr. Blatt and former colleagues, 
Drs. Carl Zimet and Joel Allison, 
collaborated on The Interpretation 
of Psychological Tests (Harper & 
Row) published this spring. Their 
book discusses basic assumptions 
and principles of clinical psycho¬ 
logical testing and demonstrates the 
process of test interpretation and re¬ 
porting. There is an intensive dis¬ 
cussion of test administration and 
rationales which precedes clinical 
examples of interpretation. 

Dr. Seymour L. Lustman, profes¬ 
sor of psychiatry, has been ap¬ 
pointed to the editorial board of 
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 
initially published 23 years ago by 
Dr. Anna Freud, Heinz Hartmann, 
Ernst Kris and Ruth Eissler. Articles 
embrace issues of normal and patho¬ 
logical development in the treatment 
of the child towards his maximal 
development. The concerns of the 
editors are scientific with special 
emphasis on the relationship be¬ 
tween general theory building and 
techniques in actual practice. 

Dr. Roy Schafer, clinical profes¬ 
sor of psychology, whose Projective 
Testing and Psychoanalysis (Inter¬ 
national Universities Press) ap¬ 
peared in 1967, has a new volume, 
Aspects of Internalization, published 
by the same press. Dr. Schafer is well 
known for his publication of the 
psychoanalytic interpretation of 
psychological test results and has 
contributed directly to the psycho¬ 
analytic literature on such topics as 
empathy, affects, the superego, and 


the ego ideal. His newest work ex¬ 
presses his deepening interest in 
psychoanalytic ego psychology. 

Dr. Albert J. Solnit, professor of 
pediatrics and psychiatry, was in¬ 
vited to Oslo, Sweden, this summer 
to lecture to practicing pediatricians 
and the staff of Barnepsykiatrisk In- 
stitutt. Dr. Solnit spoke on “Child 
Analysis and Pediatrics: Collabora¬ 
tive Interests.” 

Commencement 1968 

At the 267th Yale commencement 
exercises in June, 81 candidates re¬ 
ceived the Doctor of Medicine de¬ 
gree and 41 received the degree of 
Master of Public Health. 

The M.D. degree cum laude, con¬ 
ferred on students whose work 
shows unusual merit, was awarded 
to Joseph Francis Andrews, Jr., 
Daniel Ira Becker, Rutledge Withers 


Currie, Mark Gilbert Grand, Frank 
Edward Lucente, Richard Pence 
Mills, Bruce Stuart Schoenberg, and 
Elizabeth Meehan Short. 

The following prizes and awards 
were conferred on members of the 
graduating, class: 

The Borden Undergraduate Re¬ 
search Award in Medicine to a grad¬ 
uating student whose research has 
been determined by the School of 
Medicine to be the most meritorious 
performed by all similarly eligible 
persons, originality and thorough¬ 
ness of research to be of primary 
consideration: Alan George Fine- 
silver. 

The Campbell Prize for the high¬ 
est rank in the examinations of the 
course: Daniel Ira Becker. 

The Miriam Kathleen Das ey 
Award to that student who by 
strength of character, personal in- 


The graduation procession of the Yale School of Medicine moves through the Noah Porter Gateway 
from Cross Campus. Heading the procession is Class Marshal Mark Grand. Immediately behind him 
are (left to right) Dean Redlich, Dr. Lippard, and Dean Forbes. 



22 








tegrity, and academic achievement 
gives promise of fulfilling the ideal 
of the compassionate physician: 
Elizabeth Meehan Short. 

The Keese Prize to the student 
who presents the best thesis: Alfred 
Quinn Scheuer. 

The Parker Prize to the student 
who has shown the best qualifica¬ 
tions for a successful practitioner: 
Mark Gilbert Grand. 

The Perkins Scholarship Prize to 
the student making the best record 
in scholarship in the basic subjects 
of the medical and biological sci¬ 
ences: David Allyn Geer. 

Other awards to graduates in¬ 
cluded: 

The John F. Fulton Award — 
Bruce Stuart Schoenberg received 
the John F. Fulton Award in the 
History of Medicine for his essay, 
J. J. Woodward and his Studies on 
the Minute Anatomy of Cancerous 
Tumors, 1873. 

The Fulton Award was estab¬ 
lished in memory of the late physi¬ 
ologist, medical historian and bibli¬ 
ophile, long a distinguished member 
of the faculty of the School of Med¬ 
icine. The award is given annually 
to the student who submits the best 
manuscript of a talk presented at a 
meeting of the Nathan Smith Club 
during the academic year. 

The Alfred A. Richman Essay 
Contest, sponsored by the American 
College of Chest Physicians for se¬ 
nior medical students throughout 
the world: Peter Jokl, 2nd prize. 

Prizes to students other than 
those in the graduating class in¬ 
cluded: 

The Ramsey Memorial Scholar¬ 
ship Prize to a student of unques¬ 
tioned ability and character after 
completing his first year in clinical 
medicine: Timothy Pedley, Gary 
Farnham, and Robert Marier. 

The M. C. Winternitz Prize in 
Pathology to the second-year stu¬ 
dent who, in the opinion of the De¬ 
partment of Pathology, has done 
outstanding work in the course: 
Anne McBride Curtis and Kenneth 
Alan Khoury. 


Professors Emeriti 

On June 30, Dr. William J. German, 
professor of neurosurgery, and Dr. 
Isidore S. Falk, professor of public 
health, were appointed to the rank 
of professor emeritus. 

Dr. German who has been con¬ 
nected with the school for nearly 
40 years, is widely known for his 
research and publications on brain 
tumors and surgery of the nervous 
system. 

Dr. Falk was appointed professor 
of public health at Yale in 1961. He 
has made major contributions to the 
development of group health center 
organization, health insurance, and 
teaching and research in medical 
care. 

Symposium Honors Professor Falk 

“Medical Care: The Current Scene 
and Prospects for the Future” was 
the title of a two-day symposium 
held in May to honor Dr. Isidore S. 
Falk who retired as professor of 
public health. Sponsored by the De¬ 
partment of Epidemiology and Pub¬ 
lic Health, the event brought together 
leaders in the field of medical care 
from all parts of this country and 
Canada, many of whom have worked 
or studied with Professor Falk. Ses¬ 
sions dealt with health insurance, 
group health center organization, 
and teaching and research in med¬ 
ical care—three areas in which Pro¬ 
fessor Falk has made major contri¬ 
butions. 

The main speakers were Dr. Eve¬ 
line Burns, professor emeritus, Co¬ 
lumbia University School of Social 
Work; James Brindle, President of 
the Health Insurance Plan of Great¬ 
er New York; and Solomon J. Axel¬ 
rod, Professor of Medical Care 
Organization at the University of 
Michigan. Participants included Dr. 
E. M. Cohart, Dr. E. R. Weinerman, 
John D. Thompson and Donald C. 
Riedel, all of the Yale Department of 
Epidemiology and Public Health. 

Dr. Buxton Honored 

Dr. C. Lee Buxton, professor of ob¬ 
stetrics and gynecology, received 



Dr. Buxton fright) accepts the Ortho Medal from 
Dr. Richard J. Blandau, president of the 
American Fertility Society. 


the Ortho Medal Award at the an¬ 
nual meeting of the American Fer¬ 
tility Society in San Francisco last 
March. The award, which was es¬ 
tablished in 1960 by the Ortho Re¬ 
search Foundation, is given each 
year to the individual who, in the 
opinion of the Fertility Society, has 
done outstanding service in labora¬ 
tory or clinical investigation in the 
field of reproduction. 

The award consists of a medal 
and a $1,000 honorarium. Dr. Bux¬ 
ton, a past president of the Society, 
has received international acclaim 
for his role in the successful fight 
to revise the birth control laws in 
the State of Connecticut. 

The Francis Gilman Blake Award 

Dr. Daniel S. Rowe, assistant pro¬ 
fessor of pediatrics, received the 
1968 Francis Gilman Blake Award, 
given annually to that faculty mem¬ 
ber of the School of Medicine desig¬ 
nated by the senior class as the 
most outstanding teacher of the med¬ 
ical sciences. This annual award, 
sponsored by the Beta Zeta chapter 
of Nu Sigma Nu, honors a former 
dean and professor of medicine. 

Madeline Stanton Retires 

Madeline E. Stanton, librarian of his¬ 
torical collections at the Yale Medi¬ 
cal Library, retired in June. During 


23 





An inscribed silver bowl was presented to Miss 
Stanton at a tea given in her honor in June. 


her 35 years of devoted service, the 
nucleus of the library was formed, 
the medical library wing was built, 
and hundreds of students of medi¬ 
cal history throughout the world 
have been assisted in their pursuits. 

She has also had an important 
role in contributing to the history 
of medicine as assistant editor of 
the Journal of the History of Medi¬ 
cine and Allied Sciences; as co¬ 
author with Dr. fohn F. Fulton and 
Frederick G. Kilgour of Yale Medi¬ 
cal Library: The Formation and 
Growth of Its Historical Library, and 
as a contributor to professional jour¬ 
nals. Her most recent article, “Har¬ 
vey Cushing, Book Collector" ap¬ 
peared in the Journal of the Amer¬ 
ican Medical Association in April 
1965. 

Miss Stanton was one of those 
responsible for completing two of 
John Fulton’s posthumous works, 
the second edition of his Bibiliog- 
raphy of Robert Boyle and the sec¬ 
ond edition of his Selected Readings 
in the History of Physiology, as well 
as for the second edition of Harvey 
Cushing’s A Bio-Bibliography of An¬ 
dreas Vesalius. 

Fortunately her association with 
Yale has not ended, for she will con¬ 
tinue to be available as historical 
consultant to the library. The Made¬ 
line Earle Stanton Historical Book 
Fund, established by Associates of 
the Yale Medical Library and oth¬ 
ers, will enable scholars and friends 
to honor her. 


New Appointments 

Dr. William Wilton Douglas, an au¬ 
thority in the field of autonomic 
physiology and neuropharmacology, 
has been appointed professor of 
pharmacology. 

Dr. Douglas received his medical 
education at the University of Glas¬ 
gow where he was awarded the Ch. 
B. degree in 1946 and the M.D. de¬ 
gree in 1949. His first academic ap¬ 
pointment was instructor in physi¬ 
ology at Aberdeen University in 
Scotland. In 1950 he was appointed 
to the staff of the physiology and 
pharmacology division of the Na¬ 
tional Institute for Medical Research 
in London and in 1952 to the depart¬ 
ment of pharmacology of Columbia 
University, College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, as associate. In 1956 
he received an appointment as asso¬ 
ciate professor of pharmacology at 
Albert Einstein College of Medicine 
and in 1958 he was promoted to 
professor of pharmacology. 


Dr. Paul Greengard, who also 
comes to Yale from Albert Einstein 
College of Medicine, has been ap¬ 
pointed professor of pharmacology. 
He is noted for his work on the 
peripheral nervous system and the 
biochemical basis of brain function. 

His postgraduate study was in 
neurophysiology in the department 
of biophysics at Johns Hopkins Uni¬ 
versity where he received the Ph. D. 
degree in 1953. He then spent five 
years in England studying brain me¬ 
tabolism at the University of London 
and enzyme chemistry at Molteno 
Institute, Cambridge University, and 
doing advanced work in biochemis¬ 
try and pharmacology of the nervous 
system at the National Institute for 
Medical Research in London. From 
1959 until this year he was associate 
professor of pharmacology at Albert 
Einstein. 

Dr. Robert Victor Paul Hutter, a 
distinguished morphologist and di¬ 
agnostician, has been appointed pro- 


A portrait of Dr. Milton /. E. Senn, Sterling Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, was unveiled in 
April as part of a ceremony dedicating the Milton J. E. Senn School and Clinic at High Meadows, a 
treatment center for emotion ally disturbed children in Hamden, Connecticut. Dr. Senn was instru¬ 
mental in founding High Meadows in 1950 and was the first chairman of its board of trustees. 
Shown here with Dr. Senn is Dr. Anna Freud who spent a month at Yale last spring participating in 
a series of seminars jointly sponsored by the Law School and the Child Study Center. The creator 
of child psychoanalysis, Dr. Freud is director of the Hampstead Child Therapy Clinic in London. 



24 





















fessor of pathology. Noted for his 
work in cancer pathology, he has 
been associated for the past 12 years 
with Memorial Center for Cancer 
and Allied Diseases in New York 
and with Sloan-Kettering Institute 
since 1960. 

Dr. Hutter received the M.D. de¬ 
gree from the State University of 
New York at Syracuse in 1954 and 
did postgraduate work in pathology 
at the Yale medical school for the 
following two years. In 1956 Dr. Hut¬ 
ter joined the Memorial Center for 
Cancer and Allied Diseases where 
he was chief resident in pathology 
in 1957-58. He was attending pathol¬ 
ogist when he accepted his present 
appointment. 

He has also been visiting pathol¬ 
ogist at James Ewing Hospital in 
New York and consultant in pathol¬ 
ogy and cytopathology to the U.S. 
Public Health Service Hospital on 
Staten Island and the Mary Swift 
Tumor Clinic and Registry in Butte, 
Montana. 

A leading pediatric hematologist, 
Dr. Howard Allen Pearson, has been 
appointed professor of pediatrics. 
His particular interest is in the ge¬ 
netic aspects of hemoglobinopathies 
which will involve his close associa¬ 
tion with the interdepartmental ge¬ 
netics section of pediatrics and 
medicine. 

Dr. Pearson attended Dartmouth 
Medical School and received the de¬ 
gree of M.D. from the Harvard Med¬ 
ical School in 1954. From 1958 to 
1962 he was assistant chief of the 
pediatrics service and assistant head 
of clinical hematology at the U.S. 
Naval Hospital, National Naval Med¬ 
ical Center, Bethesda. During that 
period he was also clinical instruc¬ 
tor in pediatrics at Georgetown Uni¬ 
versity Medical School. After a year 
as clinical assistant professor of 
pediatrics at Howard University 
School of Medicine, he joined the 
faculty of the University of Florida 
College of Medicine as assistant pro¬ 
fessor of pediatrics. In 1964 he was 
named associate professor and in 


1966 he became a full professor. He 
has also served as a consultant for 
the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear 
Studies since 1963. 

Dr. John Schulman, Jr., has been ap¬ 
pointed associate professor of clin¬ 
ical medicine and is the new director 
of ambulatory services for the De¬ 
partment of Internal Medicine. He 
comes to New Haven from Boston 
where he was a member of the Har¬ 
vard Medical School faculty and on 
the staffs of the Boston City and 
Beth Israel Hospitals. Dr. Schulman 
received his M.D. degree from the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1946 
and was awarded the M.P.H. degree 
by Harvard this past spring. 

Promotions 

The following members of the med¬ 
ical faculty have been promoted to 
the rank of professor: 

Dr. Arend Bouhuys, professor of 
medicine and epidemiology, has 
been a member of the Yale faculty 
and a fellow of the John B. Pierce 
Foundation Laboratory since 1964 
and is an authority in the field of 
pulmonary mechanics. A native of 
the Netherlands, he received his 
M.D. degree from the University of 
Utrecht in 1948 and his Ph.D. de¬ 
gree from the University of Amster¬ 
dam in 1956. After serving on the 
faculty at the University of Leiden, 
Dr. Bouhuys came to the United 
States in 1962. He was an assistant 
professor of physiology and medi¬ 
cine at Emory University in Atlanta 
before coming to Yale. In July 1968 
he was appointed chief of the pul¬ 
monary section of the Department 
of Internal Medicine. 

Dr. Edmund S. Crelin, professor 
of anatomy, received his Ph.D. de¬ 
gree from Yale in 1951 and has been 
a member of the Department of 
Anatomy since that time. He is 
known for his significant contribu¬ 
tions to the knowledge of bone and 
cartilage development. He has been 
responsible for the introduction and 
successful development of a system 
of closed circuit television for the 


teaching of anatomy at this school. 
Last year Dr. Crelin received the 
singular honor of being named the 
next editor of Cray's Anatomy. 

Dr. Ira S. Goldenberg, professor 
of clinical surgery, has been a mem¬ 
ber of the Yale faculty since 1957 
and has done considerable research 
in cancer therapy. He received his 
M.D. degree in 1951 from the Uni¬ 
versity of Michigan and served both 
his internship and his residency at 
Yale-New Haven Hospital. He was 
appointed to the faculty as instruc¬ 
tor in surgery in 1957. In 1958 he 
was made assistant professor and 
was promoted to associate professor 
in 1964. 

Dr. Seymour R. Lipsky, professor 
of pharmacology and medicine, re¬ 
ceived his M.D. degree from the 
State University of New York Col¬ 
lege of Medicine in Brooklyn in 
1949 and came to Yale in 1952 from 
the University of California. In 1955, 
after three years of additional post- 

Dr. Samuel Ritvo, clinical professor of psychia¬ 
try and a member of the staff of the Child Study 
Center, was installed as president of the 
American Psychoanalytical Association at the 
55th annual meeting in Boston last spring. Dr. 
Ritvo is concurrently president of the Western 
New England Institute for Psychoanalysis, with 
headquarters in New Haven, and a charter 
member and past president of the Western New 
England Psychoanalytic Society. 



25 





graduate work, he was appointed 
to the faculty in the Department of 
Internal Medicine. In 1966 he was 
made associate professor of phar¬ 
macology and medicine. Dr. Lipsky, 
who has gained international recog¬ 
nition for his work in mass spec- 
tometry and gas chromatography, as 
well as for important contributions 
in the chemistry of lipids, is director 
of the Section of Physical Sciences 
at this school. 

Dr. Alexander R. Martin, profes¬ 
sor of physiology, is a neurophysi¬ 
ologist who came to Yale from the 
University of Utah. A Canadian by 
birth, he received his B.Sc. degree 
in 1951 and the M.Sc. degree in 
1953, both from the University of 
Manitoba. He received the Ph.D. in 
1955 from the University of London 
and subsequently returned to Can¬ 
ada for two years of postdoctoral 
research at the Montreal Neuro¬ 
logical Institute. He was granted a 
leave of absence to study as a re¬ 
search fellow at Monash University 
in Australia in 1964. He joined the 
Yale faculty as an associate profes¬ 
sor in 1966. 

Dr. John T. Mallams, professor of 
clinical radiology, came to Yale in 
July 1967, as a visiting professor of 
radiology. He received his M.D. de¬ 
gree from Temple University in 1946. 
He served on the faculty at Baylor 
University College of Medicine from 
1952 to 1954 and was director of 
irradiation therapy and of the Sam¬ 
mons Research Division of the Bay¬ 
lor Medical Center in Dallas from 
1954 to 1967. He was appointed pro¬ 
fessor of radiology at the University 
of Texas Southwestern Medical 
School in Dallas in 1966. Dr. Mal¬ 
lams’ laboratory research is con¬ 
cerned with the structure and 
function of blood vessels in tumors. 
He will also be in charge of the 
clinical investigative program in the 
Radiotherapy Section of the Depart¬ 
ment of Radiology. 

Dr. Richard P. Spencer, professor 
of nuclear medicine, received his 
M.D. degree from the University of 
Southern California in 1954 and his 


Ph.D. degree from Harvard in 1961. 
Prior to coming to Yale in 1963, he 
was chief of the Isotopes Division 
at the Veterans Administration Hos¬ 
pital in Buffalo, New York, and a 
member of the faculty at the Uni¬ 
versity of Buffalo School of Medi¬ 
cine. His clinical investigations have 
led to the development of new 
techniques in diagnosis, including 
computer techniques which can 
make use of short-lived isotopes. 

The following members of the 
faculty were promoted to the rank 
of associate professor, effective July 
1: George K. Aghajanian, M.D., psy¬ 
chiatry; Vincent A.-T. Andriole, 
M.D., medicine; Boris M. Astrachan, 
M.D., psychiatry; William A. Crea- 
sey, D.Phil., phamacology; Jack R. 
Henderson, Ph.D., epidemiology; 
Don C. Higgins, M.D., neurology; 
Frederick L. Holmes, Ph.D., history 
of science and medicine; David G. 
Johns, Ph.D., pharmacology and 
medicine; Mary Frances Keohane, 
M.D., clinical radiology; Herbert A. 
Lubs, M.D., medicine and pediatrics. 

Also, F. Patrick McKegney, M.D., 
psychiatry and medicine; Eric W. 
Mood, M.P.H., public health (envi¬ 
ronmental health); Nea Mae Norton, 
M.S.S., clinical psychiatry (social 
work); Rose J. Papac, M.D., medi¬ 
cine; Frank F. Richards, M.D., medi¬ 
cine; Albert Rothenberg, M.D., 
psychiatry; Daniel S. Rowe, M.D., 
clinical pediatrics; Robert L. Scheig, 
M.D., medicine; Michael H. Sheard, 
M.D., psychiatry; and Claudewell S. 
Thomas, M.D., psychiatry. 

New Books 

PROBLEMS IN CHILD BEHAVIOR 
AND DEVELOPMENT by Milton J. 
E. Senn, M.D., Sterling Professor of 
pediatrics and psychiatry and for¬ 
mer director, Yale Child Study Cen¬ 
ter, and Albert J. Solnit, M.D., pro¬ 
fessor of pediatrics and psychiatry 
and director, Yale Child Study Cen¬ 
ter. (Lea & Febiger) 

In their introduction to this book, 
the authors make clear their objec¬ 
tives. Aimed at the general practi¬ 
tioner and the pediatrician, this 


compact volume is replete with 
practical information, together with 
case histories which serve to illumi¬ 
nate specific problems. 

A goal of the book is to assist the 
pediatrician or general practitioner 
who has had little or no psychiatric 
training but who wishes to help his 
patient and his patient’s family in 
coping with or preventing develop¬ 
mental problems and psychologic 
disorders. Another stated purpose is 
to demonstrate how and under what 
circumstances a doctor might make 
use of non-medical persons, such as 
social workers and psychologists, 
in the best interests of patients. 

The authors move along chrono¬ 
logically in their discussion of the 
stages of life, starting with the par¬ 
ents’ attitude concerning their incip¬ 
ient offspring, touching on healthy 
and pathologic signposts that may 
appear along the way, and continu¬ 
ing to the period of mid-adolescence. 
Simple developmental charts, spaced 
at intervals, note characteristic be¬ 
havior and deviations from the 
norm in the case of both parent and 
child. 

The final chapter deals with a 
group of special problems such as 
divorce, adoption, suicide, fatal and 
incurable illness and other traumatic 
emergency situations. Throughout, 
the authors’ approach is marked by 
practicality, simplicity and flexi¬ 
bility. 

YOUNG RADICALS: NOTES ON 
COMMITTED YOUTH by Kenneth 
Keniston, D. Phil., associate profes¬ 
sor of psychology (Harcourt, Brace 
& World). On the basis of his highly 
sensitive and thoughtful first vol¬ 
ume, The Uncommitted, published 
in 1965, Dr. Keniston was invited to 
interview and study in depth 14 
leaders working out of the national 
office of Vietnam Summer, a coun¬ 
trywide campaign composed of 
young people opposed to the Amer¬ 
ican involvement in Southeast Asia. 

Most of those interviewed were 
in their mid-twenties and from rela¬ 
tively privileged backgrounds. These 
“young radicals” declined to take ad- 


26 






vantage of a variety of respectable 
careers open to them, preferring in¬ 
stead to work within a movement 
which provided a sense of social 
significance and moral and ethical 
satisfaction. 

Through experiences derived from 
their door-to-door canvassing in 
slum areas, several basic assump¬ 
tions evolved. The young people be¬ 
came convinced that many of the 
pronouncements and policies of the 
government were made as a result 
of manipulation by industrial and 
military interests. They concluded 
that people should be permitted to 
participate in the formulation of de¬ 
cisions which would affect their own 
destinies and that present inequi¬ 
table institutions such as prejudice 


and suffering must be eradicated by 
greatly expanded poverty programs 
and by such agencies as would do 
combat against the general lack of 
involvement and inertia of man to¬ 
wards his fellowman. 

In joining the movement, the 
young people were sidestepping the 
middle class aspirations of their 
parents. Keniston writes: “. . . the 
wariness of these young radicals 
toward some of their elders seemed 
less a rebellious projection of hatred 
of their fathers than a reflection of 
a very real difference in outlook and 
style that separate the generations.” 
ANATOMY OF THE NEWBORN: 
AN ATLAS. By Edmund S. Crelin, 
Ph.D., professor of anatomy (Lea & 
Febiger). This volume, sui generis 


among atlases, contains more than 
350 color illustrations relating to the 
anatomy of the newborn. Professor 
Crelin was responsible for each dis¬ 
section and subsequent drawing and, 
as a consequence, the atlas has re¬ 
markable continuity in the size, 
structure and order of its illustrative 
material. 

By virtue of its oversize pages and 
its makeup, Anatomy of the New¬ 
born is well-suited to the laboratory 
needs of students and doctors as 
well as midwives and nurses spe¬ 
cializing in the health care of the 
newborn infant. 

THE STORY OF MY LIFE by J. 
Marion Sims, M.D., with a preface 
by C. Lee Buxton, M.D., professor of 
obstetrics and gynecology (Da Capo 
Press, 1968 edition). 

Sims, a native of South Carolina, 
was a skillful surgeon of the 19th 
Century, responsible for the estab¬ 
lishment of the first gynecologic 
hospital in the United States, Wom¬ 
an’s Hospital in New York City, as 
well as a pioneer in the treatment 
of vesicovaginal fistulae and other 
medical and surgical problems com¬ 
mon to women. He was equally 
renowned in this country and abroad 
for his innovative techniques and 
for making gynecology and obstet¬ 
rics respected medical services. 

Dr. Sims’ autobiography was first 
published by D. Appleton & Co. in 
1889. 


Grover Francis Powers, M.D. 

Dr. Grover Francis Powers, a loved 
and respected member of the facul¬ 
ty of the Yale School of Medicine 
for 31 years, died at his home in 
New Haven at the age of 80 on 
April 19. 

He was born in Colfax, Indiana, 
in 1887, attended Purdue Univer¬ 
sity as an undergraduate and re¬ 
ceived his M.D. at Johns Hopkins 
University in 1913. From the time 
of his graduation until he joined the 
Yale faculty in 1921 he served as a 



Yaie President Kingman 
Brewster, Jr., was the chief 
speaker at a ceremony for 
Dean Rediich at the Con¬ 
necticut Mentai Health 
Center. Colleagues honored 
Dr. Rediich as the Center’s 
first director (from 1964 to 
1967) with the presentation 
of a bronze bust by sculptor 
Lewis Iselin. 


27 













member of the house staff and fac¬ 
ulty at Johns Hopkins. The remain¬ 
der of his career until retirement in 
1952, except for one year as pedia¬ 
trician-in-chief at the Henry Ford 
Hospital, was spent at Yale. 

His career is well summarized in 
the citation read when he was 
awarded the Yale Medal in 1966 for 
outstanding service to the Univer¬ 
sity. Referring to his distinguished 
service as chairman of the Depart¬ 
ment of Pediatrics for 25 years it 
said in part, “His stewardship ele¬ 
vated that department to a position 
of undisputed leadership in this 
country. Foreign governments, ed¬ 
ucational institutions, professional 
associations, and foundations have, 
through honorary degrees, citations 
and awards, acknowledged his fame 
as a physician and a scholar. It is, 
however, as a teacher and a clini¬ 
cian that he has made his most nota¬ 
ble contributions to the medical pro¬ 
fession, to this community, and to 
this university.” 

Among other honors were hon¬ 
orary degrees of Doctor of Science 
from Purdue University (1935), In¬ 
diana University (1949), the Borden 
Award of the American Academy 
of Pediatrics (1947), the John How¬ 
land Award of the American Pedi¬ 
atric Society (1953), and the award 
of the Joseph P. Kennedy Founda¬ 
tion (1963). 


He was not a theoretical scientist 
but rather a clinical investigator. 
His research dealt primarily with 
such practical problems of chil¬ 
dren’s health as rickets, infantile 
diarrhea and the feeding of infants. 
Nevertheless, he actively encour¬ 
aged research of a more theoretical 
nature in the laboratories of his 
department that gained internation¬ 
al recognition. 

After his retirement, he devoted 
much of his time to the Southbury 
Training School, which he had been 
instrumental in establishing, and to 
encouraging research and improved 
care for mentally retarded children. 

Impressive as these honors and 
achievements in the national scene 
may have been, Dr. Powers will be 
remembered by a generation of Yale 
alumni as the compassionate physi¬ 
cian. A man who served on his house 
staff almost forty years ago said re¬ 
cently, “No one who worked with 
him failed to be impressed with his 
deep concern for the individual pa¬ 
tient or forgot the lessons he taught 
by example. He seldom criticized a 
student or house officer directly but 
he could make one so ashamed of 
his negligence or lack of judgment 
that recollection of the experience 
lasted for a lifetime. A sick child 
was not a case on his service but a 
subject of his personal concern. His 
interns and residents spent many 


long nights patiently watching in¬ 
fants with diphtheritic croup and 
children passing through the crises! 
of lobar pneumonia, before the days 
of antibiotics, not because they were 
all naturally endowed with the same 
compassion but because they could 
expect a visit from the professor 
during the small hours of the morn¬ 
ing. Above all, he was a good doc¬ 
tor.” 

V.W.L. 


Dr. Powers 



28 







Alumni News 


1913 

A card from RALPH E. TAYLOR ex¬ 
pressed his regret at not being able 
to come to the June Alumni Day Pro¬ 
gram and at the fact that after 50 
years of practice in internal medi¬ 
cine and surgery, he had retired. 

1918 

A letter from HOWARD P. SAWYER 
indicates that his grandson and 
namesake is enrolled in the entering 
class of Yale College for 1968. 

1922 

GEORGE T. PACK was the recipient 
of the 1968 Distinguished Service 
Award by the American Society of 
Abdominal Surgeons in recognition 
of his accomplishments as surgeon, 
researcher, and medical educator. 

1923 

WILLIAM COHEN, class secretary, 
writes: “Six members of the class 
attended our 45th reunion: FRANK 
G. AMATRUDA, WILLIAM COHEN, 
JOSEPH EPSTEIN, GEORGE H. 
GILDERSLEEVE, SAMUEL KARE- 
LITZ and JACOB MELLION. While 
this is a relatively small number, it 
is exactly one-third of the present 
survivors of our class. Jack Mellion 
is the only one of our returning 
group who is retired. Far from being 
a bored senior citizen, his many hob¬ 
bies, particularly horticulture, keep 
him happily occupied. 

“The speakers' program in the af¬ 
ternoon was most interesting and 
provocative. During the social hour 
which followed, we renewed ac¬ 
quaintances with many alumni from 
other classes. 

“Our class dinner was a very in¬ 
formal affair in the charming home 
of our gracious hosts, Gertrude and 
Frank Amatruda. We were surprised 
and delighted to find that Dr. and 
Mrs. MAXWELL LEAR (’ll) had 
been invited to join us. Max was an 
instructor in surgery during our se¬ 
nior year and his close ties with our 
class have earned for him our warm 
and affectionate regard. The evening 
passed quickly with stimulating dis¬ 
cussions and reminiscences. 

“To our classmates who did not at¬ 
tend our reunion, we send our sin¬ 
cere greetings and hope we will have 
an opportunity to meet in the fu¬ 
ture.” 


1928 

EDWARD L. HOWES reports favor¬ 
ably on the 40th reunion of the class 
with 14 out of 39 members attending. 
Present at dinner at The Graduate 
Club were MAX ALPERT, BER¬ 
NARD BRODY, JOHN BURKE, 
BERT COMEAU, DON DIAL, UNO 
HELGESSON, ED HOWES, SHEL¬ 
DON JACOBSON, REG JOHNSON, 
FRED KOJIS, ROBERT RUBEN- 
STEIN, JOHN RUSSEL, ALVIN 
SCHAYE, LEW SCHEUER and 
guests, Professor and Mrs. Ira His- 
cock. Dr. John R. Paul sent greetings 
and regrets. 

MARY MICHAL and GEORGE WIL¬ 
SON who had planned to attend 
were unable to join the group at the 
last moment. Long distance record 
was set by Sheldon Jacobson of Van¬ 
couver, Washington. Lew Scheuer’s 
son, Alfred, graduated from the Yale 
medical school in the same week. Dr. 
Howes, the class secretary wrote: 
“Letters from some who could not 
attend were read. DAN MULVIHILL 
is retiring as associate professor of 
clinical surgery at N.Y.U. and be¬ 
comes assistant director of the 
American College of Surgeons. 


Dr. M ichal 

HARRY OARD is with the Health 
Department of St. Petersburg, Flor¬ 
ida. GISSLER, MICHALOVER and 
EGLI give permanent addresses in 
Florida suggesting retirement. REY- 
NER writes from the Professional 
Building in Detroit. Ed Howes, your 
scribe, with his son, Dr. Ed Jr., have 
just finished their book on healing.” 
MARY B. HARRIS MICHAL writes: 
“I am a staff physician at Broughton 
Hospital (the State Psychiatric Hos¬ 
pital) at Morganton, North Caro¬ 
lina.” 


Members of the Class of '28 and their wives at the 40th reunion 




29 










1929 

LOUIS LICHTENSTEIN, in Japan as 
guest of the Japan Orthopedic Asso¬ 
ciation, lectured at universities in 
Okayama, Kyoto, Tokyo, and Sendai 
in April. 



This portrait of Dr. J RosweJJ Gallagher. '30, 
was unveiled in May at the Countway Library at 
Harvard. The painting is the work of Dwight 
Shepler and was commissioned by friends and 
colleagues of Dr. Gallagher, founder and former 
chief of the Adolescent Unit at The Children's 
Hospital Medical Center in Boston He is now 
clinical professor of pediatrics at Yale and was 
recently appointed president of the newly 
organized Society for Adolescent Medicine. 

1932 

MYRON E. WEGMAN, dean of the 
University of Michigan’s School of 
Public Health, was appointed to a 
14-member steering committee for 
Project Head Start by Sargent Shri- 
ver, then director of the Office of 
Economic Opportunity. 

1933 

LEE E. FARR has departed from 
Houston to join the California State 
Health Department. His new address 
is State Department of Health, 2151 
Berkeley Way, Berkeley, California 
94704. 

1934 

Development of the Regional Medi¬ 
cal Program for the tri-state area 
covering New Hampshire, Massa¬ 
chusetts, and Rhode Island will be 
under the supervision of LEONA 
BAUMGARTNER. Dr. Baumgartner 
received the honorary degree of Doc¬ 
tor of Science at the commencement 


of the New York Medical College in 
June for her leadership in the fields 
of public health and preventive med¬ 
icine. 

GILBERT E. MOORE is currently 
medical director for the Hughes Air¬ 
craft Company in Culver City, Cali¬ 
fornia. 

1935 

ASHBEL C. WILLIAMS has been 
made a councilor of the Lahey Clinic 
Foundation Alumni Association. 
Councilors from all over the world, 
all former Lahey Clinic residents or 
fellows, will meet this fall in Boston 
to attend professional seminars deal¬ 
ing with the newest developments in 
medical care and treatment. 

1938 

The 20th reunion of the class of 1938 
was held at The Graduate Club on 
June 8. Present were ROY N. BAR¬ 
NETT, ARTHUR S. REYNOLDS, 
CHARLES J. PETRILLO, LESTER J. 
WALLMAN, LOUIS G. WELT, 
AGNES V. BARTLETT and JOHN 
DILLON, plus a number of wives. 
Dr. Petrillo, dinner chairman, re¬ 
ported: “Dr. Bartlett, class secretary, 
conducted a very short meeting after 
the dinner and also presented a most 
interesting account together with ex¬ 
cellent color slides of her recent trip 
to Japan. The class was saddened to 
hear of the death of two of our mem¬ 
bers since the previous reunion five 
years ago. Those who had died were 
ED ROSSETT and ART SULLIVAN. 
We also learned that HENRY L. 
CARIDEO’s wife had died recently. 

“It is planned to have informal re¬ 
unions more frequently than the 
routine five-year meetings.” 

1939 

JOHN P. FERGUSON reports that 
his son, John, who graduated from 
Yale College in 1965, is winding up 
his junior year in medicine at St. 
Louis University School of Medi¬ 
cine. 

JOHN H. WENTWORTH, after 20 
years of radiologic practice in New 
York and Long Island, has moved to 
California and is with the Kaiser- 
Permanente Medical Group. 

1942 

VINCENT J. COLLINS, director of 
clinical research in anesthesiology 
at the Hektoen Institute for Medical 


Research in Chicago and director of | • 
anesthesiology at Cook County Hos- 1 
pital, was a chief panelist at a con¬ 
ference sponsored by the AMA Com¬ 
mittee on Medicine and Religion. Dr. 
Collins presented his “score of j 
dying” on a program entitled “The j 
Limits of Medical Responsibility in 
the Prolongation of Life.” 

MAURICE TULIN has left private | 
practice to become director of am¬ 
bulatory services and attending phy- 
sician at the North Shore Hospital in i 
Manhasset, Long Island. 

1943 December 

HUNTER H. COMLY has been an as- ; 
sociate professor in the department 
of child psychiatry at the University 
of Iowa Medical School since 1967. 

1943 March 

The class of March 1943 held its 25th | 
reunion in June. Attending the din¬ 
ner at The Graduate Club were HIL¬ 
LIARD SPITZ, LEONARD KEMLER, 
GERARD FOUNTAIN, ROCKO FA- 
SANELLA, JON LANMAN, HENRY 
MARKLEY, FRED WALDRON, 
JOHN WEBER, MORRIS WESSEL, 
RALPH ALLEY, LYCURGUS DA- 
VEY, DOROTHEA PECK DWYER 
and BOB WYATT. Dr. Franz Gold¬ 
man, formerly a member of the De¬ 
partment of Public Health at Yale, 
and now professor emeritus of med¬ 
ical care at the Harvard School of 
Public Health, discussed “Current 
Trends in the Financing of Medical 
Care in the United States.” A lively 
discussion followed his presenta¬ 
tion. 

JOHN BROBECK, chairman of the 
physiology department at the Uni¬ 
versity of Pennsylvania School of 
Medicine, wrote, sending his regrets 
and wishing he could have joined the 
group in New Haven. One of his four 
children was graduating from Whea¬ 
ton College on that day. 

ROCKO FASANELLA participated 
in a discussion on anterior segment 
surgery at the first South African In¬ 
ternational Ophthalmological Meet¬ 
ing in Johannesburg in September. 
SOPHIE C. TRENT was a delegate to 
the Medical Women’s International 
Association which met in Vienna in 
June, explaining her absence from 
the reunion. Dr. Trent, who practices 
internal medicine in Meriden, Con¬ 
necticut, has had considerable ex- 


30 








perience in the area of tropical medi¬ 
cine, having served a residency at 
the School of Tropical Medicine in 
San Juan, as chief of the medical de¬ 
partment at Municipal Hospital, Fa¬ 
jardo, Puerto Rico, and as author of 
several articles which have contrib¬ 
uted to the field. In addition to her 
medical practice, she is the second 
woman in the history of Meriden to 
serve on the Board of Apportion¬ 
ment and Taxation, the only woman 
in a group of five recently named to 
the Board of Trustees of Brown Uni¬ 
versity. Leisure time credits include 
a book of poetry, Birds of Passage, 
and several awards for her painting. 

1945 

EDWARD M. DANIELS is now a 
training analyst and recently became 
president-elect of the Boston Psy¬ 
choanalytic Society and Institute. 
SCOTT HEATH reports that he spent 
five months in the U.S.S.R. in 1967, 
visiting eye facilities under the terms 
of the exchange program between 
the U.S. Public Health Service and 
the Soviet Ministry of Health. He 
rounded off his travels with a vaca¬ 
tion on Lake Baikal, traveling by 
trans-Siberian railroad to Irkutsk. 

1946 

AARON T. BECK, now associate pro¬ 
fessor of psychiatry at the Univer¬ 
sity of Pennsylvania and chief of sec¬ 
tion, Department of Psychiatry, at 
the Philadelphia General Hospital, is 
the author of Depression: Clinical, 
Experimental, and Theoretical As¬ 
pects. Published by Hoeber Medical 
Division of Harper & Row, the book 
presents a broad-survey of the stud¬ 
ies made on depression and includes 
an analysis of investigations con¬ 
cerning causes, symptoms, diagnosis, 
and treatment. 

CHARLES S. JUDD, JR. was the re¬ 
cipient of the Robins Community 
Service Award at the 112th annual 
banquet of the Hawaii Medical Asso¬ 


ciation. Dr. Judd, who is now living 
in Samoa, made a brief stop in Hono¬ 
lulu on his way to New Haven to at¬ 
tend his 25th reunion at Yale College. 
PHILLIPS ROTH writes: “I have 
been called to active duty in the re¬ 
serve call up and am now psychia¬ 
trist at McChord Air Force Base, 
Tacoma, Washington.” 

R. BRUCE THAYER, JR. has been ap¬ 
pointed medical director of Connec¬ 
ticut Medical Service. He has been 
in the general practice of medicine in 
Enfield, Connecticut, since 1949 and 
has served for three years as a mem¬ 
ber of the CMS board of trustees and 
for eight years as a member of its 
Medical Advisory Committee. 

1948 

Cocktails and a steak dinner at the 
New Haven Medical Association 
building on Whitney Avenue pro¬ 
vided the setting for the 20th reunion 
of the class of 1948. In attendance 
were: RUSS BARRNETT, ART 
COLEMAN, JULIE FRIEDEN, PAUL 
GOLDSTEIN, PAUL KOEHLER, BOB 
LEMPKE, JOHN MORRISON, GABE 
SAVIANO with their wives and 
JOCK BISHOP without his. Faculty 
members present, together with their 
wives included: Drs. William U. 
Gardner, Harry S. M. Greene, and 
Gerald Klatskin as well as Dr. Abra¬ 
ham White, formerly at Yale, now on 
the faculty of the Albert Einstein 
College of Medicine. Dinner chair¬ 
man Dr. Koehler distributed reunion 
booklets prepared from question¬ 
naires completed by classmates. 
GRIFFITH B. HEROLD was elected 
chairman of the Plastic Surgery Re¬ 
search Council for 1968-69. 

1949 

WILLIAM H. SEWELL writes: “I am 
very encouraged with my results of 
my triple pedicle operation for coro¬ 
nary disease.” 

1952 

JOSEPH GARLAND is practicing 
psychiatry full time in Toledo, Ohio, 
specializing in the treatment of 
adults and adolescents. 

1953 

Information from ALLEN CHET- 
RICK, dinner chairman: “The class 
of 1953 held its 15th reunion on June 
8, 1968. Surgical and medical grand 
rounds in the morning reminded us 


that the high caliber of these ses¬ 
sions remains unchanged. 

‘‘An appetizing buffet luncheon 
afforded an opportunity for lively 
conversation on current classmate 
activities. CLAUDE BLOCH and 
spouse were at this luncheon but a 
‘radiological emergency’ in N.Y.C. 
curtailed his day in New Haven. The 
afternoon speakers dealt with a va¬ 
riety of cogent issues. These included 
the current Yale Medical School 
Alumni drive and the changing medi¬ 
cal school curriculum at Yale with 
closer community ties and health de¬ 
livery plans as well as a prognostica¬ 
tion of the future community hospi¬ 
tal in the U.S.A. and the drug problem 
in our country. One voice in the wil¬ 
derness drew warm applause when 
he extolled the virtues of the rare 
medical school of the past—Yale in¬ 
cluded — which dedicated itself pri¬ 
marily to teaching and research. 
JOSE RAMIREZ-RIVERA remained 
through this session but his talents 
were subsequently needed in Balti¬ 
more. We are told BERT KUSSEROW 
was seen wandering around the 
premises also. 

“A cocktail hourfsj at the Hark- 
ness Dormitory soon erased the so¬ 
ber cares of the day. 

‘‘The highlight of our reunion was 
a truly sumptuous dinner at the Tiv¬ 
oli. Those attending included: HAL 
BORNSTEIN, the JIM DUNNs, the 
IRV GOLDBERGs, the AL KERO- 
ACKs, the FRED LANEs, the BOB 
MELNICKs, the BILL WILSONs, the 
JIM YOUNGs, and the AL CHET- 
RICKs. Hopefully the 20th reunion 
will bring back more of our great 
class.” 

IRVING H. GOLDBERG has received 
an appointment as professor of med¬ 
icine at the Harvard Medical School 
and chairman of the division of med¬ 
ical sciences of the faculty of arts 
and sciences of Harvard University. 
He joined the medical school and the 
staff of Beth Israel Hospital in 1964. 

Prior to his association with Har¬ 
vard, Dr. Goldberg was awarded the 
Ph.D. degree from The Rockefeller 
University in New York City and 
was appointed to the faculty of med¬ 
icine at the University of Chicago. 
He is an authority on the molecular 
mechanism of agents affecting nu¬ 
cleic acid in protein synthesis. 


31 


Dr. Goidberg 

1954 

LT. COL. ROBERT J. T. JOY has re¬ 
ceived a new assignment as chief, 
Medical Research Branch, Medical 
Research and Development Com¬ 
mand, Office of the Surgeon General 
of the Army. During the past year, 
Col. Joy received his wings as a flight 
surgeon and completed a staff col¬ 
lege course at the Armed Forces 
Staff College in Norfolk, Virginia. 
EVA HENRIKSEN MACLEAN has 
been promoted to associate profes¬ 
sor of surgery (anesthesiology) at 
the University of Southern Califor¬ 
nia. The MacLeans have two small 
girls, Elizabeth and Mary Ann. 



1956 

ROSALIE BURNS, assistant profes¬ 
sor of neurology at the Woman's 
Medical College of Pennsylvania, has 
been elected to Delta Chapter of Al¬ 
pha Omega Alpha, national medical 
honor society. Dr. Burns is married 
to Dr. Herbert Goldberg, a neuro¬ 
radiologist. The Goldbergs and their 
two children live at Park Towne 
Place, Philadelphia. 


1957 

HAROLD J. FALLON, JR. and JO¬ 
SEPH S. PAGANO have been se¬ 
lected by the National Institutes of 
Health for Research Career Develop¬ 
ment Awards. Dr. Fallon joined the 
faculty of the University of North 
Carolina School of Medicine in 1963 
and is associate professor of medi¬ 
cine and bacteriology. Dr. Pagano 
came to Chapel Hill in 1965 and is 
also associate professor of medicine 
and bacteriology. 

1959 

MALCOLM R. ING has recently 
opened an office in Hawaii for the 
practice of ophthalmology. His ad¬ 
dress is Ala Moana Building, 1441 
Kapiolani Boulevard, Honolulu, Ha¬ 
waii 96814. 

1961 

ALBERT A. BECHTOLDT, JR., who 
was an instructor in anesthesiology 
at the University of North Carolina 
School of Medicine before complet¬ 
ing his military service, has now re¬ 
turned to that school. He served as 
an anesthesiologist with the U.S. Ar¬ 
my Medical Corps in the two-year 
interim. 

1963 

WILLIAM T. FRIEDEWALD, dinner 
chairman, reported on the class’s re¬ 
union: “The five year reunion of our 
class was amazingly pleasant. The 
luncheon and cocktail party at famil¬ 
iar Edw. S. Harkness Hall were en¬ 
joyable, and the private dinner at the 
Weather Vane Restaurant was a 
great success. 

“In attendance were DUDLEY 
DANOFF, in a maroon XKE up from 
Columbia and a urology residency; 
ANDREW EDIN, from Minneapolis, 
the greatest distance traveled, soon 
to be a chief resident in medicine 
and then into practice; WILLIAM 
FRIEDEWALD, completing a medi¬ 
cal residency at Yale and then to 
Stanford for a year of biostatistics 
before returning to N.I.H.; DAVE 
FULMER, up from his medical prac¬ 
tice in Princeton, New Jersey; AL¬ 
EXANDER GAUDIO, continuing his 
ophthalmology residency in Boston; 
GEORGE HOLSTEN, in the midst of 
a pathology residency at the West 
Haven V.A. Hospital; HAROLD 
KAPLAN, completing a medical res¬ 
idency at Yale and then to remain as 



a G.I. fellow; CRAIG LLEWELLYN, 
completing a Master of Public Health 
in Boston while in the Service; JOHN 
MAHONEY, completing a psychiatry 
residency at Yale; SHELDON PIN- 
NELL, up from N.I.H. and about to 
begin a dermatology residency in 
Boston; JAY POMERANTZ and 
ROBERT SHAPIRO, both continuing 
a psychiatry residency in Boston; 
LEE TALNER, finishing a radiology 
residency at Yale, about to depart to 
England for a year; and JEROME 
WINER, continuing his psychiatry 
residency. All look forward to the 
tenth!’’ 

1964 

JOSEPH F. J. CURI and his wife, 
Susannah, have announced the birth 
of their second daughter on August 
14. Dr. Curi is now chief of pediat¬ 
rics at Vandenberg Air Force Base in 
California. He expects to begin a fel¬ 
lowship in adolescent medicine at 
the Children's Hospital Medical Cen¬ 
ter in Boston next year. 

1965 

PHYLLIS HURWITZ worked for two 
months last spring at the Rogoff Re¬ 
search Institute, Beilinson Hospital, 
Petah-Tikua, Israel, on a project con¬ 
cerning phospholipase and hemoly¬ 
sis. She has recently begun work at 
Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City 
with the aid of a fellowship in hema¬ 
tology. 

1966 

From DAVID C. LAW: “I am contin¬ 
uing my residency training in medi¬ 
cine as a senior assistant resident on 
the Georgetown Service at D.C. Gen¬ 
eral Hospital; the experience has 
been superb. I would be most happy 
to speak with any prospective intern 
candidate from Yale who comes to 
D.C. General.” 

ELI H. NEWBERGER, Peace Corps 
physician, writes from Upper Volta, 
Africa: “I represented the Peace 
Corps at the WHO/AID-sponsored 
conference on river blindness con¬ 
trol in Tunis during the first week of 
July and expect to leave tomorrow 
for a regional West African meeting 
of the Health Ministers of the En¬ 
tente Counsel States—Ivory Coast, 
Upper Volta, Togo, Dahomey, and 
Niger—where the technical and ad¬ 
ministrative means for combatting 
the principal endemic infectious ill- 


32 






nesses will be discussed. I would 
gladly describe in detail the rich ex¬ 
perience of practicing medicine in 
Ouagadougou, supporting the Volun¬ 
teers' work in health and participat¬ 
ing in the planning for onchocerci¬ 
asis and tuberculosis control . . 

1967 

GARY BURGET is presently a resi¬ 
dent in the new Columbia University 
surgical program at Harlem Hospital. 
He reports that he is on call every 
other night and when on call, oper¬ 
ates all night. 

STEPHEN W. MILLER, formerly of 
Lancaster, Ohio, has been appointed 
to the commissioned corps of the 
U.S. Public Health Service. He has 
been assigned to the heart disease 
and stroke control program at the 
Applied Physiology Laboratory in 
Washington, D.C. He will be active 
in administering and evaluating vari¬ 
ous exercise stress testing methods 
and associated heart measurements 
to determine those best suited for 
mass screening procedures. Dr. 
Miller served his internship at the 
New England Medical Center in 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

PUBLIC HEALTH 
1939 

BEN D. KININGHAM is chairman of 
the promotion sub-committee of the 
Illinois Citizen’s Committee. He is 
concentrating his efforts on getting 
out the vote on a billion dollar bond 
issue for air and water pollution 
control. 

1942 

CLAIRE BURTON REINHARDT has 
been appointed an associate consul¬ 
tant in health occupations education, 
Connecticut State Department of 
Education. She was formerly public 
health program coordinator in the 
State Department of Health. Dr. 
Reinhardt will work with local, re¬ 
gional, and state groups to develop 
new programs and improve existing 
programs of health education. A 
focal point of her activities will be 
the development of health courses 
in community colleges and secon¬ 
dary schools. 

1946 

NICHOLAS W. FENNEY was re¬ 
elected this spring as secretary of the 
interprofessional relations commit¬ 


tee of the Connecticut State Medical 
Society-Connecticut Pharmaceutical 
Association. 

1947 

JOANN STEINER LEWIS has moved 
from Hastings, Nebraska, to New 
Wilmington, Pennsylvania. Her hus¬ 
band, Dr. Philip A. Lewis, was re¬ 
cently appointed dean of the College 
of Westminster and professor of 
chemistry. 

1949 

HILDA H. KROEGER has been ap¬ 
pointed professor and head, Medical 
ajid Hospital Administration Divi¬ 
sion, Graduate School of Public 
Health, University of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

1952 

RALPH T. PALMER is active in re¬ 
cruiting missionaries to serve over¬ 
seas. The several cooperating mis¬ 
sion boards have need for physi¬ 
cians, nurses, public health officers, 
and other medical personnel. He par¬ 
ticularly cited the need for a radiolo¬ 
gist for Central India when he wrote 
in May. His address is: United Chris¬ 
tian Missionary Society, 222 S. Dow¬ 
ney Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana 
46207. 

1953 

HORACE A. BROWN of Simsbury, 
Connecticut, was named American 
Heart Association regional director 
for the New England area. Previ¬ 
ously, he was a general consultant 
for the New England Heart Associa¬ 
tions of the American Heart Asso¬ 
ciation. 

GRACE T. JANSEN switched from 
public health to curative medicine. 
She writes that she could not attend 
the Alumni Day program because 
she is currently a board-certified an¬ 
esthesiologist in Anchorage, Alaska. 

1954 

ELIZABETH CORNFIELD is the di¬ 
rector of public health for the city of 
Bristol, Connecticut. 

MILTON W. HAMILT, formerly of 
Evanston, Illinois, has been ap¬ 
pointed executive vice-president of 
Lenox Hill Hospital in New York 
City. 

ELISA H. W. WYNMALEN is on the 
staff of the Institute of Social Medi¬ 
cine, University of Leiden in the 
Netherlands. 


1955 

NGUYEN VAN THO was appointed 
Minister of Culture, Education and 
Youth for the Republic of Vietnam. 
This is his third appointment to this 
post. In 1967 his wife was elected a 
member of the Senate of the Repub¬ 
lic of Vietnam. In this connection, 
she made a good will tour of the 
United States this spring and was a 
guest of the Senate. 

1958 

WILLIAM H. KEELER, formerly 
Commissioner of Health of Roanoke, 
Virginia, has been appointed re¬ 
gional health officer for the North¬ 
western Region of Illinois. His head¬ 
quarters will be in Aurora. 



NGUYEN TUAN PHONG happened 
to be in Washington on business in 
early June and was granted permis¬ 
sion to attend reunion proceedings 
here. After getting his M.P.H. in New 
Haven, he received his M.D. degree 
in Vietnam and is now the head of 
training for health personnel in 
South Vietnam. 

1960 

KATHARINE A. KEPPEL is a mem¬ 
ber of the faculty of the School of 
Nursing at the University of San 
Francisco. Miss Keppel instructs in 
the field of public health nursing. 

1961 

Major GORDON R. BEEM is now as¬ 
signed to the Air Force Surgeon Gen¬ 
eral’s Office as a staff plans officer. 
His wife and family, after 2 V 2 years 
in northern Maine, are enjoying life 
in the District of Columbia. 

1965 

YONG C. KIM has been appointed 
research associate for the Canadian 


33 


Association for Retarded Children. 
He has moved from Regina, Sas¬ 
katchewan to Ontario. In his new 
post, Mr. Kim will be responsible for 
the evaluation of national programs 
for mentally retarded children and 
will serve as consultant to various 
research programs dealing with men¬ 
tally retarded children. 

TAKEO NAKAJIMA has been as¬ 
signed to the Japanese Embassy in 
the United States as the Atomic 
Energy Attache and represents the 
Japanese Atomic Energy Commis¬ 
sion. He and his wife will be living 
in Washington, D.C. for the next four 
years. 

1967 

DENNIS MAGID of Burlingame, Cal¬ 
ifornia, presented his thesis at the 
Third Joint Meeting of Commis¬ 
sioned Officers Association and the 
Clinical Society of the Public Health 
Service, held in San Francisco this 
spring. 

HOUSE STAFF 
1924 

SAMUEL A. ANDERSON, JR. sent 
along a brief synopsis of his activi¬ 
ties since leaving Yale. It included a 
period at Boston Children’s Hospital, 
18 months at St. Louis Children’s 
Hospital, and three months as chief 
resident in pediatrics at Philadelphia 
Children’s Hospital. The succeeding 
years were devoted to the practice of 
pediatrics and a little teaching at the 
University of Vermont College of 
Medicine. He is now in retirement in 
Richmond, Virginia, and spends win¬ 
ters in Captiva, Florida. 

1928 

FREDERICK T. SCHNATZ is a clin¬ 
ical professor of medicine at the 
State University of New York in 
Buffalo. On his retirement, which is 
mandatory in IV 2 years, he plans to 
go into private practice. 

1942 

ARTHUR L. CHANDLER is now 
psychiatric director of the Psychi¬ 
atric Research Institute of Beverly 
Hills, California. 

1943 

EARL J. SIMBURG has been elected 
secretary to the San Francisco Psy¬ 
choanalytic Society and Institute 
and also to the council of the North¬ 


ern California Psychiatric Society. 
He has likewise received an appoint¬ 
ment to the Mental Health Commit¬ 
tee of the California Medical Asso¬ 
ciation. His address is 86 Tamalpais 
Road, Berkeley, California 94708. 

1945 

CHARLES M. PLOTZ is professor of 
medicine and director of continuing 
education at the State University of 
New York, Downstate Medical Cen¬ 
ter in Brooklyn. 

1946 

JOHN P. McGOVERN of Houston, 
Texas, was installed as president of 
the American College of Allergists 
at their spring meeting in Denver. 


Dr. McGovern 

1949 

ARNOLD S. RELMAN, who has 
been professor of medicine at Boston 
University School of Medicine, has 
assumed the post of chairman at the 
University of Pennsylvania School 
of Medicine. He is known for his ex¬ 
tensive work on the mechanisms 
which regulate acid-base balance in 
body fluids. 

1954 

DAVID HUBBELL of St. Petersburg, 
is president of the American Cancer 
Society, Florida Division. 

RUTH KERR JAKOBY writes that, 
in addition to her private practice in 
neurosurgery in the Maryland sub¬ 
urbs adjacent to Washington, she 
has an appointment as assistant clin¬ 
ical professor of neurosurgery at 
George Washington University. 

1956 

RICHARD T. CUSHING, who was a 
member of the house staff from 
1953-1956, has since received an 


M.S. degree in internal medicine 
from the University of Michigan and 
was certified last year in the field of 
pediatric allergy. His address is 4959 
Excelsior Boulevard, Minneapolis, 
Minnesota. 

1959 

AMILCAR VIANNA, his wife and 
their three children cheerfully ex¬ 
tend an invitation to Yale friends to 
visit with them in Rio de Janiero, 
Brazil, where he is an assistant pro¬ 
fessor of dentistry at the Dental 
School. 

1961 

PRESTON H. BRADSHAW has been 
in the private practice of urology for 
the past year. His address in 929 
North Brook Drive, Raleigh, North 
Carolina. 

1962 

M. MICHAEL EISENBERG is now 
professor of surgery at the Univer¬ 
sity of Minnesota and chief of sur¬ 
gery at Mt. Sinai Hospital in Min¬ 
neapolis. 

1963 

JULIAN H. CAPPS has recently 
moved to Chapel Hill and is assistant 
professor of radiology at the Univer¬ 
sity of North Carolina School of 
Medicine. 

1964 

DONALD GRAYSON, who interned 
at Yale-New Haven Hospital in 
1963-64, is presently a lieutenant 
commander attached to the Phila¬ 
delphia Naval Hospital as staff psy¬ 
chiatrist. 

JOHN W. KREIDER has been pro¬ 
moted to assistant professor of path¬ 
ology at The Milton S. Hershey Med¬ 
ical Center of the Pennsylvania State 
University. 


Dr. Kreider 




34 







ROBERT H. PETER, after two years 
in the Navy as lieutenant com¬ 
mander at the Cardiac Catheter Lab¬ 
oratory of the Portsmouth Naval 
Hospital in Virginia, is now an asso¬ 
ciate in medicine at Duke University 
Medical Center in the division of 
cardiology. 

1966 

ANTHONY MINNEFOR has left the 
United States Air Force to begin a 
fellowship in infectious diseases at 
the Department of Pediatrics at 
Johns Hopkins. 

GORDON K. PHILLIPS is practicing 
with the Great Falls Clinic in Great 
Falls, Montana. 

1967 

LEONARD GOLD has an appoint¬ 
ment as clinical anesthesiologist at 
Atlantic City Hospital in New Jersey. 
JEAN-E. MORIN was appointed lec¬ 
turer in surgery, McGill University 
and assistant surgeon at the Royal 
Victoria Hospital a few months ago. 


Picture Credits Robert Perron: cover, pp. 2 , 
15, 16, 18, 19: Prescott Clement: pp. 6, 7, 33: Yale 
University Art Gallery: p. 8; A. Burton Street: 
p. 20; Charles Alburtus, Yale News Bureau: pp. 
21, 22, 24, 27; Ann M. Martens: p. 24 upper; Ned 
Thomas: p. 24 lower; Jay Storm: p. 25; New 
Haven Register: p. 28; Dan Bernstein: p. 30 















REMINDER 


If you have moved recently and have not 
yet sent us your new address, 
please do so now. Thank you. 


YALE MEDICINE 


333 Cedar Street 


NON-PROFIT ORG. 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

New Haven, Conn. 
Permit No. 8 


New Haven, Conn. 06510 













YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE / WINTER 1969 



maximum load 

ALLOWED OVER 
THIS BRIDGE 
10 TONS 


munc 


7 

































COVER 


The Hill, an inner-city neighborhood adjacent to the Yale-New Haven 
Medical Center, is the home of approximately 25,000 people, most of 
whom are poor. The relationship of the School of Medicine to the 
community is discussed in several articles in this issue. 



YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE / WINTER 1969 / VOL. 4 NO. 1 


Contents 

The Community-University Interface by Adrian M. Ostfeld, M.D. 3 


Expanding Community Service 5 

To Bridge the Generation Gap by Lawrence Horowitz 7 

AIIvI Campaign 12 

Anatomist and Cancer Biologist 14 

Peter Parker and the Canton Ophthalmic Hospital 19 

by Oscar Wand, M.D. 

In and About Sterling Hall 23 

Ob/Gyn Alumni Gather 32 

Alumni News 33 


YALE MEDICINE is published three times a year — in the fall, winter, and 
spring — and is distributed to members of the Association of Yale Alumni in 
Medicine, students, and others interested in the School of Medicine. Com¬ 
munications may be addressed to The Editor, Room L200, 333 Cedar Street, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 06510. 


Editor Arthur Ebbert, Jr., M.D. 

Managing Editor Kate Swift 
Assistant Managing Editor Anne S. Bittker 
Designer Sarah P. Sullivan 
Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 
Benjamin Castleman, M.D., '31, President 
George A. Carden, II, M.D., '35, Vice-President 
Robert F. Bradley, Jr., M.D., '43, Secretary 
Lawrence K. Pickett, M.D., '44, Past President 

Executive Committee 
Philip S. Brezina, M.D., '40 
William B. Kiesewetter, M.D., ’49hs 
Eric W. Mood ’43mph 
Richard D. Otis, M.D., '49 
Michael A. Puzak, M.D., '42 
Richmond W. Smith, Jr., M.D., '42 






The Hill Health Education Council, organized by students in the School 
of Public Health, sponsors weekly meetings at which the lecturers and 
panelists are community leaders and residents, landlords, politicians, 
municipal employees, and others, in addition to Yale faculty members. 
The purpose of the council is to bring to public health students the 
viewpoint of the consumer of health services. 



2 


















The Community-University Interface 


by Adrian M. Ostfeld, M.D. 


I n this article I am a spokesman only for myself. And 
I claim no originality. What is set down here I have 
! learned from black leaders, students, faculty members, 
and ghetto dwellers. 

There are great pressures on universities for change 
— especially change in professional education. These 
pressures originate in the black ghettos and in the white 
children of affluence. 

For some, a part of the American dream has always 
been that any white man is better than any black man. 
The consequences of this implicit but powerful belief 
led first to slavery, then to the existence of a black 
peasant class trapped in rural poverty and more re¬ 
cently in urban isolation. Ghetto living and poverty 
have done many things to the black man. The evil 
things need no repetition here. But the circumstances 
of their lives have also had effects that uniquely equip 
black people to understand and heal the social, educa¬ 
tional, and moral illnesses of our country. For example, 
it is impossible to hide misfortune or mischief in the 
ghetto. One becomes ruthlessly honest. Frozen out of 
an adequate education and kept away from science and 
technology, one comes to emphasize human values, 
righteous conduct, and concern with the quality of life. 
There develops an insistence on human needs rather 
than the needs of institutions or disciplines, and a deter¬ 
mination that science must serve the humane needs of 
society rather than any master who can pay for its 
services. 

The life experience of the new generation of white 
students has been the opposite of American blacks. 
Their material needs have been generously met and 
their post-Sputnik education has been vastly improved 
over that of their parents. They have learned a great 
deal about the very science and technology that has 
been kept from the Negro. And yet many of today’s 
students have come to share with the black man his 
beliefs that human needs must transcend those of or- 



Dr. Ostfeld is Anna M. R. 
Lauder Professor and chair¬ 
man of the Department 
of Epidemiology and 
Public Health. 


ganizations and institutions and that science must serve 
the humane needs of society. It is of crucial importance 
that these two groups, the affluent, well-educated white 
student and the poor, educationally deprived Negro, 
are both saying the same thing about education and sci¬ 
ence — that both must serve the needs of people, both 
must improve the quality of life, and both must serve 
to heal the grievous social ills of our country. 

I now become specific in this exposition. I believe 
that what the modern student and the black leadership 
are telling us is that they want the traditional profes¬ 
sional curriculum replaced by a new, three-layered cur¬ 
riculum. Although the content of these three layers 
must be separated for purposes of discussion, it is not 
necessary that the second layer begin only after the 
first has been completed. Initially the students want a 
learning experience of as brief duration as possible that 
will provide them with the basic elements of the pro¬ 
fession. This means methods, concepts, vocabulary, the 
development of relevant skills, and the facility to think 
critically. The second layer is characterized by the 
project-oriented approach. Here the student, singly or 
in groups, learns to identify and describe a problem 
and to prepare recommendations for its solution. In the 
first two layers, students and faculty maintain their 
traditional roles, and the techniques of instruction are 
the usual ones. Virtually every kind of professional 
education recognizes and provides these layers. 

The contemporary student and black leadership, 
however, insist on a third layer. They want to take part 
in solving the problem they have described. The solu¬ 
tion may require social action, exerting pressure in the 
public or private sector, or working with community 
organizations that are trying to change laws, institu¬ 
tions, or attitudes. In the third layer the student and 
faculty roles change. The students organize into groups, 
leave the classroom, and go where the problem is. The 
faculty now become resource persons whom the stu¬ 
dents seek out as they see fit. But a new definition of 
faculty is needed. The kind of teacher who can help 
the students to solve problems in the community is 
usually not the kind who can help student learning in 
the first two layers. Those who can help the student in 
solving community problems may be tenants, welfare 
recipients, police, leaders of racial and ethnic organiza¬ 
tions, or political figures. These are the new faculty be¬ 
cause they have the knowledge the student needs in the 
third layer. 

If one believes, as I do, that black organizations and 
the new student are correct about contemporary educa¬ 
tion and society, one can advocate at least three efforts. 


3 




First, we need more — many more-—black students 
and black faculty, not to redress grievances, but be¬ 
cause it is in the best interest of our universities to 
have them. Their life experience has given them an 
understanding of our country and its problems that 
uniquely enables them, first as students and later as 
faculty, to reshape the methods and goals of education 
and of our country. Second, we must move as quickly 
as possible to the concept of the three-layered curri¬ 
culum. Models of this sort are already in action at Yale 
and elsewhere. In one model, a group of faculty mem¬ 
bers makes known to a community that it is interested 
in working on the community’s problems at the latter’s 
invitation. The community may be a hospital, a housing 
project, an organization, a city, or even a state, and it 
may be many other things as well. The community 
brings problems to the faculty members. The latter se¬ 
lect those whose needs they are most qualified to help 
meet and whose investigation and solution will provide 
the best learning experience for their students. The stu¬ 
dents then go into the community and work with its 
representatives to identify and characterize problems 
utilizing their own basic education, their humanness, 
and faculty resources. They then propose solutions and 
work with the community and with their faculty mem¬ 
bers to implement the solutions. An additional but 
similar educational model has also developed. Students 
and faculty, interested in improving their educational 
experience and in community service, organize and 
make their purpose known to a community. The com¬ 
munity invites the group to examine certain problems 
and propose solutions. The student-faculty group char¬ 
acterizes the community problem and then proposes 
solutions. They work with the community leaders to 
solve the problem. The solution may require new funds, 
social action, political confrontation, legislation, or edu¬ 
cation. 

Third, we need a new kind of setting for education 
in the health professions. One of the glories of America 
is its agriculture. This is so because American higher 
education made available to the American farmer the 
methods of science and the minds of its faculty and stu¬ 
dents. I believe that professional schools have the same 
kind of obligations to the American student and de¬ 
liverer of health services as the agricultural colleges do 
to the American farmer. But we have no setting in 
which to do the research, the teaching, and the con¬ 
sultative service required by such a relationship. The 
agricultural colleges had the model farm. The health 
professions require a new kind of institution, one that 
will supplement the teaching hospital. The new structure 


is gradually being articulated at Yale. It will consist o 
several out-patient settings offering continuous, com 
prehensive care to well-defined groups of people. Bu 
health needs cannot be separated from social, economic 
and educational needs. Eventually, to meet the needs o 
people and of the health-professions colleges, setting: 
will be required in which the health, social, economic 
and educational needs of people can all be servec 
under the same roof. The health-professions schools ir. 
such settings will have opportunities for research, foi 
teaching, and for service hardly dreamed of at present. 

The model farms of the agricultural colleges did not 
raise crops for market. They utilized only enough space ' 
to act as consultants for their consumers and for their 
own research and teaching requirements. The equiva¬ 
lent is all that is necessary for health-professions 
schools. 

I close with an expression of caution. From 1945 to 
1965 it was widely believed in American society that! 
the scientist working in his own laboratory, at his own 
pace, and on problems of his own choice would solve 
the health needs of American society. We know now 
that this is not so, and we are at the beginning of a | 
period of pragmatism, relevance, and service. However, 
there will come a time in fifteen or twenty years when ' 
it will become apparent that service, community action, | 
and laws are also unable to solve all of our health prob- j 
lems. More basic knowledge will be essential. The cry 
will then be "back to the laboratory.” An institution 
that allows its laboratories to atrophy and its basic sci¬ 
entists to languish will be in sad shape indeed when the 
new cycle begins. 


4 









Expanding Community Health Care 





A primary challenge to medical schools in 1969 is to 
find and teach better ways of delivering health care. 
Yale, because of its unique position as an integral part of 
a great, urban university at the hub of regional health 
care services, has both a vast responsibility and an un¬ 
limited opportunity. 

As the year begins, this medical school is involved in 
a number of innovative programs of community health 
care. In each case Yale is a participant with others in 
attempting to treat the problem of health care delivery 
in terms of its etiology rather than its symptoms. The 
school's particular role is to study and demonstrate for 
teaching purposes effective methods of delivering the 
best possible health services, rather than to assume re¬ 
sponsibility for the continuing operation of these ser¬ 
vices. 

The Hill Health Center, which begins operation this 
winter, is planned to provide comprehensive health care, 
including preventive services, to the 8,000 people under 
the age of 21 who live in the Hill neighborhood of New 
Haven. Supported by funds from the federal government 
and other sources, the center operates under the direc¬ 
tion of the school's Department of Pediatrics, with guid¬ 
ance from a board of citizens that includes residents of 
the Hill and members of health professions. The center 
is entirely community-based, occupying a building in the 
neighborhood it serves and employing and training 
neighborhood residents in health care jobs. It is antici¬ 
pated that direction of the program will eventually be 
transferred to a board representing the Hill residents. 

A program of community mental health care in which 
the Department of Psychiatry is engaged has been in op¬ 
eration for the past two and a half years. The Hill-West 
Haven Division of the Connecticut Mental Health Center 
provides comprehensive mental health care to the resi¬ 
dents of the Hill and the community of West Haven. 
Established services include outpatient, day hospital, 
and emergency inpatient treatment facilities, as well as 
the prevention of mental illness through planned pro¬ 
grams, identification of mental illness in its early stages, 
and rehabilitation of the mentally ill. The division’s ser¬ 
vices in the Hill are being coordinated with those of the 
Hill Health Center in order to provide residents with sys¬ 
tematic and sustained health care. 

Two other programs in the formative stages are de¬ 
signed to provide prepaid comprehensive health services 
through group practice to specific populations of New 
Haven. A Yale University health plan will serve not only 
students but will also be offered, on a voluntary basis, to 
University faculty members and employees and their 
families, as well as to the dependents of students and 


The first ciass of community health workers trained at the Hill Health 
Center graduated in December. The Reverend Daniei Collins, a member 
of the Hill Health Council, presented certificates to the six new 
health workers. 


lj . d - l wjammmn -n 1 


Staff members of the Hill-West Haven Division of the Connecticut 
Mental Health Center meet with the chief of the division’s field station 
in the Hill, Dr. Carl Mindeil, assistant professor of psychiatry. 

The Baidwin-King Schools Project, aimed at improving inner-city- 
education, is directed by Dr. fames P. Comer, assistant professor of 
psychiatry in the Yale Child Study Center. Here, he and the mother of a 
pupil talk with a teacher at the Baldwin School. 


5 





graduate students — a potential total membership of 
approximately 30,000. A similar plan, initiated by the 
Greater New Haven Central Labor Council, will be made 
available to members of labor unions and other groups, 
and their families. Professional and technical studies for 
the design of this plan have been conducted by the De¬ 
partment of Epidemiology and Public Health. Although 
not operated by the medical school, both of these group 
plans will provide settings for continuing studies of the 
delivery of health care and for the training of health per¬ 
sonnel. 

The application of advanced knowledge in the field of 
child development is combined with meaningful com¬ 
munity service in the programs of the Yale Child Study 
Center. 

The Baldwin-King Schools Project, being conducted in 
cooperation with the New Haven school system under a 
Ford Foundation grant, is designed to bring the knowl¬ 
edge of individual and group dynamics to bear on the 
problems of inner city education. Its primary objective is 
the achievement of quality education through improving 


communication and cooperation among parents, teach- 1 
ers, and children and by providing the support of master 
teachers, curriculum specialists, school social workers, i 
and psychologists for classroom teachers. 

The Child Welfare Demonstration Research Program, 
which is partly supported by federal funds, seeks to find I 
ways of protecting underprivileged children from the i 
damaging effects of their environments. The program is 
presently based in a day care facility named Children's 
House on Davenport Avenue. When additional space be¬ 
comes available, the program will be expanded to in¬ 
clude children without families for whom complete care I 
will be provided. 

Through these programs and others — all in the early ! 
stages of development — the School of Medicine is at- ! 
tempting to resolve, with the people of New Haven, the 
most critical issue facing medicine today: how to place | 1 
the fruits of medical research at the service of all the 
people. The task is enormous, but a beginning has been 
made. 



Above left: At Children's House, staff members 
confer about experiences with the children. Dr. 
Sally Provence, professor of pediatrics and head 
of the Child Development Unit of the Child 
Study Center, directs the program. Above: one 
youngster at Chi/dren's House looks forward 
eager/y to accompanying staff member fohn H 
Atkins op business errands each day. 


6 









































To Bridge The Generation Gap 


by Lawrence Horowitz, ’69 


F or the past few years the Yale School of Medicine has 
found itself a victim of the dread generation gap. At¬ 
tendance at lectures decreased as the number of electron 
micrographs increased, and many students turned off the 
biochemical pathways and charted their own academic 
course through the first two years. The faculty, sensing 
that something was very wrong, made an attempt to 
bridge the gap with the new curriculum, which incorpo¬ 
rated ways of meeting certain student objections to the 
old one, but did not have active student participation at 
all levels of its development. In this era of “Student 
Power,’’ that was a potentially serious mistake. But hap¬ 
pily the curriculum was sufficiently flexible and appar¬ 
ently open to enough individual interpretations to he 
viewed by many of us as a first step in what could be¬ 
come an important faculty-student attempt to bridge the 
generation gap jointly. It is toward furthering that dia¬ 
logue that the rest of this article is aimed. 

I 

“The health of the people is a public concern; ill health 
is a major cause of suffering, economic loss and depen¬ 
dency; good health is essential to the security and prog¬ 
ress of the nation. . . . 

“I have been concerned by the evidence ... of serious 
inequalities of resources, medical facilities and services 
in different sections and among different economic 
groups. These inequalities create handicaps for the parts 
of our country and the groups of the people which most 
sorely need the benefits of modern medical science.’’ 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
Message to Congress 
January 23,1939 

It is nearly thirty years since F.D.R. included the right to 
good medical care in his Economic Bill of Rights. And 
yet in 1968 farm workers in Riverhead, Long Island, were 
receiving little if any medical care; pediatricians in New 
London, Connecticut, had to be pushed to screen lead 
levels in ghetto children (they were apparently ignorant 
of the fact that the State of Connecticut performs the lab 
work free); and in New Haven, on several occasions dur¬ 
ing the summer, neighborhood groups prepared to storm 
the Emergency Room at the Yale-New Haven Hospital 
to protest the treatment there. 

The founders of the Yale Student Health Project felt 
that not enough attention was being given to community 
medicine at this medical center and that, in fact, the 
science of developing health care delivery systems, and 
study of the responsibility of a medical center to the 
community it serves and the responsibility of the medi¬ 


cal profession to the society it serves, were being totally 
neglected in the training of physicians at Yale. Nor 
was this feeling unique to Yale students; the areas of 
neglect were shared by every major medical center in 
the country. 

In 1965, thirteen students from various schools of law, 
medicine, and dentistry decided to broaden their own 
individual experience by spending a summer working on 
the health problems of migrant workers in the San 
Joaquin Valley in California. As a result of that summer’s 
experience, ninety students of medicine, nursing, den¬ 
tistry, dental hygiene, and social work from forty institu¬ 
tions in eleven states served the next summer in various 
capacities in poverty areas across the State of California, 
and the first Student Health Project had come into be¬ 
ing. Each student consulted with a preceptor who was 
involved in some way with health concerns and disad¬ 
vantaged populations. The program was sponsored 
through a demonstration grant from the Office of Eco¬ 
nomic Opportunity, which hailed this maiden effort 
as a great success. In its evaluation, OEO cited four 
distinctive aspects of the program: 

1. The project was student-conceived. 

2. The project demonstrated the effectiveness of the 
multi-discipline approach to health problems. 

3. The large degree of autonomy given the students 
paid off in the unique resourcefulness and creativity 
they brought to bear in solving problems often con¬ 
sidered hopeless by traditional agencies. 

4. Two important lessons were learned through the use 
of community workers and indigenous community 
organization. The first was that only when members 
of the community participated at all levels of the 
program’s development was an effective community 
health program achieved. Whenever “benevolent 
benefactors” attempted to do what was right for 
the community without asking for community partic- 



Mr. Horowitz is director of 
the Yale Student Health 
Project. An alumnus of Union 
College, he worked in the 
California Student Health 
Project in the summer of 1967. 


7 


ipation, the result was a dismal failure. The second 
lesson was that students were uniquely effective as 
agents of the people, being able to bridge the in¬ 
credibly great distance that had previously existed 
between the medical establishment and the commun¬ 
ities it was trying to serve. For the first time profes¬ 
sionals and community leaders were talking and 
working together. 

The next year, 1967, saw 250 health science students 
participate in health projects in Chicago, California, 
and New York. Last summer projects were organized 
in eight states, and over 500 health science students 
were exposed to an area of medicine not listed in their 
school curriculums. 

II 

The Student Health Project at Yale is now nine months 
old. In those months it has received praise from high 
government officials, many Yale professors, many local 
community residents in the three areas of project in¬ 
volvement, and even from some local officials. In those 
months it has been damned and threatened by high 
government officials, some Yale business office per¬ 
sonnel, several local community residents, and by many 
local officials. It has been accused of sponsoring a 
“drunken sexual orgy’’ at its mid-summer convocation 
and been congratulated on “the responsible organiza¬ 


tion’’ of the mid-summer convocation. It has been ac¬ 
cused of “ruining the name of the medical school by its 
irresponsible activities’’ and been called “the single 
most important thing that has happened to medical 
education at Yale in the last ten years.’’ It has been 
exciting and frustrating for those who have participated 
in it, and it has done some good and some harm. The 
specifics of its accomplishments and failures will be 
detailed by the special evaluation committee, headed 
by Dr. Raymond Duff of the Yale faculty. It is one of 
the first, if not the first, student health project to sub¬ 
mit to rigorous, impartial evaluation. No matter what 
the final accounting of the project may be, it is fair to 
say that many important things were learned. 

The first and most obvious thing, and one of the 
hardest to learn, was that the methods of approach 
used in one area are simply not applicable to another. 
The project was based in New Haven, New London, 
and Riverhead, Long Island. The sophistication of the 
local organizations in New Haven meant that the stu¬ 
dents were to function more in a service than an or¬ 
ganizing role. In New Haven they were to perform 
whatever services were requested by the groups with 
which they were placed, and the wisdom of the task 
was not in the students’ realm of concern. The paradox 
was that since the students were not trained or legally 
able to act as physicians, many ended up doing things 
that took no account of their educational goals. Yet it 


Workers in (he three summer programs of the Student Health Project gathered for a midsummer 
convocation to review and assess their operations. Dr. Raymond S. Duff, associate professor 
of pediatrics, is chairman of the committee assigned to make a thorough evaluation of the 
project. 


Tackling problems of funding. Mrs. Brenda /ones 
the president of "Operation Child Care," meets 
with consultants, including Nancy Koehne, one 
of three graduate students at the Yale School of 
Nursing who assisted the mothers in organizing 
and establishing the child care program 



8 








Migrant farm workers, on whose behalf students worked at Riverhead. 
Long Island, lived in quarters provided by growers. 


was through doing basic tasks that they learned what 
the basic needs of the communities were. Health is 
very low on the ghetto resident’s list of priorities. 
Housing, food, a camp for the children in the summer, 
painted walls — these were high. Getting to a doctor 
was a critical problem in the Fair Haven section, and a 
small number of students acted as chauffeurs — a blow 
to their egos perhaps, but an incredibly valuable service 
to the community. Other students in New Haven did 
have more “medical" tasks to do. Several took all the 
histories for the Hill Child Health Center. Three grad¬ 
uate students in nursing helped a group of mothers in 
the Hill organize themselves to work for the establish¬ 
ment of a day care center for their children. This proj¬ 
ect is still continuing and is called “Operation Child 
Care.” 

On Long Island, things were very different. There 
were no effective community groups, and the students 
found themselves acting as community organizers. By 


the end of the summer they had, with donations from a 
drug company, laid the foundations for a mobile clinic 
for the migrant workers. They conducted health edu¬ 
cation courses in North Bellport. They encountered 
three slums with housing as bad as any in the south: 
wooden shacks built in trenches below ground level so 
that after a storm the rain water drained down into the 
homes. These houses were obviously a very dangerous 
health hazard and the students began an intensive 
housing drive in the three areas, a drive that is being 
continued today by the community workers who la¬ 
bored with the students during the summer. Sixty 
health science students from across the country and 
fifty community workers from the areas involved took 
part in the project. All were paid the same wages. 

New London presented a third type of community, 
one with fledgling indigenous community groups. The 
job of the students was to work with and for the 
groups, encouraging them to take the lead, yet playing 


9 






a more active role than the students in New Haven. 

The second thing we learned, and this was the hard¬ 
est to accept, was that the problems of the communities 
are so complex, their roots so deep, that barely a dent 
is made in the course of a ten-week project. Every 
student in the project felt the frustration of tackling a 
problem with all the energy he had and finding it re¬ 
sistant to solution. Many of the students had never had 
this experience before. They began to get a feel for 
the amount of energy that will be needed to overcome 
these problems, and many went through a period of 
despair during the summer and wondered aloud about 
a system that permits knots to be tied so tightly that 
many have felt it necessary to burn the rope rather 
than spend the tedious effort to untie it. Yet if the stu¬ 
dents were so exasperated after just ten weeks, how 
must it feel to live under such intractable conditions 
for years? When the students listened to members of 
the black community talk about the Yale-New Haven 
Hospital, they felt that the medical community could 
not possibly understand the depth of feeling against it. 

What else could possibly account for seeming indiffer¬ 
ence at a time that called for emergency attention and 
programs? The students learned that one harsh word 
from an embattled house officer in the Emergency 
Room could do damage that took days to repair and 
was never really repaired. One of the questions many 
of the students struggled with was how to define the 
responsibilities a medical center has to the community 
it purports to serve. If the sole objective of the medical 
school is education, where is the comprehensive care 
of the ghetto citizen to come from? If that care is not 
the medical center’s primary concern, whose primary 
concern will it be? Why is the development of an effec¬ 
tive and comprehensive health care delivery system 
for an area that desperately needs it not as important 
and deserving of full and unqualified support as red 
cell transport research? Why does the medical school's 
primary objective of education not include expansion 
of the student's experience into the community, instead 
of that objective being used as an excuse for withdraw¬ 
al from, or at least a “go slow” policy with regard to 
commitment to, the community? Why isn’t the health 
condition of the ghetto considered as great a problem 
for the medical center and as deserving of concentrated 
effort as the search for the etiology of lupus erythema¬ 
tosus? In short, the students wondered who will devise 
a system to take care of the people, if not the medical 
center? 

We also learned this summer that we could act as 


intermediaries to bring together people from the medi- i 
cal center and people from the community. Somehow, 
feelings had developed in the community about key | 
personnel in the medical center and reciprocal feelings j 
and trepidations had developed in the medical center i 
about community leaders without the two groups ever 
having met. The meetings brought no dramatic resolu¬ 
tion of the feelings on either side, but they were the j 
beginning of a continuing series of dialogues. In addi¬ 
tion, Dean Redlich held a luncheon for many of the ; 
community workers in the project and, through their i 
stories, was directly exposed to conditions in the three I 
areas. The workers were impressed by his concern, and j 
he by their insight, eloquence, and dedication to the 
communities. 

The students also learned that they could bring about 
actual changes in the medical school by collective ac¬ 
tion. In the project grant of $217,000 from OEO was an 
item of $15,000 to pay for one year’s living expenses 
for three black students. Dean Redlich knew of this in 
May and said that the school would recruit the three 
students for the fall of 1969. During the summer, the 
Yale Student Health Project acquired a list of possible 
candidates for admission in September, 1968. The in¬ 
formation was passed on to the Dean who immediately 
reconvened a special committee charged with recruiting 
black and Puerto Rican students. The new objective 
was to take three students in September, 1968, and con¬ 
siderably more in the fall of 1969. The committee 
swung into action with the Student Health Project rep¬ 
resentative, John Blanton, taking an active role, and 
the commitment was met. 

Ill 

Many people have argued that the concerns of the stu¬ 
dent health projects exceed the traditional boundaries 
of the field of medicine and that many of its activities 
belong under auspices other than those of a medical 
school. Yet perhaps the current rules of acceptability 
need changing. As they now stand, they provide for the 
treatment of lead poisoning, but permit the victim to 
return to the environment where the poisoning oc¬ 
curred; they include the treatment of pneumonia, but 
let the convalescent go back to an unheated apartment 
in the middle of winter; they include the treatment of 
a child with strep throat, but permit him to return 
home to sleep in the same bed with four siblings; they 
provide immunizations to children and permit them — 
at least in Riverhead, Long Island — to live in homes 
that are flooded whenever it rains. In short, the rules 


10 



cover all the events that take place within the walls of 
the medical center and neglect the fact that it is outside 
those walls that the people get sick. 

It is not an easy thing to fulfill the three-fold objec¬ 
tives of a medical center: teaching, research, and ser¬ 
vice. The question that must be asked is which really 
has the top priority and which must suffer at the ex¬ 
pense of the others. If teaching and research are top 
priority objectives, then service must be fitted around 
them. As the chairman of a clinical department in the 
medical school put it at a recent conference when de¬ 
scribing how he views the trinity of the medical center, 
service is the olive in the martini. But the view is real¬ 
istic only when, as in California, the university medical 


center is not the sole provider of care for a community 
and there is another institution whose only reason for 
being is the care of patients who desperately need it. 
In New Haven there is no reasonable alternative to 
Yale-New Haven Hospital. Thus the luxury of viewing 
service as an adjunct to teaching and research cannot 
be afforded here. Too much is at stake. 

The trinity must, at the very least, be composed of 
equal parts. Viewed in this light, the activities of the 
student health projects are more acceptably within the 
proper concerns of modern medicine. It is hoped that 
the experience of over 500 health science students in 
the summer of 1968 will help insure that a redefinition 
of the trinity will be forthcoming. 


Medical students working in the New Haven program included John W. 
Blanton, Jr., ’70, who assisted with physical examinations for children 
attending day camp. 



11 



AIM Campaign 


T he Alumni in Medicine campaign is now under way 
in eighty communities and areas throughout the na¬ 
tion, it is reported by Dr. Leona Baumgartner (’34), gen¬ 
eral chairman. At press time, a total of $700,000 had 
been raised from medical alumni, and the general chair¬ 
man predicts that the first million dollars can be 
realized shortly through the continuing efforts of over 
300 regional leaders and committee members now en¬ 
gaged in the capital fund-raising program. 

To implement still further the work of the Alumni in 
Medicine campaign in the months ahead, Dr. Baum¬ 
gartner recently announced the expansion of the na¬ 
tional campaign cabinet. The key group of Yale doctors, 
which she heads, includes: Dr. J. Roswell Gallagher 
(’30) and Dr. George T. Pack (’22) vice-chairmen; also 
Dr. A. John Anlyan (’45), Dr. George A. Carden, Jr. 
(’35), Dr. Benjamin Castleman (’31), Dr. Vincent J. Col¬ 
lins (’42), Dr. Lycurgus M. Davey (’43), Dr. DeWitt 
Dominick (’34), Dr. Robert C. Horn, Jr. (’37), Dr. William 
L. Kissick (’57). Also Dr. Stephen F. Nagyfy (’36), Dr. 
Charles W. Neuhardt (’37), Dr. Nelson Newmark (’31), 
Dr. John B. Ogilvie (’34), Dr. Lawrence K. Pickett (’44), 
Dr. Myron A. Sallick (’24), Dr. Abraham J. Schechter 
(’31), Dr. Donald W. Seldin (’43), Dr. Louis E. Silcox 
(’35), Dr. Paul Talalay (’48), Dr. N. William Wawro (’38), 
Dr. Louis G. Welt (’38), Dr. Ashbel C. Williams (’35). 

Three Areas Near $100,000 

The Hartford, Connecticut, area committee, with co- 
chairmen Dr. Edward Nichols (’38) and Dr. Wawro, had 
recorded almost $100,000 in gifts by the end of the 
year. The Boston and Springfield, Massachusetts, com¬ 
mittees have registered over $90,000 through efforts 
headed by Drs. Baumgartner, Castleman, Newmark, and 
J. Edward Flynn (’30). The New York metropolitan 
area has produced a total of $99,000 through the efforts 
of Dr. Carden and his committee. 


Gift Levels High 

Medical alumni are taking advantage of pledge and 
deferred giving provisions in making generous commit¬ 
ments to the School of Medicine through the Alumni in 
Medicine campaign. Alumni are being encouraged to 
consider tax advantages in extending their pledges over 
a three to five-year term. Many have elected to utilize 
life income plans, trust agreements, bequests, and other 
forms of commitments. 

The table at the right indicates the range and number 
of gifts received to date. 



Dr. Arthur Ebbert, Jr., associate dean, addressing the AIM campaign 
dinner in New Haven in October, brought a message from Dean Rediich 
in which he said: “We propose to have a balanced school, not a school of 
human biology. We propose to give our students a proper grounding in 
the biological as well as the behavioral and social sciences that are 
essential for modern health care. Even the most practical clinician should 
benefit from the scholarly spirit of the university setting; the most 
sheltered basic scientist must not be oblivious to major practical health 
needs. We want to address ourselves more emphatically to some of the 
practical problems of health care delivery. In building a new and 
outstanding program we will take advantage of the ideological, 
geographical, and organizational closeness of Yale University to its 
medical school. Few other medical schools enjoy this advantage to a 
comparable degree.” 

Dr. Rediich and Dr. Baumgartner, both scheduled to speak at the dinner, 
were unable to attend because of acute viral infections. 


12 














Regional Campaign Activities 

One of the most recent major campaign develop¬ 
ments is in New Haven, where Dr. Davey has a team 
of sixty committee members who currently are ap¬ 
proaching 365 medical alumni in the area for their 
pledges. This phase of the program was launched by a 
two-day seminar held at the university in October. 
Chairman Davey’s committee members have accounted 
for over $60,000 as a result of concentrated effort on 
year-end gift considerations. 

Dr. Welt has been working on campaign organiza¬ 
tion in North Carolina, following a preliminary well-at¬ 
tended meeting of medical alumni held in Chapel Hill in 
mid-December. Dr. Talalay is serving as chairman for 
Maryland AIM activities, particularly in the Baltimore 
area. Drs. Horn, Conrad Lam [’32], and Richmond 
Smith, Jr. (’42) are accelerating solicitation of medical 
alumni in Michigan. Drs. Max Miller (’35) of Cleveland; 
Henry Hartman (’35) of Toledo; Goffredo Accetta (’51) 
of Cincinnati; Robert Rowe (’40) of Akron; and Edward 
Call, Jr. (’59) of the Dayton area, are providing leader¬ 
ship for the Ohio program. 

Drs. Gilbert Eisner (’56), James Patrick (’56), and 
Herbert Winston (’57) have assumed responsibility for 
follow-up on Washington, D. C. medical alumni now 
that the former Washington chairman, Dr. Kissick, is 
located in Philadelphia. Dr. T. S. Danowski (’40) is pro¬ 
viding leadership for the Pittsburgh AIM program, ably 
assisted by Drs. William Kiesewetter (’49hs), Hilda 
Kroeger (’49mph), and Charles Wood (’30). 

Planning AIM campaign action for the coming months are Dr. /. Roswell 
Galiagher, ’30, vice-chairman of the campaign; Dr. Lycurgus M. Davey 
'43, head of the New Haven area team; and Robert L. Hart, assistant 
director for medical affairs in the Office of University Development. 



West Coast Emphasis 

Newly revitalized California committees in Los An¬ 
geles, San Francisco, Santa Barbara, Bakersfield, and 
San Diego accelerated their activities at the end of the 
year. The broad geographical expanse, and the lack of 
concentration of Yale medical alumni, make formal or¬ 
ganization difficult. Nevertheless, leaders and commit¬ 
tees are completing solicitations with admirable results. 
Oregon and Washington committees have now been 
organized and will be engaged in full campaign activity 
early in 1969. 

Other Areas 

Reports of campaign action continue to come into 
New Haven from thirteen committees in Connecticut, 
six regional groups in upstate New York, seven commit¬ 
tees in Massachusetts, and four groups in New Jersey. 
In addition, chairmen in Maine, New Hampshire, Ver¬ 
mont, and Rhode Island report ongoing interest and re¬ 
sults. Dr. Ashbel Williams is providing leadership for 
Florida AIM activities, particularly in the northern por¬ 
tion of the state. 

General chairman Leona Baumgartner, in a recent 
statement to the national campaign cabinet, emphasized 
the importance of the Alumni in Medicine campaign 
success and the chain reaction this can have on stimu¬ 
lating future massive support for the School of Medi¬ 
cine and Medical Center from foundations, corpora¬ 
tions, and individuals. She pointed out in addition, that 
all medical alumni, by their own personal involvement, 
provide partial repayment for “our own debt to the 
School and what it did for us. Our success in the cam¬ 
paign can assure the future development of the School 
and its training of present and future students.’’ 


Partial List of Gifts Received to Date 


Range of gifts 

No. of gifts 

Amount 

$50,000 and over 

2 

$100,000 

20,000 plus 

6 

142,021 

15,000 plus 

5 

77,000 

10,000 plus 

5 

50,000 

7,500 plus 

3 

23,170 

6,000 plus 

3 

18,000 

5,000 plus 

10 

50,700 

3,000 plus 

15 

48,385 

2,500 plus 

3 

7,763 

2,000 plus 

9 

18,770 

1,500 plus 

31 

47,100 

1,200 plus 

9 

11,047 

1,000 plus 

48 

48,130 


13 


Anatomist and Cancer Biologist 

I n the broad field of cancer research, one of the most 
promising avenues of investigation for more than thirty 
years has been the role of hormones in the stimulation 
of abnormal cell growth. Dr. William U. Gardner was 
one of the first scientists to advance the theory that 
hormonal imbalance is probably involved in many types 
of cancer, and his experiments over the years have 
borne out this hypothesis. 

Dr. Gardner came to Yale in 1933 from the Univer¬ 
sity of Missouri where his doctoral research had been 
concerned with the lactogenic hormone from the pitu¬ 
itary gland. Continuing his laboratory studies in New 
Haven on hormonal control of mammary glands, he be¬ 
came interested in the prevalence of breast cancer in 
certain types of mice. With Dr. Leonell C. Strong, who 
had recently come to Yale from the Roscoe B. Jackson 
Memorial Laboratory at Bar Harbor, Maine, he studied 
lesions in mammary tissue that preceded the formation 
of cancer and the effects of hormone injections on the 
incidence of mammary cancer. 

Drs. George M. Smith and Edgar Allen also collabo¬ 
rated in these early experiments. The investigators 
found that with a combination of suitable genetic fac¬ 
tors and suitable hormones they could produce not only 
mammary tumors but also tumors of the pituitary gland, 
adrenal cortex, lymphoid tissue, uterine cervix, testicular 
interstitial cells, and ovaries of laboratory animals. 

The baffling part of these studies was that no clear 
pattern emerged showing the relationship between the 
type and amount of the hormone and the development 
of the cancer. The same hormone that caused abnormal 
cell growth in one kind of tissue was found to bring 
about remission of abnormal growth in the cells of an¬ 
other kind of tissue, and hormones that induced tumors 
of a particular organ in one strain of mice did not in¬ 
duce them in another strain. 

The key to these mysteries, Dr. Gardner feels, may 
lie in the genetic information carried by the cells them¬ 
selves. His studies in recent years have been directed 
toward finding out how genetic differences work in 
regulating the potentialities of tissues and organs for 
neoplastic response. The mice he uses in these studies 
include a number of inbred strains, some of which were 
developed by Dr. Strong at the Jackson Laboratory and 
presented to Dr. Gardner when Dr. Strong left Yale in 
1953 to go to Roswell Park Memorial Hospital in Buf¬ 
falo. One strain started by Dr. Gardner some twenty- 
five years ago is now in its sixty-sixth generation of 
brother-sister inbreeding. The colony has varied in 
number between 10,000 and about 3,000, where it stands 
at present. Once housed in the "Mouse House" behind 



Faculty Profile: William Ullman Gardner, Ph.D. 
Ebenezer K. Hunt Professor of Anatorm 


the medical school power plant, the mice now occupy a 
large room in the Animal Care Division’s modern new 
quarters on the ground floor of the Sterling Hall B 
wing. Immediately adjacent to the mouse quarters is the 
laboratory where Dr. Gardner and his associates con¬ 
duct their research. 

"These mice are so inbred that one could transplant 
any tissue one wanted — endocrine glands, lungs, even 
heart, if it were technically possible,” Dr. Gardner says. 
Genetically identical animals are essential to the re¬ 
search not only because they permit tissue grafts with¬ 
out rejection, but because only by crossing strains 
whose specific susceptibilities to tumor inducement are 
known can patterns of inheritance be studied. 

Through his studies, Dr. Gardner has demonstrated 
that mice of the inbred A strain will develop tumors of 
the testicular interstitial cells following prolonged treat¬ 
ment with the female hormone, estrogen. Mice of the 
inbred C.-, - strain that receive the same treatment, how¬ 
ever, will develop pituitary tumors but not testicular 


14 







tumors. When the A and C strains are hybridized and 
the offspring injected with estrogen over a prolonged 
period, they develop both types of tumors. 

“We know that the genetic difference is in the end 
organ itself,” Dr. Gardner says. “When we transplant 
the target tissues from a susceptible strain and a non- 
susceptible strain into the same animal — a hybrid 
offspring of the two strains — the tissue from the sus¬ 
ceptible strain will develop tumors under estrogen 
treatment, but the tissue from the nonsusceptible strain 
will not.” 

These laboratory experiments are beginning to re¬ 
veal clues to possible patterns and mechanisms in¬ 
volved in cancer, the second largest cause of death in 
the United States. Indispensable research continues on 
the treatment and cure of cancer patients through sur¬ 
gery, radiation, and drugs, but it is through basic studies 
like Dr. Gardner’s that man will some day acquire the 
knowledge needed to prevent abnormal cell growth. 

Apart from his reputation for outstanding scientific 
contributions, Dr. Gardner has achieved international 
recognition for his leadership in the organization and 
administration of cancer research programs. In 1947, as 
president of the American Association for Cancer Re¬ 
search, he helped organize the Fourth International 
Cancer Research Congress in St. Louis, Missouri. At 
that meeting, a world-wide effort was launched to con¬ 
quer cancer through research, and Dr. Gardner began 
his long association with the international coordinating 


group, the Union Internationale Contre Le Cancer 
(UICC). From 1949 to 1952 he was vice-president of the 
UICC. Since 1960 he has been a member of the organi¬ 
zation’s executive committee and chairman of the com¬ 
mittee on fellowships which, in 1961, initiated the 
Eleanor Roosevelt International Cancer Research Fel¬ 
lowships. As the UICC’s efforts have expanded, addi¬ 
tional fellowships and visiting specialist programs have 
been added, and in 1966 Dr. Gardner was named chair¬ 
man of the newly formed Commission on Fellowships 
and Personnel Exchange. He is also currently president¬ 
elect of the UICC and will begin his four-year term as 
president in 1970. In still another world project, he has 
been a member since 1966 of the committee on fellow¬ 
ships of the International Agency for Research on Can¬ 
cer with headquarters at Lyon, France. 

In this country, Dr. Gardner has taken an active part 
in nearly every major organization, public and private, 
devoted to fighting cancer. For several years immedi¬ 
ately after World War II, when the programs of the 
National Institutes of Health were expanding rapidly, 
he was on the Board of Scientific Advisors to the Na¬ 
tional Cancer Institute. He served as chairman of the 
Board of Scientific Consultants from 1963 to 1965 and 
has been a special consultant to the institute since 1961. 
Last June he completed a six-year term on the Ameri¬ 
can Cancer Society’s Committee for the Development 
of Scientific Personnel. During the last two years he 
was chairman of this committee, which oversees the 


Twenty-two years ago this June the anatomy 
faculty sat, and stood, for a department 
portrait. In the front row were Drs. Ruth 
Schrader, L. S. Stone, H. Saxon Burr, William 
U. Gardner, Charles W. Hooker, and Fern W. 
Smith. Standing behind them were Drs. Min 
Shin Li, Robert G. Grenell, Ralph G. Meader, 
Thomas R. Forbes, Carroll A. Pfeiffer, Thomas 
F. Dougherty, Isaac Welt, and L. C. Strong. 



15 






















nation’s largest private fellowship program in cancer 
research. Currently he is on the Society’s committee to 
evaluate the fellowship program. 

Among his many other affiliations, Dr. Gardner takes 
an especially strong interest in two small, private funds 
which have their headquarters at Yale, the Anna Fuller 
Fund and the Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for 
Medical Research. He has been a scientific advisor to 
both since 1953. Each of the funds supports specific 
projects in cancer research as well as fellowships to 
provide further training for promising young investi¬ 
gators. Although the amounts of support they furnish 
are modest, the Fuller and Childs funds have been 
described as “catalytic agents” for large cancer re¬ 
search organizations such as the American Cancer So¬ 
ciety. Dr. Gardner points out that, as small foundations 
not limited by extensive regulations and complex oper¬ 
ating machinery, the funds can move quickly and effi¬ 
ciently to support advantageous research possibilities 
anywhere in the world. 

Dr. Gardner’s interest in biological science dates 
from his childhood on a farm at Kimbrae in south¬ 
western Minnesota, where he was born November 11, 
1907, the first of four children. Except for one summer 
on his grandfather’s ranch in Colorado, he spent his 
time as a youngster breeding and raising livestock and 
plowing and planting grain fields, and it seemed prob¬ 
able that, like his father, he would become a farmer. 
He learned to drive an eight-horse team with a three- 
bottom gang plow and sometimes helped blast out 
rocks to clear new fields for planting. When he was 
eleven years old an accidental dynamite detonator ex¬ 
plosion cost him the thumb and index finger of his 
left hand. 


In laboratory experiments with mice. Dr. Gardner studies the role of 
hormonal imbalance in cancerous cell growth. 



The accident did not lessen his interest in farming, 
however, and in 1926 he entered South Dakota State j 
College to study agriculture. Working his way through 
school, he first did odd jobs that ranged from waiting 
on tables and stoking furnaces to milking cows. But j 
these jobs paid only thirty-five cents an hour and he 
found himself working ten hours a day to make ends I 
meet. During his final year he got a job as a teaching 
assistant in dairy management and became so affluent, 
because his wages had risen to $1.50 an hour, that he 
was able to buy a car. 

It was at this period that he began to develop a 
strong interest in theoretical science. “I was amazed to 
realize how little I knew about a great many things, 
including animal physiology,” he now says. “I finished 
college in 1930 and those were pretty bad days on the 
farm. I really wanted to keep on learning, so I applied 
for graduate school.” 

He chose Missouri mainly for its program in physi¬ 
ology under C. W. Turner. But as it turned out, Dr. 
Edgar Allen, the professor of anatomy and dean of the 
University of Missouri School of Medicine, also be¬ 
came one of his most influential mentors. Dr. Gardner 
earned his M.A. degree in 1931 and the following year 
received a Gregory Fellowship to complete his doctoral 
work. He was awarded the Ph.D. degree in 1933, 

In his doctoral thesis Dr. Gardner described a rabbit 
unit of the pituitary lactogenic hormone as a biological 
standard, and this unit is still used by some researchers 
for standardization of biologic lactogenic activity. Sub¬ 
sequently, Oscar Riddle of the Carnegie Institute found 
that the same hormone would produce crop-milk in 
pigeons, and the pigeon unit has now generally super¬ 
seded Dr. Gardner’s rabbit unit as the biological stan¬ 
dard. 

From Missouri, Dr. Gardner planned to go to the Uni¬ 
versity of Wisconsin in order to work with the endo¬ 
crinologist Frederick L. Hisaw. Just about the time his 
application for a fellowship at Wisconsin was ap¬ 
proved, Milton C. Winternitz, dean of the Yale School 
of Medicine, came to Missouri to visit Dr. Allen. Imme¬ 
diately after the Yale dean’s visit, Dr. Allen called Dr. 
Gardner to his office and said, “I'm going to Yale to 
chair a new department of anatomy and I’d like you to 
come too.” Dr. Gardner recalls that the idea came as 
something of a shock to him. “I thought to myself, 
Yale? That's where Albie Booth is. Then I realized I 
also knew of the researches of some of the people in 
science there — Professors Ross Harrison, L. B. Mendel, 
and J. F. Fulton. But I still couldn’t think what state 
Yale was in. I guess I was truly provincial.” Actually, 


16 





he was probably more cosmopolitan in outlook than 
many young postgraduate scientists in eastern univer¬ 
sities, a quality that was to become evident later in his 
versatile career as investigator, teacher, academic ad¬ 
ministrator, and leader in national and international 
efforts to advance the cause of cancer research. 

The Department of Anatomy of which Dr. Allen was 
named chairman in 1933 replaced a section of the 
Biology Department that had previously been responsi¬ 
ble for teaching anatomy to Yale medical students. Dr. 
Gardner came to the new department as a National 
Research Council Fellow and two years later, in 1935, 
joined the regular faculty. He moved through succes¬ 
sive promotions and was an associate professor when, 
in 1943, he was appointed professor and chairman of 
the department following the death of Dr. Allen. Last 
year, after nearly a quarter of a century of administra¬ 
tion, he relinquished the chairmanship to devote his 
full time to research and teaching. 

During his early years at Yale, Dr. Gardner taught 
embryology and later microscopic anatomy. But he is a 
gross anatomist, he says, as a result of the Second 
World War. “Between people in the department going 
into military service and the competition among medi¬ 
cal schools for teaching personnel, there was a time 
when I was the only person carried over from year to 
year who was available to teach gross anatomy. Each 
fall I would have one or two new teachers in the 
course. So we started using the prosection method of in¬ 
struction in order to teach the teachers at the same 
time as the students.’’ 

The prosection method involved a preliminary dis¬ 
section which the instructor used for demonstration 
purposes before the students began their own dissec¬ 
tions. As a teaching technique, it proved so successful 
that it was continued even after the medical school re¬ 
turned to normal. Beginning in 1965, the prosection 
demonstration was transmitted to closed-circuit televi¬ 
sion from a studio in the department to screens in the 
student laboratories, and more recently the demonstra¬ 
tions have been put on videotape so that they can be 
used many times over. (See the Winter, 1966, issue of 
Yale Medicine for an article, “Anatomy Demonstrations 
Telecast.’’) 

As a teacher, Dr. Gardner commands wide admiration 
and respect. “He’s one of the best,” a fourth-year stu¬ 
dent said recently. “When our class took gross anatomy 
we had table conferences, sort of on-the-spot oral 
quizzes, and some people were scared of Dr. Gardner 
because his questions are really hard and make you 
think. He’s firm, but he’s always very gentle and never 


As a teacher, he ranks high with students. During his chairmanship, the 
department introduced the use of closed-circuit television for 
demonstrating anatomy prosections. Note screen in the background. 


Past, present, and future presidents of the Union Internationale Contre 
Le Cancer at a meeting of UICC executive committee in Locarno, 
Switzerland, last May. They are the immediate past president, Sir 
Alexander Haddow, director of the Chester Beatty Cancer Institute in 
London; the current president, Dr. N. N. Blokhin, director of the Academy 
of Medical Science in Moscow; and Dr. Gardner, president-elect, who 
will assume the top office in 1970. 


17 



hurts or makes fun of anyone.” In addition to lecturing 
and laboratory teaching, Dr. Gardner supervises re¬ 
search by medical students preparing dissertations on 
problems related to abnormal cell growth. 

His professional productivity is such that Dr. Gardner 
might be expected to enjoy relatively passive recrea¬ 
tion, but that is not the case. Although he still has the 
enthusiasm for football that made Albie Booth his first 
association with Yale, and he loves to paint — ‘‘Grandma 
Moses style,” he calls it — he is more likely to be found 
at home on a Saturday sawing up a fallen tree for fire¬ 
wood, building a flagstone terrace, or working in the 
garden with his attractive, vivacious wife, Katherine. 

Mrs. Gardner, a native of Columbia, Missouri, met 


At their home in Orange, Dr. and Mrs. Gardner have created a beautiful 
garden and woodland setting. Two stone footbridges spanning their 
brook were built by Dr. Gardner. 



her husband when he was in graduate school, and they 
were married in 1934. For the past nineteen years they 
have made their home in Orange where they bought a 
house under construction and planned the completed 
design themselves. The first autumn they lived there, 
Dr. Gardner did a painting of the garden and woods be¬ 
hind the house — a blaze of brilliant yellow, red, and 
orange chrysanthemums against the fall foliage. His 
wife has an expert touch with flowers, both the culti¬ 
vated varieties that grow in beds and borders on the 
beautifully landscaped lawn and the wildflowers and 
ferns in the woodland that is part of the Gardner prop¬ 
erty. 

In these woods a meandering brook is crossed by two 
stone footbridges that Dr. Gardner designed and built 
himself. His skill at masonry is evident also in a large, 
handsomely proportioned fireplace and patio where the 
family — which includes Mrs. Gardner’s father, E. V. 
Homsley — enjoy cookouts and barbecue meals in warm i 
weather. Cooking is one of Dr. Gardner’s many other j 
talents, and he is noted for gourmet renderings of 
dishes as diverse as shrimp creole and turkey with 
stuffing. 

Like her husband, Katherine Gardner has a strong 
artistic flair. Their gracious home is full of warm, bright 
colors and fascinating art objects collected on their 
foreign travels or sent to them by friends in all parts of 
the world. Many of the paintings on the walls are his — j 
landscapes showing farms, fields, woods, and streams 
— but one that hangs in Dr. Gardner’s den was done 
by his wife. A surrealistic scene of figures in a sort of 
prayer-dance ritual, it expresses great vibrancy and joy. 

Dr. and Mrs. Gardner have travelled widely. His re¬ 
sponsibilities in various international programs for 
cancer research take him abroad several times a year 
and together they have visited most parts of the world. 
Last spring they were in Geneva, Lausanne, and 
Locarno, Switzerland, for meetings of the UICC and in 
Milan, Italy, where Dr. Gardner took part in programs 
opening a new cancer hospital. In October he spent 
several days in Lyon, France, at the headquarters of the 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. UICC 
meetings will take him back to Switzerland at the end 
of January and again in May, and in June he will partic¬ 
ipate in a special congress at the Cancer Institute in 
Perugia, Italy. 

Fortunately, both the Gardners thoroughly enjoy 
travel and all the opportunities it brings. But, as Dr. 
Gardner says, it’s always good to get home — and home 
for him means life in Orange and in the laboratories 
and classrooms of Yale. 


IB 








Peter Parker and the Canton Ophthalmic Hospital 


by Oscar Wand, M.D. 


This portrait of Peter Parker and the two paintings on pages 20 
and 21 were executed by Lam-Qua, uncle of a grateful medical 
student. Parker's likeness, which hangs in the medical school’s 
Beaumont Room, was his gift to the University, 



C hina for all practical purposes was closed to the 
West until she was defeated hy the British in the 
war of 1839-1842. The treaty that concluded the so- 
called Opium War opened five Chinese ports to trade 
and established the rights of foreign residents. The Mid¬ 
dle Kingdom was to remain open to western influence 
for the next century. Missionaries and educators fol¬ 
lowed in the steps of diplomats and traders. Some years 
before the explosive entry of China into the western 
sphere of influence, however, an American physician 
and minister had already opened a hospital in Canton. 
There, he enjoyed the respect if not the complete con¬ 
fidence of the Chinese at a time when westerners were 
regarded as “foreign devils.” Skilled in medicine and 
surgery, the Rev. Peter Parker, M.D., had “opened the 
gates of China at the point of a lancet when European 
cannon could not heave a single bar.” 


Peter Parker was born to farm parents of modest 
means in Framingham, Massachusetts, on June 18, 1804. 
All the children in the family were raised under the 
strong religious influences of their devout parents. Early 
in life Peter was to ask himself, “What shall I do to be 
saved?” While still a student at Amherst College, he re¬ 
flected at the time of his 24th birthday, “I am willing to 
toil and to suffer pain and weariness of the flesh, if I 
may but become qualified for extensive usefulness.” It 
must have been at about this time that he contemplated 
a missionary life. On the advice of ministerial friends, 
in his senior year he transferred to Yale College where 
he might better prepare for such a life. That year in 
New Haven proved rewarding in terms of scholastic 
achievements and extra-curricular religious activities. In 
a letter to his mother in 1833, Parker wrote, “I am at 
times almost ready to sink under the responsibilities 


19 



that my contemplated course of life involves. How 
great, how numerous the qualifications indispensable to 
a missionary in China.” It was with a deep sense of re¬ 
sponsibility that he had enrolled in the divinity and 
medical schools for postgraduate training. 

There is no mention in his personal record of any 
prior interest in medicine, but his work with the poor 
of New Haven during the cholera epidemic that swept 
the eastern United States in 1832-1833 must have con¬ 
vinced him of the advantage of a medical education. 
China was chosen as the site for his missionary work 
because of her millions of “heathens” who stood to 
benefit from healing of the soul as well as of the body. 

Parker’s medical education appears, for the most part, 
to have been limited to lectures, for there is no mention 
of his working in the hospital or performing any opera¬ 
tions. It is a reflection of his skill and courage that he 
was later to perform difficult operations under primitive 
conditions. In March, 1834, Peter Parker was awarded 
the M.D. degree from Yale; two months later he was 
ordained a minister of the Presbyterian Church. On 
June 1, the American Board of Commissioners for For¬ 
eign Missions appointed him a missionary to China 
with the following mandate: “The medical and surgical 
knowledge you have acquired, you will employ, as you 
have the opportunity, in relieving the bodily afflictions 
of the people. You will also be ready, as you can, to aid 
in giving to them our arts and sciences. But these, you 
will never forget, are to receive your attention only as 
they can be made handmaids to the Gospel. The char¬ 
acter of a physician, or of a man of science — respect¬ 
able as they are, or useful as they may be in evangelizing 
China — you will never suffer to supersede or interfere 
with your character of a teacher of religion.” 

When the Rev. Peter Parker, M.D., arrived in Canton 
in October, 1934, he was among a handful of westerners 
who were barely tolerated. They were restricted to fac¬ 
tory areas facing the river and were forbidden to learn 
Chinese. Perhaps for the latter reason, Dr. Parker soon 
went to Singapore where conditions were more hospi¬ 
table to his learning the language. He returned to Canton 
in the spring of 1835, partially for reasons of health, but 
mostly because he was eager to put into practice some 
of the developments he had witnessed in Singapore. He 
reported: “Encouraged by the success of a dispensary 
at Singapore for the Chinese, where, from the 1st of 
January, 1835, to the following August, more than 1,000 
were received, it was resolved on my return to Canton, 
to open a similar institution here.” 

The opening of Dr. Parker’s Ophthalmic Hospital in 
Canton inaugurated a new approach in mission work. 


Heretofore, the introduction of western medicine had 
been sporadic and dependent on the generosity of a 
few well-meaning surgeons who sailed with the trading 
vessels of the East India Company. It was one of them, 
Dr. Alexander Pierson, who introduced vaccination into 
China in 1805. In 1820 and again in 1827, dispensaries 
were opened in Macao and operated for several years. 
But these were not missionary endeavors. The signifi¬ 
cance of the founding of a mission hospital was noted 
by S. Wells Williams, a contemporary Asian expert 
(and later, professor of Chinese at Yale): “The arrival 
of Dr. Peter Parker from New York, in 1834, had added 
to the force an enthusiastic missionary of exceptional 
vigor and ability, who by his medical training was able 


Paintings are pre- and post-operative clinical studies of a patient 
suffering from a bone cyst, the result of a twice-broken humerus. The 
patient made a good recovery and, said Parker, was "the first Chinese 



20 









to introduce a new factor that has performed a service 
of the highest importance between foreigners and Chi¬ 
nese, by removing their mutual misunderstandings. This 
was the establishment at Canton of a dispensary and 
hospital for the free treatment of natives.” 

It was felt that an ophthalmic hospital could best fur¬ 
ther the goals of the mission inasmuch as ‘‘[Diseases of 
the eye were selected as those the most common in 
China, and being a class in which the native practi¬ 
tioners are most impotent, the cures, it was supposed, 
would be as much appreciated as any other.” 

The three-story converted factory by the waterfront 
soon began to receive patients with all types of illness, 
so many that some were turned away for lack of accom- 


who has ever voluntarily submitted to the amputation of a limb.” In 
addition to the medical detail in his illustrations, Lam-Qua often included 
delicate Cantonese landscapes as background for Parker's tumor patients. 



modation. The accomplishments of the hospital became 
known throughout the provinces, attracting patients 
from all strata of society. It was improper, at that time, 
for a woman to enter foreigners’ buildings; however, a 
member of the gentle sex, if required to be a house pa¬ 
tient, was cared for by relatives who served as atten¬ 
dants. Though the hospital did not have government 
sanction, officials gave it tacit approval by seeking its 
services. Except for a short period when he was as¬ 
sisted by a Chinese physician educated at the Anglo- 
Chinese College in Malacca, Dr. Parker took care of all 
patients. In the first year, over 2,000 patients were 
treated and countless operations performed. As antici¬ 
pated, it was in the realm of ophthalmic surgery that 
Dr. Parker won his greatest acclaim. The treatment for 
cataracts was couching, a procedure in which the 
opaque lens was displaced downward, out of the line of 
vision by a lancet. One elderly beneficiary remarked, “I 
have lived till my beard has become long and hoary, 
but never before have I seen or heard of one who does 
such things as are done in this hospital.” Dr. Parker 
was quick to credit his success to the blessings of the 
Lord. In winning the confidence of the people, he was 
convinced that the medical mission succeeded in win¬ 
ning an entrance for the gospel. 

In addition to patient care, Dr. Parker found time to 
pursue Chinese studies and to do translations, skills 
that served him well later in diplomatic functions. He 
devoted much effort to education too, foreseeing the 
time when the hospital would be entirely staffed by 
local people. He took under his tutelage bright young 
students who were to become famous in their own 
right. 

Among the promising young men was Kwan Ato who, 
according to the December 1937 quarterly report from 
the Ophthalmic Hospital, was proficient in English and 
dexterous in surgery. His uncle, Lam-Qua, had studied 
under the talented English artist, George Chinnery. 
Gratified by Parker’s many services to his people and to 
his nephew, Lam-Qua painted nearly two hundred pic¬ 
tures of the hospital's tumor patients, limning their 
symptoms in minute detail. Said Lam-Qua, when offered 
remuneration for his work, ‘‘As there is no charge for 
‘cutting,’ 1 can make none for painting.” 

The paintings had more than just medical and artistic 
meaning to Parker for he made extensive use of them 
on his lecture tours in the United States and Europe for 
the dual purposes of arousing interest in and raising 
funds for his hospitals in Canton. Many of the paint¬ 
ings are now housed at the Yale School of Medicine and 
at Gordon’s Museum of Guy’s Hospital in London. 


21 


The success of the Ophthalmic Hospital would not 
have been possible without the financial support and 
encouragement of local British and American merchants 
from the beginning. With their further support, the 
foundation of the hospital was strengthened by the 
establishment of the Medical Missionary Society in 
China in February, 1838. This was the first medical mis¬ 
sionary society in the world from which all others were 
to take inspiration and impetus. An endowment was 
established for the provision of facilities to encourage 
medical mission work. Even as such plans were being 
made, however, relations between Britain and China 
were being strained to the breaking-point. Grievances 
between the two countries had been accumulating and, 
with the outbreak of hostilities, foreigners were ex¬ 
pelled from Canton and the hospital was closed. In the 
summer of 1840, Dr. Parker left for the United States 
and for a much needed rest. 

His eighteen months in the United States were spent 
in arousing interest and support for medical missions. 
Already an acknowledged expert of Chinese affairs, Dr. 
Parker was invited to preach to the House and Senate 
and met and discussed Sino-American relationships 
with Secretary of State-designate Daniel Webster. He 
also had the good fortune to meet Harriet Webster, the 
Secretary’s niece, whom he married in March, 1841. 
Shortly thereafter, he undertook an extensive lecture 
tour in Europe “in prosecution of the objects of the 
Society.’’ These tours aroused great interest among pro¬ 
fessional and lay groups who contributed over $6,000 to 
his cause. Arrangements were made for the education 
of Chinese students in England and America and for 
the recruitment of physicians for service in China. 

When Mrs. Parker returned with her husband to 
Canton in November, 1842, she was the first Caucasian 
woman to establish residence there. The hospital was 
now relocated in a larger and more modern setting. 
Other mission doctors arrived and, with the help of 
Chinese assistants, patient care was expanded. Over 
3,000 patients were seen in the next year. Just when the 
hospital was again functioning on a secure basis, Dr. 
Parker was presented with a new challenge. In 1844 
President Tyler sent Caleb Cushing as Minister Pleni¬ 
potentiary to China to negotiate treaties between the 
United States and China. One of Cushing's first official 
acts was to enlist Dr. Parker's services as Chinese Sec¬ 
retary and interpreter to the Legation. Assured by 
Cushing’s successor, Commodore James Biddle, that his 
duties as a missionary doctor would not be compro¬ 
mised, Parker accepted the post which included an an¬ 
nual stipend of $1,500. The Prudential Committee of 


the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Mis¬ 
sions granted approval. However, as 1845 drew to a 
close, Dr. Parker received a painful rebuke from the 
Board which decreed that, inasmuch as he was already 
receiving a government salary and his work lay almost 
entirely in the held of medicine, he should look else¬ 
where for support. This incident aroused his righteous 
indignation and protest, but he was ignored; it was not 
until 1871, when he received an appointment as cor¬ 
porate member of the Board of Commissioners that he 
received vindication. 

Unshaken in his conviction, Peter Parker continued 
to serve for another ten years, as physician, missionary, 
and diplomat. During this period, he witnessed the ex¬ 
pansion of efforts that he had initiated. Debilitated by 
his arduous term of service, Dr. Parker left China in 
May, 1855, only to return immediately as Commissioner 
to China at the request of President Franklin Pierce. In 
later years, when honors were showered upon him, he 
must have taken especial satisfaction that “To tens of 
thousands of Chinese I have been permitted to preach 
the gospel of salvation, and to 52,000 afflicted with 
physical ills of our common humanity, directly or indi¬ 
rectly, I have been permitted to administer with a 
degree of success that demands praise to Him who is 
the giver of health and life.’’ 


Dr. Wand, Yale medical class of 1964, interned in sur¬ 
gery at St. Luke's Hospital in New York. From 1965 to 
1967 he served in the Navy Medical Corps; last year he 
studied at the Harvard School of Public Health, where 
he received the M.P.H. degree. Next fall he will serve 
his residency at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Hos¬ 
pital in Boston. Currently he is serving as staff psychia¬ 
trist at Agnew’s Hospital in San Jose, California. He 
writes, “It is no mere coincidence that I chose to write 
about Peter Parker and the Canton Ophthalmic Hospi¬ 
tal. As a future ophthalmologist and alumnus of the 
college and the medical school of Yale, I share com¬ 
mon ground with him. Tying us closer is the fact that I 
was the second recipient of the fellowship that bears 
his name which took me, as a sophomore medical stu¬ 
dent, to the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Mexico 
City in the summer of 1962. The Peter Parker Fellow¬ 
ship was established in 1961 by the Student Council of 
the Yale School of Medicine in honor of this pioneer 
medical missionary. Lastly, as a native of Shanghai, 
China, I take a natural interest in affairs of that country.’’ 


22 














In and About Sterling Hall 



Dr. Barrnett Named Chairman 
of Anatomy 

Dr. Russell J. Barrnett, an authority 
in the field of electron microscopy 
and cytochemistry, has been named 
chairman of the Department of Anat¬ 
omy. 

Dr. Barrnett, a native of Boston, 
Massachusetts, was graduated from 
the University of Indiana in 1943 and 
received his M.D. degree from Yale 
in 1948. On graduation from medical 
school he became a research fellow 
in anatomy at Harvard and then 
joined the faculty as an instructor. 
He was promoted to associate in 
1952 and to assistant professor in 
1954. He returned to Yale as an as¬ 
sociate professor in 1959 and was 
made a professor in 1962. 

He is currently chairman of the 
Executive Council of the Internation¬ 
al Society of Histochemistry and 
Cytochemistry, and a member of sev¬ 
eral professional organizations in¬ 
cluding the American Association of 
Electron Microscopists, the Ameri¬ 
can Association of Anatomists and 
the American Cell Biology Society. 
He has contributed extensively to 
professional journals and is, himself, 
an editor of the Journal of Histo¬ 
chemistry and Cytochemistry, An- 
n ales d'Histochemie, and the Journal 
of Ultrastructure Research. 

Library Associates Seek Members 

Over the entrance of a Theban li¬ 
brary, flourishing in the first century, 
were inscribed the words, “Medicine 
for the Soul.” Today, 2,000 years 


later, no twentieth century substitute 
has supplanted the library as an es¬ 
sential institution. To students, pro¬ 
fessors, doctors, and the casual 
browser, this is axiomatic. But there 
is a group, with representatives from 
all of these users, which is dedicated 
to insuring the continued growth and 
excellence of our library — the As¬ 
sociates of the Yale Medical Library. 

The Associates were organized in 
September of 1948, after members of 
the Yale Medical Library Committee 
had circularized a number of people 
who had previously shown interest 
in the Historical Library. The roster, 
including honorary and life mem¬ 
bers, today totals nearly 400 names. 
Members are not necessarily physi¬ 
cians; many are persons interested 
in medical history or in aiding the 
library in the continuance of some 
of its lesser known services in behalf 
of the public. Such services include 
inter-library loans, loans to doctors 
throughout the state and the country, 
and assistance to health delivery pro¬ 
grams at hospitals other than Yale- 
New Haven. The Yale Medical Li¬ 
brary has long felt a responsibility 
to serve members of the profession 
and other interested persons through¬ 
out the state, including medical per¬ 
sonnel attached to community hospi¬ 
tals unable to maintain full libraries. 




Because of the generosity of the 
Associates, the Medical Library has 
been able to acquire both historical 
and current books and to establish 
several endowed book funds honor¬ 
ing revered doctors, professors, and 
others who have had warm associa¬ 
tions with the School of Medicine. 


As a perquisite of membership, 
Associates are granted borrowing 
privileges. They receive bulletins at 
regular intervals, detailing acquisi¬ 
tions and notices of interest. And 
finally, Associates have the satisfac¬ 
tion of knowing that through their 
efforts they have made possible a 
variety of purchases and projects 
which could not otherwise have been 
undertaken. 

Inquiries regarding membership 
may be sent to the Librarian’s office. 

Associate Deans Appointed 


Mr. O’Connor Mr. Thompson 

John F. O’Connor, assistant dean for 
administration and lecturer in hospi¬ 
tal administration and psychiatry, 
has been made associate dean for ad¬ 
ministration, and John D. Thompson, 
professor of public health [hospital 
administration] and nursing admin¬ 
istration, has been made associate 
dean for planning. Both received 
their M.P.H. degrees from Yale. 

Mr. O’Connor, who joined the Yale 
faculty in 1964, has had considerable 
experience in the administration of 
health organizations. A former spe¬ 
cial assistant to the Connecticut 
Commissioner of Mental Health, he 
was the first administrator of the 
Connecticut Mental Health Center 
from 1964 to 1967, at which time he 
was named assistant dean of the 
medical school. 

Professor Thompson has been 
closely associated with problems of 
hospital planning and administration, 
both nationally and locally for nearly 
twenty years. Formerly assistant di¬ 
rector of Montefiore Hospital in New 
York, he joined the Yale faculty in 
1956 and directed a research project 




23 





















on hospital function and design that 
was the first of its kind in this 
country. 

Emeritus Professor Receives 
Pediatric Award 

Edith B. Jackson, M.D., clinical pro¬ 
fessor emeritus of pediatrics and psy¬ 
chiatry (Child Study Center] and 
presently visiting professor of pedi¬ 
atrics and psychiatry at the Univer¬ 
sity of Colorado School of Medicine 
in Denver, was the recipient of the 
American Academy of Pediatrics’ 
1968 C. Anderson Aldrich Award in 
Child Development. The award, 
which was presented at the Acad¬ 
emy’s annual meeting in Chicago in 
the fall, honored Dr. Jackson’s many 
outstanding contributions to the 
study of mother-child relationships 
and her achievements in the treat¬ 
ment and prevention of emotional 



Dr, Jackson makes the rounds of her 
"rooming-in'' unit at Colorado General 
Hospital. She introduced and directed a similar 
facility in the late '40s when she was a staff 
member of Grace-New Haven hospital. 

disturbances in children. Dr. Jack- 
son, who first came to the Yale 
medical school in 1923, helped estab¬ 
lish and then directed the rooming- 
in project at Grace New Haven 
Community Hospital until 1953. She 
was also instrumental in the devel¬ 
opment of the child psychiatric unit 
of the Department of Pediatrics. An¬ 
other innovative development was 
the intern home-visit plan for moth¬ 
ers of new infants. Under this pro¬ 
gram, pediatricians were able to see 
early parent-child problems and re¬ 
lationships in the home situation. 


In addition to her latest award, Dr. 
Jackson was the first recipient of the 
Agnes McGavin Award of the Amer¬ 
ican Psychiatric Association, honor¬ 
ing her achievements toward the pre¬ 
vention of emotional disorders in 
children. 

Faculty Notes 

Dr. Edward M. Cohart, C.-E. A. Wins¬ 
low Professor of Public Health, was 
the recipient of the C.-E. A. Winslow 
Medal in October. The medal, highest 
award of the Connecticut Public 
Health Association, honors the first 
chairman of the Department of Pub¬ 
lic Health at Yale. It is inscribed with 
the words, “For the betterment of the 
health of all peoples.” 

Dr. Joyce D. Gryboski, assistant 
professor of pediatrics, has been 
made a full member of the American 
Gastroenterological Association. Dr. 
Gryboski is one of four active pedia¬ 
tricians and one of three women to 
have membership in the organization. 

Dr. Jose M. R. Delgado, professor 
of physiology, gave the Salmon Lec¬ 
tures at the New York Academy of 
Medicine in early December. His 
topic was “Electronic Pacing of Be¬ 
havior.” The lectureship is among 
the highest honors bestowed by the 
psychiatric community. In the same 
week Dr. Delgado also received the 
Myrtle Wreath Award from the 
women’s Zionist organization, Ha- 
dassah. The award is given annually 
for outstanding achievement. 

Dr. Morton M. Kligerman, profes¬ 
sor and chairman of the Department 
of Radiology, was named president 
of the American Society of Thera¬ 
peutic Radiologists, at their recent 
meeting in Chicago. 

Dr. John A. Kirchner, professor 
and chief of the Section of Otolar¬ 
yngology, has been appointed editor 
of the Year Book of Ear, Nose and 
Throat. He was also elected recently 
to the board of editors of Annals of 
Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngol¬ 
ogy. In October Dr. Kirchner received 
an Award of Merit at the annual con¬ 
vention of the American Academy 


Dr. Kirchner 

of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngol¬ 
ogy held in Chicago. 

Dr. Arend Bouhuys, professor of 
medicine and epidemiology, has been 
appointed to serve on the Environ¬ 
mental Sciences Training Committee 
of the Division of Environmental 
Health Science of the U.S. Public 
Health Service. A European sojourn 
in the fall included attendance at the 
International Symposium on Body 
Plethysmography in Nijmegen, the 
Netherlands, where he presented a 
paper on techniques of measuring 
airway resistance and lung volumes 
with a body plethysmograph. From 
the Netherlands, Dr. Bouhuys pro¬ 
ceeded to Alicante, Spain, to present j 
material on respiratory function at 
the Second International Symposium 
on Respiratory Disease in Textile 
Workers. He presented field studies 
gathered over the previous year on 
byssinosis among hemp workers in 
that area in Spain. Dr. Eugenia Zus- 
kin, a member of his staff at the 
Pierce Laboratory and a research as¬ 
sociate in medicine, also reported on 
byssinosis and the incidence of this 
disease among U.S. cotton textile 
workers. 

Dr. David Weinman, II, professor 
of microbiology, devoted the past 
summer to the investigation of trypa¬ 
nosomiases of primates at the Uni¬ 
versity of Indonesia. In collaboration 
with colleagues at the university, he 
did field work in Java and southern 
Sumatra, following up findings made 
the previous year on the occurrence 



24 















of trypanosomiases among primates 
and the possible relation to infec¬ 
tions in humans. Results of the in¬ 
vestigation were reported at the 
Eighth International Congress on 
Tropical Medicine and Malaria held 
in Teheran in September. 

Dr. Byron H. Waksman, professor 
and chairman of the Department of 
Microbiology, was the principal 
speaker at the second meeting of the 
new Societe Frangaise d’lmmuno- 
logie held at the Institut Pasteur in 
Paris this fall. Dr. Waksman deliv¬ 
ered his lecture on “Current Prob¬ 
lems in the Field of Delayed Hyper¬ 
sensitivity” in French. 



Dr. Carl F. von Essen, associate 
professor of radiology, recently re¬ 
turned from an extended foreign tour 
during which he spent two months 
in Vellore, India, at the Christian 
Medical College Hospital, working on 
the study that is jointly sponsored 
by that institution, Yale, and the Na¬ 
tional Institutes of Health. This proj¬ 
ect involves clinical trials of chemo¬ 
therapeutic agents and radiation on 
the large number of buccal mucosa 
cancers seen in that part of the 
world. Dr. von Essen also visited ra¬ 
diation therapy departments in hos¬ 
pitals in London, Manchester, Upp¬ 
sala, Stockholm, Lund, Copenhagen, 
Hong Kong, and Tokyo. At the Karo- 
linska Tnstitutet in Stockholm he 
gave a lecture on “Epidemiological 
Studies in Oral Cancer.” 

Dr. Albert J. Solnit, director of the 
Child Study Center and professor of 


pediatrics and psychiatry, partici¬ 
pated in the twentieth anniversary 
program of the New Orleans Psycho¬ 
analytic Institute and in a joint meet¬ 
ing of the Western New England 
Psychoanalytic Society and the Bos¬ 
ton Psychoanalytic Society in Octo¬ 
ber. At both meetings, Dr. Solnit 
spoke on “A Psychoanalytic View of 
Youth Unrest.” In November, he 
spoke at the Fifteenth Annual Insti¬ 
tute of Child Psychiatry in a joint 
meeting of the Reiss-Davis Child 
Study Center and the Southern Cali¬ 
fornia State Chapter of the Ameri¬ 
can Academy of Pediatrics. His ad¬ 
dress was entitled “The Troubled 
Child — A Pediatric Perspective.” 

Dr. Stephen E. Malawista, assist¬ 
ant professor of medicine, was a fea¬ 
tured speaker at a meeting of the 
American Rheumatism Association 
in Atlanta, Georgia, in December. His 
address was entitled, “Colchicine, 
Vinblastine and Griseofulvin Are 
Bound to Cytoplasmic Protein, Not 
to Granules, in Leukocytes.” 

Dr. Theodore Lidz, professor and 
chairman of the Department of Psy¬ 
chiatry, gave the Frieda Fromm- 
Reichmann Memorial Lecture on 
November 15. His subject was “The 
Influence of Family Studies on the 
Treatment of Schizophrenic Pa¬ 
tients.” 

Dr. Ira V. Hiscock, Anna M. R. 
Lauder Professor Emeritus of Public 
Health, delivered a paper before the 
World Health Section of the Ameri¬ 
can Public Health Association meet¬ 
ings in Detroit in November. His 
message dealt with the translation 
of ideas into programs and the staff¬ 
ing and extension of health agencies 
toward more universal delivery of 
health services. During the same 
meetings, Dr. Hiscock addressed the 
International and Civil Affairs Health 
Society on “Health Problems and 
Opportunities in Vietnam.” In addi¬ 
tion, he has been appointed consul¬ 
tant to the Bernice P. Bishop Museum 
in Honolulu, Hawaii, and a member 
of the Connecticut Task Force on 
Clean Air and Clean Water. 


Dr. Cook 

Dr. Charles D. Cook, professor and 
chairman of the Department of Pe¬ 
diatrics, participated in the Interna¬ 
tional Congress of Pediatrics which 
met in Mexico City at the end of 
November. In addition, Dr. Cook was 
re-elected secretary-treasurer of the 
American Pediatric Society and will 
continue serving as the representa¬ 
tive of the American Pediatric So¬ 
ciety to the Joint Council of National 
Pediatric Societies. 

Dr. Harold O. Conn, associate pro¬ 
fessor of medicine, is on sabbatical 
leave and is visiting professor of 
medicine for the academic year at 
Washington University School of 
Medicine in St. Louis. Dr. Conn was 
recently elected to the Council of the 
American Association for the Study 
of the Liver. 

Dr. C. Lee Buxton, professor of 
obstetrics and gynecology, visited 
the Maternal and Child Health Sec¬ 
tion of the World Health Organiza¬ 
tion in Geneva, Switzerland, in the 
fall as a special consultant in medi¬ 
cal education. His five-week assign¬ 
ment was to assist in the develop¬ 
ment of a curriculum for the teach¬ 
ing of reproductive physiology in 
medical schools of emerging coun¬ 
tries. An authority in the fields of 
fertility and family planning, Dr. 
Buxton has been responsible for the 
introduction of several important in¬ 
novations in medical education. 

Dr. Lawrence R. Freedman, asso¬ 
ciate professor of medicine, attended 
the Fourth Asian-Pacific Cardiology 



25 





Contending captains, Drs. Jerome Beloff and Joel Alpert, shake Ya/e members, who were ardent though defeated were (rear row) Mike 

hands amicably before their match in front of Palmer Stadium. Cynamon, Robert Marier, fohn Blanton, Dr. E. Richard Weinerman, Geoffrey 

Each directs a Family Health Care program, the former at Kane, David Barry, and Dr. Beloff and (front row) Mrs. Beloff, Nat Gigfio 


Yale, the latter at Harvard. 

Congress in Tel-Aviv and Jerusalem, 
at which time he presented a paper 
on “The Epidemiology of Urinary 
Infections in Hiroshima, Japan, and 
their relation to Blood Pressure 
Levels and Chronic Pyelonephritis.’’ 
He also spoke at Tel-Hashomer Hos¬ 
pital in Tel-Aviv and Hadassah Hos¬ 
pital in Jerusalem. 

Dr. Joseph R. Bertino, associate 
professor of pharmacology and med¬ 
icine, has been made chairman of the 
Pharmacology and Therapeutics B 
Study Section of the National In¬ 
stitutes of Health for this academic 
year. 

Dr. Kenneth Keniston was a repre¬ 
sentative at the International Con¬ 
ference on Rebellion in the Univer¬ 
sity at Villa Serbelloni, Bellagio, 
Italy. The conference, which was 
held at the end of November, was 
sponsored by the Rockefeller Foun¬ 
dation. 

Dr. Donald C. Riedel, associate 
professor of public health, has been 
appointed a member of a National 
Advisory Committee to the Council 
of Teaching Hospitals-Association 
of American Medical Colleges In¬ 
formation Center. The Council is 
studying the possibility of establish¬ 
ing a teaching hospital information 
center as well as the development of 


(nutritionist), Garcia Barry, Ro 
Johnston (health aide). 

a means for disseminating the con¬ 
stantly changing body of informa¬ 
tion to those involved in the adminis¬ 
tration of teaching hospitals. 

Sporting News 

On the same Saturday when many a 
sports fan was travelling from New 
Haven to Cambridge to view what 
has come to be known as “The 
Game,’’ another stirring intercollegi¬ 
ate touch football scrimmage met in 
the same general locale some two 
hours earlier with the team of the 
Yale Family Health Care Program 
matched against the staff and stu¬ 
dents of an analagous comprehen¬ 
sive care program at Harvard. In a 
confrontation marked by informal¬ 
ity, minimal rules, and some rather 
unorthodox switching of players 
from one team to the other, the Har¬ 
vard squad finally eked out a 6-0 de¬ 
cision. Several disgruntled Yalies 
were understood to have spread the 
rumor that the Harvard team had de¬ 
voted time to practicing football over 
the preceding few weeks while the 
Elis busily practiced comprehensive 
medicine. The Cantabs of Compre¬ 
hensive Care insisted, however, that 
they played well and had earned 
their laurels honestly. 

Following the game, a picnic lunch 


a DiNolo (public health nurse), and Beth 

was held on the field outside the I 
stadium for all participants and their 
guests. Talk turned to a comparison I 
of medical care programs and expe¬ 
riences in Boston vis a vis New 
Haven. 

Organizers of this first annual en- j 
counter were Dr. Jerome Beloff, di- | 
rector of the Family Health Care Pro¬ 
gram at Yale and assistant professor > 
of public health and pediatrics, and J 
Dr. Joel Alpert, director of the com- : 
parable program in Boston and also 
on the pediatric staff at Harvard. 
Both programs are demonstrating, 
teaching, and conducting research in 1 
the use of health teams of medical | 
and allied medical personnel for the 1 
delivery of comprehensive health 
care to family units. Proof of the 
practical value of these programs is 
the fact that burgeoning neighbor¬ 
hood health centers across the coun¬ 
try are applying many of the tech¬ 
niques, first developed in the pro¬ 
grams, to the care of thousands of 
patients and their families. 

Dr. Deming Establishes 
Visiting Professorship 

Dr. Clyde L. Deming, clinical pro¬ 
fessor emeritus of urology, has es¬ 
tablished a visiting professorship in 
urology at Yale. The first incumbent 


26 








was Dr. J. Hartwell Harrison, Elliott 
Carr Cutler Professor of Surgery at 
Harvard and chief of the section of 
urology at Peter Bent Brigham Hos¬ 
pital, who spoke on October 28 on 
“Surgery of the Adrenals.” 

Dr. Deming, a resident of Hamden, 
Connecticut, received his M.D. de¬ 
gree from Yale in 1915. After com¬ 
pleting residency requirements in 
surgery and urology at Yale and 
Johns Hopkins, he returned to Yale 
as a member of the faculty. He was 
made an assistant professor of sur r 
gery in 1921, associate clinical pro¬ 
fessor in 1924, and professor of 
urology in 1929. He was named clin¬ 
ical professor of urology in 1932 and 
received emeritus status in 1954. 

Journal Honors Dr. Long 

The Yale Journal of Biology and 
Medicine has dedicated its second 
issue of the academic year, 1968-69, 
to Dr. C. N. H. Long, Sterling Profes¬ 
sor of Physiology. Guest editor of the 
dedication number is Dr. Philip K. 
Bondy, C. N. H. Long Professor of 
Medicine and chairman of the De¬ 
partment of Internal Medicine. 

The first feature in the issue is an 
appreciation of Dr. Long by Dr. 
Bondy, characterizing the former’s 
many years of dedicated leadership 
at Yale as chairman of the division 
of biological sciences of the univer¬ 
sity, as dean of the medical school, 
as a triple threat department head 
(physiological chemistry, physiology 
and pharmacology), and as a man. 

The contents also includes a com¬ 
plete bibliography of Dr. Long’s pub¬ 
lications, together with seven arti¬ 
cles written by former associates and 
students, detailing research initiated 
or stimulated by Dr. Long’s interest 
in the fields of physiology, endocrin¬ 
ology, and chemistry. 

Taylor Award to Dr. Casals 

Dr. Jordi Casals, professor of epi¬ 
demiology, received the Richard M. 
Taylor Award of the American Com¬ 
mittee for Arthropod-borne Viruses 
at the meeting of the American So¬ 


ciety of Tropical Medicine and Hy¬ 
giene, held in Atlanta, Georgia, at the 
end of October. 

The award, which was established 
in 1967 by Abbott Laboratories, is 
presented for outstanding contribu¬ 
tions in the field of arthropod-borne 
viruses. Dr. Richard M. Taylor, the 
first recipient of the award, was for 
many years on the staff of the Inter¬ 
national Health Division of the 
Rockefeller Foundation. On retire¬ 
ment, he was instrumental in estab¬ 
lishing a research unit at Yale and a 
similar activity at the University of 
California at Berkeley. 

Dr. Casals, a native of Spain and a 
graduate of the Medical School of 
the University of Barcelona, came to 
the United States in 1936 as a visiting 
investigator at the Rockefeller Insti¬ 
tute. Except for two years in the De¬ 
partment of Pathology at the Cornell 
Medical College, he served with the 
Rockefeller Institute until 1952 when 
he became a staff member of the 
Rockefeller Foundation Virus Labo¬ 
ratories. He was appointed to the 
Yale faculty when the laboratories 
moved to New Haven. 

A prolific author in the field of vi- 
rological serology, Dr. Casals has 
done extensive research on tick- 
borne viruses and other ungrouped 
arborviruses. 

Rogowski Memorial Lecture 
Inaugurated 

Dr. F. Houston Merritt, dean of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Columbia University and profes¬ 
sor of neurology, delivered the first 
Bernard A. Rogowski Memorial Lec¬ 
ture on October 29. The subject was 
“The Treatment of Parkinsonism 
with L-DOPA.” 

The Rogowski Memorial lecture¬ 
ship has been endowed by friends 
and colleagues of the late Dr. Ber¬ 
nard A. Rogowski, who at the time 
of his death in 1967 was associate 
clinical professor emeritus of neu¬ 
rology. A graduate of Yale College 
in 1920 and of the Yale School of 
Medicine in 1924, he had practiced 


neurology and psychiatry in New 
York since 1928. 

Two Join School of Nursing 
In Expanded Program 

Eileen G. Hasselmeyer, noted au¬ 
thority in the field of perinatal and 
pediatric nursing, has been appoint¬ 
ed Annie W. Goodrich Professor of 
Nursing, and Audrey McCluskey, 
formerly of the Cornell School of 
Nursing, has joined the faculty of the 
Yale School of Nursing as associate 
professor in charge of a new pro¬ 
gram in public health nursing. 

Public health nursing is the third 
specialty program to be developed in 
recent years at the school, the other 
two being psychiatric nursing, and 
maternal and newborn health care. 

Professor Hasselmeyer is on leave 
from her post as acting director of 
the Perinatal Biology and Infant 
Mortality Branch of the National In¬ 
stitute of Child Health and Human 
Development (NICHD) and holds the 
rank of Nurse Director in the United 
States Public Health Service Com¬ 
missioned Nurse Corps. She has 
been associated with the Children’s 
Medical Service of Bellevue Medical 
Center and with the Division of 
Nursing Resources of the USPHS. 
Throughout her career, Miss Hassel¬ 
meyer has been concerned with pe¬ 
diatric metabolism and nutrition and 
the behavior and well-being of pre¬ 
mature infants. During her stay in 
New Haven, in addition to lecturing, 
she will work with personnel at the 
newly opened fetal intensive care 
unit in the Yale-New Haven Medical 
Center and will continue research 
into the scientific foundations of 
perinatal nursing. 

Miss McCluskey has specialized in 
nursing education and nursing ser¬ 
vice. In addition to teaching at the 
Cornell-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, she was also director of 
the hospital's maternity and gyne¬ 
cologic service. She has been asso¬ 
ciated with the National League for 
Nursing and the Visiting Nurse Ser¬ 
vice of New York, and was assistant 


27 


director of the Visiting Nurse Asso¬ 
ciation of New Haven when she as¬ 
sumed her present post. She is co¬ 
author of a widely used textbook, 
Medical-Surgical Nursing, which has 
been translated into several foreign 
languages and is a principal educa¬ 
tional resource for nurses in many 
countries. 

A New Look to Genetics 

The Departments of Medicine and 
Pediatrics have combined forces to 
organize a Division of Genetics em¬ 
bracing all ages from the fetus to old 
age. This section, which is under the 
direction of Dr. Leon E. Rosenberg, 
associate professor of pediatrics and 
medicine, includes pediatricians and 
internists whose interests comprise 
the detection of abnormal chromo¬ 
somal patterns, screening for inher¬ 
ited defects, and the biochemical and 
physiological investigation of the na¬ 
ture of these defects. 

A number of important research 
projects are now under way, includ¬ 
ing evaluation of the chromosome 
pattern of all babies born in the Yale- 
New Haven Hospital during the past 
year, a project being undertaken by 
Drs. Herbert A. Lubs and Francis H. 
Ruddle; investigation of the nature 
of the transport defects in renal gly¬ 
cosuria and in the amino acid ureas; 
a study in the isolated cells of tissue 
culture from patients of the nature of 
the biochemical defect in diseases in¬ 
volving the intermediary metabolism 
of amino acids and purines. In addi¬ 
tion, the group staffs a clinic for pa¬ 
tients with genetic diseases and 
offers counselling. 

Both in its spread of interest and in 
the range of age of the patients it 
serves, this group is virtually unique 
in American academic medical in¬ 
stitutions. 

Grover Powers Day Planned 

An all-day program at the School of 
Medicine on Wednesday, March 26, 
will honor the memory of the late 
Dr. Grover F. Powers, professor 
emeritus of pediatrics, who died last 
April. All alumni and faculty mem¬ 


bers and many colleagues and 
friends of Dr. Powers are being in¬ 
vited to attend the event which will 
include presentation of the Grover F. 
Powers Lecture by Dr. Charles U. 
Lowe (Yale M.D. ’45] of the National 
Institutes of Health. Other speakers 
will include Dr. Harry S. Gordon, 
dean of the Albert Einstein College 
of Medicine, and Dr. Myron E. Weg- 
man (Yale M.D. '32), dean of the 
School of Public Health at the Uni¬ 
versity of Michigan. 


comparatively short length—57 
pages—would indicate. Dr. Lidz ha 
described his purpose as being “t 
provide medical students with 
guide for learning about the person 
who will be their patients,” and add 
that he hopes the book ‘‘may be o 
value to persons who are simply in 
terested in the proper study of man 
kind.” 

In a time of medical specialization 
when the need for interdisciplinary 
and cross-cultural exchanges is ae 


Dr. David E. Rogers, Dean of the Johns 
Hopkins University School of Medicine, 
spoke on staphylococcal diseases in the 
Fitkin Amphitheater in December when he 
came to the medical school as Paul B. 
Beeson Visiting Professor of Medicine. 
House staff, students, and medical faculty 
also had the opportunity to meet informally 
with Dr. Rogers. The Beeson Professorship, 
honoring the former chairman of the 
Department of Medicine, was established 
to enable distinguished physicians to spend 
several days at the Yale-New Haven 
Medical Center. 



Mental Health Center Dedication 
Talks Available 

“The University and Community 
Mental Health” is a published col¬ 
lection of the papers delivered at 
the dedication of the Connecticut 
Mental Health Center on September 
30 and October 1, 1966. A limited 
supply of copies is available free on 
a first-come first-served basis. Re¬ 
quests should be addressed to Mrs. 
Ruth Backes, Office of Public Rela¬ 
tions, Connecticut Mental Health 
Center, 34 Park Street, New Haven, 
Connecticut 06508. 

New Books 

THE PERSON: HIS DEVELOPMENT 
THROUGHOUT THE LIFE CYCLE 
by Dr. Theodore Lidz, professor and 
chairman of the Department of Psy¬ 
chiatry (Basic Books). The scope of 
this volume is far greater than its 


great as at any previous period, this 
examination “of the nature of human ! 
nature” will also serve as a valuable j 
resource for students of clinical and 
social psychology, for nurses, social 1 
workers, attorneys, and other coun¬ 
selors. 

The Person treats man in the total 
context of his biological and cultural 
inheritance — as individual, member 
of a family, and member of society , 
— and it describes his development : 
from infancy to old age. Dr. Lidz ; 
draws on the insights of dynamic 
psychiatry and psychoanalysis, the 
cognitive theories of Jean Piaget, and 
the evidence of the biological and be¬ 
havioral sciences, yet Dr. George i 
Krupp, writing in the November Sat- ; 
urday Review, describes the results 
as being for the most part “free of I 
professional jargon and narrow, doc¬ 
trinaire thinking.” 


28 












Professor Lidz, he continues, “nev¬ 
er permits theory to take precedence 
over existence; he is keenly aware 
of the vast range of patterns of hu¬ 
man behavior, reflecting as they do 
individual adaptations to physical, 
biological and cultural circum¬ 
stances . . . Abhorring reductionism, 
Professor Lidz stresses the crucial 
importance of early life experiences 
in shaping the individual’s unique 
destiny but places equal stress on the 
importance of later experiences . . . 
[He] takes a consistently calm, reas¬ 
suring and judicial approach to hu¬ 
man development.” 

THE FIRSTBORN: EXPERIENCES 
□F EIGHT AMERICAN FAMILIES 
by Dr. Milton J. E. Senn, Sterling 
Professor of Pediatrics and Psychia¬ 
try, and Claire Hartford, former as¬ 
sociate in research at the Child Study 
Center (Harvard University Press). 
In this engrossing book on family 
dynamics, Dr. Senn and Mrs. Hart- 
ord have examined with great care 
he major forces that are in opera- 
ion in the emergence of family re¬ 
ciprocal values. The effect of the 
ntroduction of a firstborn on the 
'amily is scrutinized in all its vari- 
ibles ■—child and father, child and 
mother, and mother and father in re- 
ation to their neonate. 

This study, undertaken with fi- 
lancial assistance from the Com¬ 
monwealth Fund and with technical 
issistance from the Child Study Cen- 
er staff, sets out its general area of 
liscussion in the initial chapters and 
cresents summaries and conclusions 
n the final ones. The main body of 
he volume is a comparative study of 
he lives of eight New Haven fami- 
ies, a lengthy chapter being devoted 
o each. Material includes their en- 
dronments — the financial, social, 
ind cultural influences — from a pe- 
iod predating the birth of the child 
o the time when the offspring 
eaches the age of two. The family 
jatterns and ideals are kaleidoscopic 
n nature — the same elements 
Tanging, merging, and emerging to 
leal with circumstances and devel¬ 


oping abilities. The book presents a 
lucid and interesting view of matura¬ 
tion on several levels. It is well worth 
picking up and very difficult to put 
down. 

THE DOCTOR AND THE ATHLETE 
by Isao Hirata, Jr., M.D., clinical as¬ 
sociate in surgery and surgeon in 
chief at the Department of Univer¬ 
sity Health (J. P. Lippincott Com¬ 
pany). Twelve years of experience 
as team physician for intercollegiate 
athletics at Yale has given Dr. Hirata 
ample opportunity to consider the 
problem of disabilities incurred in 
contact sports, their treatment and 
their prevention. 

The first half of the book deals 
with broad guidelines on condition¬ 
ing, diet, and equipment plus general 
medical principles which distinguish 
the problems facing the physician on 
the field from those of the clinical 
physician. Starting with the basic 
premise that “no athlete can be per¬ 
mitted to risk permanent aggravation 
of existing disability whatever the 
circumstances,” Dr. Hirata discusses 
the quick judgments that must be 
made at the time of injury in the 
face of exerted outside pressures. 
The remaining half of the book cov¬ 
ers specific injuries and treatment. 

Several carefully worked ortho¬ 
pedic drawings which illustrate par¬ 
ticular material in the text have been 
executed by the author. 

With the increasing interest in 
physical fitness and team sports 
both in secondary schools and in col¬ 
leges, much of the information out¬ 
lined in this book might be read with 
great benefit by doctors, coaches, and 
team members. 

PRIMITIVE NERVOUS SYSTEMS 
by Thomas L. Lentz, assistant pro¬ 
fessor of anatomy (Yale University 
Press). Dr. Lentz offers a careful in¬ 
vestigation into evolutionary biology 
with particular reference to the ori¬ 
gin and nature of the primitive nerve 
cell and the primitive nervous sys¬ 
tem. In response to recent findings in 
neurophysiology and electrophysiol¬ 
ogy, the author has examined the 


structure and functional character¬ 
istics of nerve cells and systems of 
the lowest order of invertebrates in 
an effort to clarify basic mechan¬ 
isms. The result is a new hypothesis 
to explain how the primitive nerve 
cell arose, the nature of the primitive 
nervous system, and its subsequent 
evolution. The text is enhanced by 
over twenty drawings showing de¬ 
tails of cell structure and by an ex¬ 
tensive list of references for further 
study. 

REVOLUTIONARY IMMORTAL¬ 
ITY: MAO TSE-TUNG AND THE 
CHINESE CULTURAL REVOLU¬ 
TION by Robert Jay Lifton, profes¬ 
sor of psychiatry (Random House). 
The vision of the revolutionary and 
the means he uses to attain that vi¬ 
sion are as complex and difficult to 
assess as the human mind and the 
course of human history. One ap¬ 
proach is that of the psychohisto¬ 
rian, whose discipline permits him 
to study the relationship between 
individual psychology and historical 
change. Robert Jay Lifton, in an anal¬ 
ysis of Mao Tse-tung and the Chi¬ 
nese revolution, has undertaken such 
an approach with results that have 
been hailed as brilliant. 

Eliot Fremont-Smith, writing in 
the New York Times of October 30, 
1968, describes Professor Lifton's 
latest work (he has also written 
Death in Life: Survivors of Hiro¬ 
shima, 1968, and Thought Reform 
and the Psychology of Totalism: A 
Study of "Brainwashing” in China, 
1963) as “one of the year’s most im¬ 
portant.” It is, he says, “an essential 
study of Communist China; more 
than that, it is an original, intellectu¬ 
ally exciting, gracefully written and 
wholly accessible essay on an aspect 
of human individual and mass psy¬ 
chology as it operates in contempo¬ 
rary revolutionary circumstances 
around the world.” 

Equally enthusiastic, John K. Fair- 
bank, Director of the East Asian Re¬ 
search Center at Harvard, calls the 
book “a brilliant study, without peer 
in the copious China literature. 
Whether it results from Lifton’s be- 


29 


ing so well trained or from his being 
merely a genius (probably both), it 
puts much-studied events in a new 
framework of psychological inter¬ 
pretation.” 

In discussing the contribution of 
psycho-history Dr. Fairbank asks, 
‘‘Does it require a psychiatrist to tell 
us that Mao the dictator has gone off 
the deep end and his people are be¬ 
coming fed up with him? On the 
whole, I think the answer is yes. We 
do need the insights of professional 
psychology to develop and sophisti¬ 
cate our everyday common-sense im¬ 
pression. The picture revealed by the 
psycho-historian is not unfamiliar to 
us in outline, but it is much sharper 
in focus, more specific and more re¬ 
liable.” 



This is an electron micrograph of a biological 
interference filter that causes a colored 
reflection originating deep in butterfly eyes. 
The micrograph, which was the cover picture 
on the November 15, 1968, issue of Science, 
is from the research of Dr. William H. Miller, 
associate professor of physiology, and Dr. 
Gary D. Bernard, assistant professor of 
opththalmology and engineering. The issue 
included an article entitled "The Optics of 
Insect Eyes" contributed by Drs. Miller and 
Bernard, along with /. L. Allen, a group leader 
at Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 


Stanley Huntington Davis, Jr. 

The Yale medical community mourns 
the loss of a beloved friend and a 
key member of the administrative 
staff. Stanley H. Davis, Jr., associate 
comptroller for medical affairs, died 
on December 11th at the age of 48. 
He had guided the fiscal course of 
the School of Medicine for eighteen 


Mr Davis 

years, serving with steadfast loyalty 
under Deans Long, Lippard, and Red- 
lich. 

Mr. Davis was born in Everett, 
Massachusetts. He attended the Bos¬ 
ton Latin School and graduated from 
Boston College in 1943. During 
World War II, he served with the Air 
Force. He received his M.A. degree 
from Columbia University in 1946. 

Prior to joining the staff of the 
Yale Treasurer’s Office in 1947, he 
was associated with the Office of 
Naval Research in New York City. 
In 1950 Mr. Davis was appointed 
business manager of the Yale School 
of Medicine, and in 1965, was pro¬ 
moted to the newly created position 
of associate comptroller for medical 
affairs. 

In spite of the difficult and de¬ 
manding tasks which Stan faced 
daily, he was always ready and will¬ 
ing to assist members of the faculty 
and administrative staff with prob¬ 
lems large and small. He continuous¬ 
ly searched for ways to stretch the 
financial resources of the school. He 
cared, and because he cared, he con¬ 
tributed immeasurably to the growth 
and stability of Yale’s program of 
medical education and research. 

Although Stan worked tirelessly 
and seemed to thrive on complicated 
budgets and complex financial prob¬ 
lems, he enjoyed life. He was active 
in community and civic affairs and 
was a member and past-president of 
the Civitan Club and a trustee of the 
Connecticut Division, American Can¬ 
cer Society. He played tennis, squash, 


and was an enthusiastic sailor, but 
first and foremost, he was devoted to 
his family. He is survived by his 
wife, Pauline Elliott, a son, Gregg, 
and a sister. 

In his memory, the Stanley H. 
Davis Fund for Leukemia Research 
has been established at the School of 
Medicine. 

Henry Eisenberg, M.D. 

Dr. Henry Eisenberg, lecturer in pub¬ 
lic health at Yale and chief of the 
Chronic Disease Control Section of 
the Connecticut State Department of 
Health, died on November 2 at the 

r lit! 

age of 63. 

Dr. Eisenberg, who was born in 
Germany in 1905, came to the United 
States in 1934, having done both un¬ 
dergraduate and graduate work at 
Frederick Wilhelm University in Ber¬ 
lin. He received the B.S. degree in ! 
1925 and the M.D. degree in 1930. 
Before coming to Connecticut he , 

was attached to the chest division, i 

I C3 

Montefiore Hospital, and was Chief 
of the Cardiovascular Disease Sec- ; 

n[ 

tion at Beekman Hospital, both in 1 
New York City. 

During World War II and the years j 
following, he was associated with the | 
U.S. Public Health Service in re- | 
search, clinical, and administrative 
capacities. He took his M.P.H. degree ! 
at Yale in 1957. 

I o 

He is survived by his wife, the for- I 
mer Esther Steinberg, and a daughter. 

1 - 

Nicholas J. Giarman, Ph.D. 

Professor Nicholas J. Giarman, a 
much beloved member of the Depart¬ 
ment of Pharmacology, died on Oc- ! 
tober 10, 1968. At the time of his | 
death Professor Giarman was on sab¬ 
batical leave from Yale with a joint 
appointment in the Departments of j 
Psychiatry and Pharmacology at 
Stanford University in California. 

Born in Albany, New York, he was 
graduated cum laudc from New York 
State College in Albany in 1941 and 
received his Ph.D. in 1948 from the 
Yale Graduate School. 



30 















Before coming to New Haven, Pro¬ 
fessor Giarman was assistant bio¬ 
chemist at the Sterling-Winthrop Re¬ 
search Institute for several years. 
After completing his graduate work, 
he joined the staff of E.I. duPont de 
Nemours Company as chief pharma¬ 
cologist. 

He left the duPont Company in 
1949 to return to Yale as an assistant 
professor of pharmacology. He be¬ 
came an associate professor in 1955 
and was appointed to the rank of 
professor in 1960. 

During the academic year of 1954- 
1955, Professor Giarman served as 
an exchange lecturer at the Univer¬ 
sity of Edinburgh in Scotland. 

He was internationally renowned 
for his work on neurotransmitters 
and the effects of psychotropic drugs 
on the brain and had participated in 
many international symposia. He had 


contributed extensively to scientific 
journals and texts and was the editor 
of Biochemical Pharmacology. 

At a recent meeting of the Board 
of Permanent Officers of the medi¬ 
cal school, its members passed a me¬ 
morial resolution which reads in part: 
“RESOLVED THAT the members of 
the Board of Permanent Officers are 
deeply shocked by the untimely 
death of our esteemed colleague 
Nicholas J. Giarman. Many of us will 
remember him as an outstanding 
teacher, others of us will remember 
him as an accomplished scientist, 
but all of us will miss him . . . Many 
of the junior as well as the senior 
members are better teachers today 
because of (his) vast knowledge of 
pharmacology and because of the 
gentle and understanding way in 
which he taught them to teach . . . He 
brought international credit to him¬ 
self and the university by his scien¬ 
tific accomplishments in neuro- and 
psychopharmacology. The impact of 
the investigations of . . . his graduate 
students and the postdoctorate fel¬ 
lows who came from all parts of the 
world to study with him is profound 
and internationally recognized ... His 
loss will be particularly felt by those 
of us who knew him for the human 
being that he was. He was not only 
keenly intelligent but also a man full 
of compassion and understanding. 
He was gentle yet firm in matters 
that involved integrity and justice. 


Nick Giarman was a man — a really 
great man — and the tragedy of his 
loss will be felt by the members of 
the Board of Permanent Officers and 
by others for years to come.” 

Professor Giarman is survived by 
his parents and his wife, the former 
L. Muriel Schlegel of New Haven, 
and two sons, Scott Nicholas and 
Richard Keith. 

William S. Perham, M.D. 

Dr. William Sidney Perham, associ¬ 
ate clinical professor of orthopedic 
surgery and chief of orthopedic sur¬ 
gery for the Department of Univer¬ 
sity Health, died on August 1, 1968, 
at the age of 62. He was also chief of 
orthopedic surgery at St. Raphael’s 
Hospital. 

Dr. Perham was born in Augusta, 
Maine, in 1905. A graduate of the 
University of Michigan, he received 
his M.D. degree in 1932 from that in¬ 
stitution. He served both his intern¬ 
ship and residency at the University 
Hospital in Ann Arbor and was also 
an instructor on the medical faculty. 

He joined the faculty of the Yale 
School of Medicine in 1937. During 
World War II, he held the rank of 
captain in the U.S. Army and served 
with the 39th General Hospital in the 
Marianas and New Zealand. 

He is survived by his wife, the for¬ 
mer Helen Gross, two sons, and two 
daughters. 


MEDICAL ALUMNI DAY 

SAVE THE DATE 
Saturday, May 24, 1969 


31 








Ob/Gyn Alumni Gather 


I t was with no pain at all that the Department of Ob¬ 
stetrics and Gynecology gave birth — and life — to 
a new kind of alumni reunion. Former members of the 
house staff, local practitioners and members of the 
faculty and their wives convened for a whirlwind two- 
day program of activities, both professional and social. 

Invitees came from Winston-Salem and Seattle, from 
Ontario and Glendale and cities in between to view 
new facilities, discuss new findings, and see old friends. 

First on the morning agenda of Friday, October 18, 
was a tour of the hospital facilities, including the new¬ 
born special care unit, the fetal intensive care unit 
and the department seminar room with its closed cir¬ 
cuit television equipment for viewing operative tech¬ 
niques. 

A break for a buffet luncheon in the Laboratory of 
Clinical Investigation was followed by an afternoon of 


scientific sessions led by Drs. Edward Quilligan, John 
Morris, and Nathan Kase from the Yale faculty and by 
Drs. Raymond Vande Wiele, Walter Herrmann and 
Philip Sarrell, invited guest speakers. Wives, mean¬ 
while, were expeditiously transported across campus 
by bus to Yale's art gallery and rare book library in a 
planned tour. 

Participants and wives met once again for cocktails 
and dinner at the New Haven Country Club at a gala 
party for eighty-seven. 

Saturday morning sessions were led by Drs. C. Lee 
Buxton and Clarence Davis and capped by a luncheon 
at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Buxton in Hamden. There, 
the reunion was officially concluded though many of 
its members went on to attend the Yale-Columbia game. 

Prognosis for a repeat in the near future: highly likely. 



East and West meet as former Ob Gyn house staff members 
convened. Dr. Stanley Zerne, '59, of Glendale talks with Dr. Gilles 
Hurteau, '61, of Ontario and Dr. Ernest Kohorn, '66, of New 
Haven 



Enjoying the buffet luncheon on the roof garden at the 
Laboratory of Clinical Investigation: (Above leftI Dr. George 
Couch, '59, Watertown, New York; Dr. Richard Banficld, Jr., '57, 
Stamford, Connecticut; Mrs. Couch; and Mrs. Robert Miller, 
Paramus, New Jersey, whose husband's house staff class is ’58. 

(BelowI Dr. John Mutterperl, '63, Danvers, Massachusetts; Dr. 
Stewart Stringfellow, '62, Guilford, Connecticut; and Dr. Eerenc 
Husvet, '64, Winsted, Connecticut. Visible behind them is Helen 
Kelly, nursing supervisor for labor and delivery, who is well 
known to many generations of Ob/Gyn house staff at the 
Yale-New Haven Hospital 




















Alumni News 


1892 

We reproduce in full a letter recently 
received from J. HENRY SPEAR and 
addressed to Dean Redlich: “Thank 
you and every one in your office for 
the ‘Yale Medicines’ which I re¬ 
ceived this morning. It is very kind 
and thoughtful of you. I shall derive 
much pleasure in reading them. I un¬ 
derstand that I am the only living 
member of the Class of 1892, Yale 
Medical School. I am in my 98th 
year, shall be 98 next August. My 
best wishes for the coming holiday 
season.” Dr. Spear is at the Fanny 
Crosby Home, 1088 Fairfield Avenue, 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 06605. 

1922 

CHESTER E. HURWITZ, in the prac¬ 
tice of ophthalmology, has moved his 
office to 3701 Clarks Lane, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21215. 

1925 

THOMAS FRANCIS, JR. delivered 
the Ludwig Aschoff Memorial Lec¬ 
ture at a meeting of the Freiburg 
Medical Society in Freiburg, Ger¬ 
many, this summer. The subject of 
his lecture was “Factors Affecting 
Immunity to Viral Respiratory Dis¬ 
eases.” In conjunction with his lec¬ 
ture, Dr. Francis was awarded an 
honorary degree of Doctor of Medi¬ 
cine by the faculty of medicine of 
Freiburg. The award cited his contri¬ 
butions in the held of respiratory dis¬ 
ease with particular mention of his 
investigation of influenza. Dr. Fran¬ 
cis is on the faculty of the School of 
Public Health at the University of 
Michigan. 

1930 

j. ROSWELL GALLAGHER, clinical 
professor of pediatrics at Yale, was 
recently appointed to the National 
Advisory Committee on Dyslexia 
and Related Reading Disorders by 
Secretary of Health, Education, and 
Welfare Wilbur f. Cohen. As former 
chief of the adolescents’ unit of the 
Children’s Hospital Medical Center 
of Boston, Dr. Gallagher has long 
been concerned with the medical and 
psychological disorders related to 
learning skills. 

1931 

YALE DAVID KOSKOFF, chief of 
the Department of Neurosurgery at 


Montefiore Hospital in Pittsburgh, 
has co-authored a book with Richard 
Goldhurst entitled The Dark Side of 
the House, published by Dial Press. 
The authors dramatically chronicle 
the case history of Millard Wright, a 
long-time burglar who became a pa¬ 
tient of Dr. Koskoff’s when the sur¬ 
geon agreed to perform a frontal 
lobotomy on him in an effort to sub¬ 
stitute “anatomical loss for a be¬ 
havioral gain.” It is effective in 
detailing both doctor and patient’s 
confrontation with the press, the 
law, medical colleagues, and society 
as well as the growing interdepen¬ 
dence between doctor and patient- 
criminal from their pre-operative 
relationship to Wright’s ultimate 
post-operative suicide. 

1938 

N. WILLIAM WAWRO received the 
highest award of the Connecticut Di¬ 
vision, American Cancer Society, at 
their annual meeting this fall. He was 
presented with a bronze medal and 
an accompanying citation for his 
many contributions to cancer con¬ 
trol. Dr. Wawro is currently senior 
surgeon at Hartford Hospital and 
consultant to a number of other 
Connecticut hospitals including the 
Newington Veterans Hospital, the 
Litchfield County Hospital, the Nor¬ 
walk Hospital, the Institute of Living 
and St. Francis Hospital in Hartford. 

He is a member and former presi¬ 
dent of the New England Cancer 
Society and of the Connecticut Divi¬ 
sion, American Cancer Society, and 
a medical delegate to the Society's 
House of Delegates. In addition, he is 
vice-president of the New England 



Surgical Society and a member of 
several professional organizations 
including the Connecticut Society of 
American Board Surgeons, the Hart¬ 
ford Medical Society, the Hartford 
County Medical Society and the So¬ 
ciety of Head and Neck Surgeons. 

1941 

SOPHIA CHAMBERLIN ALWAY 
and her husband, Dr. Robert H. Al- 
way, of Portola Valley, California, 
hosted a gathering of Bay Area Yale 
alumni at their home in November. 
JOSEPH P. CARSON, JR., was among 
those present to hear Robert L. Hart 
of the Medical School Development 
Office discuss the Alumni In Medi¬ 
cine Campaign. 

1942 

CHARLES F. SCHOLHAMER has a 
son by the same name in the present 
first-year medical class at Yale. Ac¬ 
cording to Dr. Scholhamer, when the 
class was asked at the beginning of 
the year to present their microscopes 
to be checked over, Charles, Jr., 
brought in the scope his dad had 
used in medical school thirty years 
ago. And it turned out that one of 
young Charles’ classmates, Ruth La- 
sell, had a microscope that had been 
to Yale at about the same time with 
her father, SIDNEY LASELL (’41). 

1943 

ROBERT F. BRADLEY has joined 
the faculty of the Harvard Medical 
School as assistant clinical professor 
of medicine. Dr. Bradley is also a staff 
physician at the New England Dea¬ 
coness Hospital and the Joslin Clinic, 
and is currently secretary of the As¬ 
sociation of Yale Alumni in Medicine. 
His home address is 19 Falmouth 
Road, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 
02181. 

Distance being no deterrent for 
him, the month of September found 
ROCKO FASANELLA participating 
at a meeting in Johannesburg. At the 
first South African International 
Ophthalmological Meeting, he joined 
in a session on anterior segment sur¬ 
gery. In October Dr. Fasanella spoke 
at the Los Angeles Society of Oph¬ 
thalmology, and presented two 
courses at the American Academy 
of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngol¬ 
ogy in Chicago. November yielded an 
address before the annual meeting 


33 



of the Nova Scotia Society of Oph¬ 
thalmology and Otolaryngology in 
Halifax. 

1943 March 

LYCURGUS MICHAEL DAVEY has 
been promoted to associate clinical 
professor of neurological surgery on 
the faculty of the Yale School of 
Medicine. 

1944 

ROBERT E. COOKE is editor of The 
Biologic Basis of Pediatric Practice, 
a compendium of information in the 
field of pediatrics. It is published by 
the Blakiston Division of McGraw- 
Hill and includes contributions from 
more than 140 specialists in the 
broad area of child health and dis¬ 
ease. Emphasis is placed on the in¬ 
teractive aspects of behavior and 
health as well as on the existing dif¬ 
ferences between adults and infants. 
Dr. Cooke is chairman of the Depart¬ 
ment of Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins 
University School of Medicine. 

1949 

WILLIAM G. ANLYAN has been 
elected chairman of the council of 
deans of the Association of Ameri¬ 
can Medical Colleges. The council 
deals with developments affecting 
the top level of administration in 
medical schools. Dr. Anlyan, a pro¬ 
fessor of surgery, was named dean 
of the medical school at Duke Uni¬ 
versity in 1964. 

GORDON D. JENSEN is head of the 
Regional Primate Center at the Uni¬ 
versity of Washington. His picture 
recently appeared in a national med¬ 
ical journal together with other inter¬ 
ested doctors, admiring some rare 
offspring under their care—newborn 
orangutan twins. 

1953 

REX B. CONN, JR. has been named 
to head the newly reorganized de¬ 
partment of laboratory medicine at 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He has 
also received an appointment as pro¬ 
fessor of laboratory medicine in a 
recently created division of the De¬ 
partment of Pathology. 

In connection with his new ap¬ 
pointment, Dr. Conn will be in charge 
of the hospital’s clinical laborato¬ 
ries with a staff of more than 200 
persons. He also has plans for the 


Dr. Conn 

formation of a school of medical 
technology and a residency training 
program in clinical pathology. 

Before he joined the Johns Hop¬ 
kins medical school, Dr. Conn had 
been professor of pathology and di¬ 
rector of clinical laboratories at the 
West Virginia University Medical 
Center for several years. 

1956 

WILLIAM H. HINDLE, presently on 
the obstetrics-gynecology staff of the 
Straub Clinic in Honolulu, reports 
that he was initiated into the Ameri¬ 
can College of Surgeons, meeting in 
Atlantic City, New Jersey, during 
which proceedings he talked with 
classmate GEORGE GREEN of New 
York City and LOUIS DEL GUER- 
CIO, (’53), of Larchmont, New York. 
Another member of the class of ’53 
was represented more remotely in a 
live cine clinic from Johns Hopkins 
during which VINCENT GOTT, as¬ 
sociate professor, did open heart sur¬ 
gery. Dr. Gott, incidentally, per¬ 
formed the first heart transplant at 
Johns Hopkins. 



A. FREDERICK NORTH, JR. has 
been appointed to the newly created 
post of associate director for ambu¬ 
latory patient services at Children’s 
Hospital in Washington, D.C. In 
addition he will serve as senior at¬ 
tending pediatrician there and as 
associate professor of pediatrics at 
George Washington University 
School of Medicine. Until recently 
Dr. North had been associated with 
the Office of Economic Opportunity 
as senior pediatrician. 

DONALD R. SPERLING has recently j 
been appointed vice-chairman of the i 
Department of Pediatrics at the Uni- ! 
versity of California, Irvine College 
of Medicine. He is also an assistant 
professor. Dr. Sperling has been on 
the faculty at U.C.I. since 1965 and j 
is a specialist in pediatric cardiology, j 
He served his internship at Johns j 
Hopkins and his residency and grad¬ 
uate study at Children's Hospital of 1 
Los Angeles. i 



1957 

WILLIAM L. KISSICK has been ap¬ 
pointed professor and chairman of 
the Department of Community Medi¬ 
cine at the University of Pennsyl¬ 
vania, a new department which will 
be concerned with the sociological 
and economic aspects of the deliv¬ 
ery of medical care. In this capacity, 

Dr. Kissick will be responsible for 
teaching and research in the area of 
community health needs and in this ; 
multi-discipline field, he will lecture 
in both the Wharton School of Fi¬ 
nance and the School of Medicine. 

Dr. Kissick holds four Yale de¬ 
grees. In addition to his B.A. and 
M.D., he earned an M.P.H. in admin- 



34 










istration and a D.P.H. in epidemiology 
and served his internship at the Yale- 
New Haven Medical Center. After a 
residency in social medicine at Mon- 
tefiore Hospital in New York City, he 
joined the President’s Commission 
on Heart Disease, Cancer and Stroke, 
forerunner of the Regional Medical 
Programs, in Washington, D.C. His 
assignments in Washington also in¬ 
volved him in the planning and de¬ 
velopment of comprehensive health 
planning legislation, OEO funding 
for neighborhood health centers and 
health manpower resources. In 1967 
he was appointed executive director 
of the President’s National Advisory 
Commission on Health Facilities. 


1961 



KENNETH A. ARNDT has been ap¬ 
pointed to associate in dermatology 
it Harvard Medical School. He also 
serves as an associate in dermatol¬ 
ogy at Beth Israel Hospital. Dr. Arndt 
ives at 26 Van Roosen Road, Newton 
Dentre, Massachusetts 02159. 

OHN E. FENN has opened an office 
n New Haven in association with 
Donald B. Alderman for the practice 
pf vascular surgery. Their office ad¬ 
dress is 100 York Street. 

1962 

□ LIVER T. DANN has opened an 
office for the practice of psychiatry 
at 58 Trumbull Street in New Haven. 

1963 

AMES G. WEPSIC has been ap- 
aointed research fellow in surgery at 
Tarvard and is associated with the 
Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. 
i/Vepsic lives at 10 Bickford Avenue, 
iloxbury. 



Dr. Grossman, wearing a curta, informal Indian 
garb, inspects Buddhist sculpture at Ajanta 
Caves, Maharashtra, India. 


1965 

WILLIAM GROSSMAN is serving 
his residency at Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital in Boston and will be a fel¬ 
low in cardiology there next year. He 
reports that he and his wife, Melanie, 
have returned from a two-year hitch 
in New Delhi where he served as a 
Peace Corps physician. While in In¬ 
dia, their daughter Jennifer, now two 
years old, was born. With the pass¬ 
age of time she seems to be forget¬ 
ting her Hindi. 

1967 

RALPH G. MAURER completed his 
internship at the Vancouver General 
Hospital last June and is now ser¬ 
ving a residency in psychiatry at the 
Stanford University Medical Center 
in Palo Alto, California. 

JOSEPH F. WALTER, a lieutenant in 
the Naval Reserve, writes: “I am cur¬ 
rently on active duty with the U.S. 
Navy as a destroyer squadron medi¬ 
cal officer. The job is rather relaxing 
after the hectic days of internship. A 
squadron ‘MO’ has charge of medical 
matters for a group of about six de¬ 
stroyers and presently I’m aboard 
the USS Horne deployed in the west¬ 
ern Pacific, usually in the Gulf of 
Tonkin. The travel is certainly the 
Navy’s distinct advantage. So far 
we’ve been to Hawaii, Guam, the 
Philippines, Japan, Taiwan, Hong 
Kong, Singapore, Australia and Pago 
Pago. We’re home-ported in San 
Diego and hope to return some time 
in late December after a six months’ 
cruise.” 


Public Health 
1927 

LOUIS DE ANGELIS was the recip¬ 
ient of the 1968 Columbus Award. 
Given annually, this award for out¬ 
standing citizenship was presented 
at the Harvest Ball, sponsored by the 
Eastern Connecticut Chapter, Boys’ 
Town of Italy and the Italian-Ameri- 
can Civic Association of New Lon¬ 
don. The citation specifically noted 
Dr. De Angelis’s interest in scouting 
and athletics and his work as school 
physician for the City of New Lon¬ 
don, Connecticut. 

1935 

FRANKLIN M. FOOTE has been ap¬ 
pointed to the Board of Directors of 
the National Conference on Social 
Welfare. He is Commissioner of 
Health of the State of Connecticut 
and president of the Connecticut 
Academy of Preventive Medicine. 

1936 

M. ALLEN POND retired from the 
U.S. Public Health Service in Octo¬ 
ber as Assistant Surgeon General for 
Special Projects. He is now a profes¬ 
sor at the University of Pittsburgh 
School of Public Health and will 
offer a graduate seminar in the poli¬ 
tics of health in January. 

1947 

EDNA MILLER FINBERG, having 
served as writer and dental consul¬ 
tant for four years, has become den¬ 
tal director of the L. W. Frohlich Co., 
Inc., in New York. 

1950 

IDA M. BUCHER and husband, BILL 
BUCHER (M.D. ’50), have five chil¬ 
dren. Sharon is a junior at Smith; 
Katrina, a freshman at Whitman; 
Bill, a junior at Loyola Prep; and 
Patrick and Melina are in grade 
school. Bill continues at Los Angeles 
Childrens Hospital (University of 
Southern California Pediatric De¬ 
partment] and Ida is a consultant to 
the California Head Start program. 

1958 

PHILIP B. HALLEN has been ap¬ 
pointed to the Planning Committee 
of the 1970 White House Conference 
on Children and Youth. He is cur- 


35 


rently president of the Falk Memo¬ 
rial Fund in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

1959 

KENNETH J. WILLIAMS has been 
appointed director of medical affairs 
for the Catholic Hospital Associa¬ 
tion, St. Louis, Missouri, as of Febru¬ 
ary, 1969. At that time he will be in 
charge of hospital-medical staff re¬ 
lations for the association's 900 
health care facilities. 

1964 

LINDA A. GEORGE had an article 
published in the June issue of Social 
Science and Medicine. Her husband, 
ROBERT C. GEORGE (M.D. ’66), is 
a surgeon with the U.S. Air Force at 
Griffith Air Force Base, Rome, New 
York. A daughter, Allison Carr, was 
born to the Georges on June 5. 

1964 

CARTER L. MARSHALL will be an 
associate professor of community 
medicine at the new Mt. Sinai School 
of Medicine in New York City in 
July, 1969. He is currently an assis¬ 
tant professor in the Department of 
Preventive Medicine, University of 


Kansas Medical Center in Kansas 
City. 

1966 

MARIA BIRCH HINCKS, training 
associate for Planned Parenthood of 
New York City, is developing train¬ 
ing programs and in-service educa¬ 
tion for the personnel of all publicly 
funded family planning clinics and 
educational programs under a Ford 
Foundation grant to Planned Parent¬ 
hood. She has been concentrating on 
the training of non-professional com¬ 
munity workers, but is initiating 
some nurses’ training programs. 

1967 

PATRICIA D. MAIL is back in the 
role of fulltime student, having been 
granted a full scholarship in pursuit 
of the Ph.D. degree by the Depart¬ 
ment of Anthropology of the Univer¬ 
sity of Arizona. Her major areas of 
emphasis are physical and cultural 
anthropology, all with an eye to fu¬ 
ture work with the USPHS, Division 
of Indian Health. The course of 
study is expected to cover the next 
three years. Last year she took time 
off from school to try her hand at 


teaching health education in a pri¬ 
vate, coeducational school in Tucson. 
The experience was exciting and re-j 
warding, and more than proved the 
old maxim that “the teacher learns 
from the students.” 

BETH MURPHY received her M.S. 
degree in 1968 from the Harvard 
School of Public Health (Demogra¬ 
phy and Human Ecology). 

HOUSE STAFF 
1946 

LYNN L. JOHNSEN has moved her 
office to 524 Beaumont Road, Fay- j 
etteville, North Carolina 28304 

1967 

A card from RICHARD LILLARD, 
who served in radiology, reports: j 
“Hello from the S.S. HOPE. We are 
in Rotation 4 (of 5) here in Ceylon. 
We each serve two months. The ship 
is anchored in Colombo Harbor. Part J 
of us stay aboard and part of us j 
participate in rounds at the numer¬ 
ous hospitals ashore. Best regards to | 
house officers at Yale and to the 
staff." 


The Nominating Committee Seeks Your Suggestions 

At the Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine annual business meeting to be held on Medical Alumni Day, Saturday, j 
May 24, 1969, the nominating committee will present a slate of officers and four representatives to serve on the execu- j 
tive committee for two-year terms. One of the four executive committee members to be elected will represent former 
house staff and one will represent public health alumni. 

The nominating committee would welcome your suggestions, which may be submitted by letter or on the form below. 


To: The Nominating Committee 

Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 

Room L-200 SHM 

333 Cedar Street 

New Haven, Connecticut 06510 

I would like to submit the following names for your consideration: 


Signed- 

Class or House Staff years 












Panel Discussion: The Medical Center and Social Change 

Dean Redlich will moderate a panel discussion on “The 
Medical Center in an Era of Social Change” at the Yale 
Law School auditorium on February 22 at 2:15 p.m. The 
event is part of the University's Alumni Day program to 
which alumni of the graduate and professional schools 
are invited. 


Picture Credits Kate Swift: cover, pp. 2, 3, 5, 
6 (above), 7, 8 (right), 14, 16, 17 (above), 18, 28; 
Yale University News Bureau: pp. 6 (below), 23, 
24 (right), 25, 31, 33, 34, 35; Mark S. Kierstead: 
p. 8 (left); Joel Katz/Yale Alumni Magazine: p. 9; 
Yale University Art Gallery: p. 19; Yale Medical 
Library: pp. 20, 21; University of Colorado Med¬ 
ical Center: p. 24; William H. Miller, M.D., and 
Gary D. Bernard, M.D. ; p. 30; The Edward Mal- 
ley Company: p. 30; Robert Child: p. 32; George 
Washington University: p. 34; Edward A. Hub¬ 
bard: p. 34; Melanie Grossman: p. 35; Robert 
Perron: p. 11; A. Burton Street: pp. 12, 13. 


YALE MEDICINE 

NON-PROFIT ORC 



U.S. POSTAGE 


333 Cedar Street 

PAID 



New Haven, Conn. 


New Haven, Conn. 06510 

Permit No. 8 





This year the Alumni Executive Committee has decided to have Alumni Day 
in May rather than in June when many people have other commitments. 



Plan now to attend 

Medical Alumni Day Saturday, May 24, 1969 











YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE / SPRING 1969 





COVER: An "electron tree” is a permanent record of the discharge pat¬ 
tern formed by high energy electrons in certain kinds of dielectric solids 
A. G. Agostinelli, radiological physicist in the Department of Radiology, 
created this tree by irradiating a block of lucite with the 6 MeV linear 
accelerator. 


YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE / SPRING 1969 / VOL. 4 NO. 2 


Contents 


A Decade of Radiology at Yale 2 

Nursing Education at Yale: A Progress Report 7 

Trauma Symposium 12 

Doctor of Diverse Distinctions 14 

Internship Appointments 19 

Grover F. Powers Day 20 

In and About Sterling Hall 22 

Alumni News 31 


YALE MEDICINE is published three times a year — in the fall, winter, and 
spring — and is distributed to members of the Association of Yale Alumni in 
Medicine, students, and others interested in the School of Medicine. Com¬ 
munications may be addressed to The Editor, Room L200, 333 Cedar Street, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 06510. 

Editor Arthur Ebbert, Jr., M.D. 

Managing Editor Kate Swift 
Assistant Managing Editor Anne S. Bittker 
Designer Sarah P. Sullivan 
Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 
Benjamin Castleman, M.D., ’31, President 
George A. Carden, II, M.D., '35, Vice-President 
Robert F. Bradley, Jr., M.D., '43, Secretary 
Lawrence K. Pickett, M.D., '44, Past President 

Executive Committee 
Philip S. Brezina, M.D., '40 
William B. Kiesewetter, M.D., '49hs 
Eric W. Mood, M.P.H., '43 
Richard D. Otis, M.D., '49 
Michael A. Puzak, M.D., '42 
Richmond W. Smith, Jr., M.D., '42 




A Decade of Radiology at Yale 


R adiology, the youngest department of the Yale School 
of Medicine, has begun its second decade exhibit¬ 
ing all the vigorous growth and abounding energy of a 
robust ten-year-old. Its healthy condition is attributable 
in large part to the dedication and drive of Dr. Morton 
M. Kligerman, the dynamic and volatile professor of 
radiology who has chaired the department since its 
founding. (Dr. Kligerman is the subject of the Faculty 
Profile, beginning on page 14.) 

Until ten years ago there was no university department 
of radiology at Yale. Radiological services at the Grace- 
New Haven Hospital were performed by staff radiolo¬ 
gists whose academic appointments were in the Depart¬ 
ment of Surgery. These radiologists were deeply involved 
in day-to-day consultation with faculty members in the 
clinical services and with their students and house 
officers, but practically no research was undertaken. 
From the viewpoint of the country’s radiologic com¬ 
munity, Yale was the most backward of any major 
medical school and was severely criticized. 

Morning report from 8:00 to 8:30 when members of the radiotherapy house 
staff meet with Dr. Kligerman to discuss newly admitted patients and 
problem cases. 


In 1958, a study by an ad hoc committee appointed b 
President A. Whitney Griswold on the recommendatioi 
of Dean Vernon W. Lippard revealed the need for ai 
academic Department of Radiology. For Dr. Kligerman 
who was brought from Columbia University’s College o 
Physicians and Surgeons to organize and head the nev 
department, it was a splendid opportunity to achieve th< 
goals he visualized for such an academic unit. Thest 
goals were and are today: first, to give excellent patien 
care (there is no place in the department, the chairmar 
states, for clinicians who are not interested in patients) 
second, to provide expert teaching in all aspects of radi 
ology; and third, to make the very best research contri¬ 
butions in the field of radiology. 

The growth of the department can be seen in man}, 
ways. During the first decade the faculty has increased 
from ten members to forty-two. The diagnostic section 
now examines annually two and one half times the num¬ 
ber of patients that it did before the department was es¬ 
tablished. The number of patients cared for in the radio- 



2 









therapy section has tripled, and the section of nuclear 
medicine has increased its activities five fold. However, 
an academic department cannot be distinguished for su¬ 
perior service alone. Many good non-university hospitals 
provide excellent service daily. The distinguishing mark 
of a university faculty is its effectiveness in teaching and 
research. 

Before 1958, although the radiology service at the 
Grace-New Haven Hospital was not a university depart¬ 
ment, it carried a fine tradition in teaching. With the 
founding of the department, the basic teaching program 
was continued and strengthened, and instruction in large 
classrooms was replaced by small seminar and clerkship 
groups. In this regard the diagnostic section has been 
particularly successful, offering programs of such inter¬ 
est that almost every medical student takes at least one 
elective in radiology during his medical course. 

During the past ten years, the department has prepared 
faculty members for numerous medical schools as well 
as radiologists who are now serving in hospitals and in 
private and group practices throughout the country. 
Among those who trained in the department or came to 
it directly from residency for their initial professional 
service are Dr. James H. Scatliff, chairman of radiology 
at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine; 
Dr. Gerald Scanlon, head of diagnostic radiology at Mar¬ 
quette University School of Medicine; Dr. Samuel Hell- 
man, director of Harvard Medical School’s Joint Center 
for Radiation Therapy; Dr. Carl F. von Essen, who has 
been appointed professor of radiotherapy at the Univer¬ 
sity of California School of Medicine at San Diego; and 
Dr. Stanley E. Order, who will head the radiotherapy 
program at Brown University. 

The most significant change which departmental status 
achieved for radiology at Yale was to permit the develop¬ 
ment of a major research effort. In October of 1958, the 
new department had less than 500 feet of research space 
and a budget of less than $5,000 per year for research. 
The department now has research support totaling more 
than $1 million a year and its research laboratories oc¬ 
cupy some 18,000 square feet of space. Dr. Kligerman is 
quick to point out that quantities of money and space are 
not valid measures of success in research. Rather, suc¬ 
cess is measured by the development of well conceived 
questions and well planned experiments to produce an¬ 
swers of significance for medical science. 

The radiology chairman recognizes that each individ¬ 
ual selects his area of special interest because of his 
own particular make-up. The failure of radiologists in 
the past to contribute significantly in the research area 
has denied medical science, and ultimately the public, 


certain kinds of information: answers to questions that 
only the radiologist thinks of and only the radiologist 
solves in his unique way. Throughout this country and 
abroad, research efforts of high quality in radiology de¬ 
partments have been sparse and have failed to utilize 
sufficiently modern techniques of biology to explore 
fundamental questions. The goal at Yale was to create a 
radiology department without such limitations. 

Through the good offices of the late Dr. Milton Winter- 
nitz, as well as the efforts of Dr. Levin Waters, an initial 
grant for establishing a radiobiology unit was obtained 
from the Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical 
Research, and Dr. Paul Howard-Flanders of Hammer¬ 
smith Hospital, London, was invited to head the new 
section. In addition, a program-project grant for a radio¬ 
therapy research center was obtained from the National 
Cancer Institute. This has permitted the development of 
a program in laboratory research and has also made pos¬ 
sible the establishment of a clinical investigative re¬ 
search unit in radiotherapy. Because of space limitations 
in the hospital, beds for this unit are not yet located in 
one area; patients are placed either in the Winchester 
Building or in the general clinical research center on the 
fifth floor of the Hunter Building. 

A training program in cancer research and radiother¬ 
apy was also instituted through a grant from the National 
Cancer Institute. This four-year program enables post¬ 
doctoral fellows to receive not only full training in clini¬ 
cal investigation but also a minimum of one year in a re¬ 
search laboratory. For the latter training, the radiobiol¬ 
ogy laboratories serve the needs of most fellows; but the 
program, which Dr. Kligerman directs, is designed to 
utilize any other academic unit of the university that is 
equipped to supervise the research effort of a trainee. 
For example, Dr. Byron Waksman, professor and chair¬ 
man of the Department of Microbiology, has supervised 
a trainee who is interested in the important field of im¬ 
munologic aspects of cancer. 

Subsequently, a similar research training program was 
obtained in diagnostic radiology. And with the addition 
of Dr. Richard P. Spencer in 1963 to head the section of 
nuclear medicine, not only did the clinical service flour¬ 
ish but a program was developed in the study of mem¬ 
brane transport, immunology, and the building of models 
to describe biological actions. 

One significant measure of Yale’s standing in radio- 
logic research is represented by the Memorial Award of 
the Association of University Radiologists. This distin¬ 
guished award, which has been given annually for the 
past nine years to the resident or fellow in radiology who 
has submitted the best research paper, has been won 


3 


three times by members of the department at Yale. The 
1969 award, presented this May at the association’s 
meeting in San Francisco, went to Dr. Richard O. Dan- 
ford, a second-year fellow in the diagnostic radiology re¬ 
search training program. 

Five Sections of the Department 

The Department of Radiology is made up of five sec¬ 
tions; they include diagnostic radiology, nuclear medi¬ 
cine, radiation physics, radiation therapy, and radiobi¬ 
ology. 

The Section of Diagnostic Radiology is headed by Dr. 
Solomon S. Schwartz, professor of radiology, who joined 
the faculty this April. One of his first priorities is to es¬ 
tablish an experimental residency training program that 
will be varied in time with residents’ needs, rather than 
conforming to specialty board structural requirements. 



Dr. Spencer does a bone scan on a patient in the Section of NucJear 
Medicine. Activity detected by the radioisotope scanner is recorded on 
magnetic tape. 



In the Section of Diagnostic Radiology. Dr. Schwartz meets regularly witJ| 
residents to review films and case histories. 


4 







[t is felt that such a plan will help to alleviate the nation¬ 
wide shortage of radiologists, and to fully utilize the 
talent of each trainee in his area of special interest. In 
addition, an experimental training program leading to a 
baccalaureate degree in allied health fields is under con¬ 
sideration for both diagnostic and therapeutic radiol¬ 
ogy, so that technologists in the future will be able to 
perform many functions now considered the sacred 
prerogatives of physicians. Further, a critical reap¬ 
praisal of fundamental diagnostic concepts is under 
way to determine whether the radiologist “reads the 
film or the clinical history.” 

With the help of Dr. Robert Shapiro, clinical professor 
of radiology, and Dr. Ralph Littwin, assistant clinical 
professor of radiology, the diagnostic section has under¬ 
taken a program to prepare videotapes for use in con¬ 
junction with the laboratory teaching program of the De¬ 
partment of Anatomy. Radiology faculty members be- 



3r. Howard-Flanders, right, diagrams molecular structure for DNA as he 
alks with Dr. W. Dean Rupp, assistant professor of radiobiology. The 
‘wo men have collaborated on studies of DNA replication and recombina- 
ion after ultraviolet irradiation. 


lieve that functional anatomy can thus be taught in a 
manner that will demonstrate the gross anatomy in its 
living relationships, but will do so in a much shorter time 
than is required by classical dissection methods. The ma¬ 
terial prepared by the Department of Radiology will be 
interdigitated with material in the current program in 
anatomy. By reducing the time required to transmit the 
total volume of information to the students, the method 
will help solve the difficult problem of compressing the 
teaching of the basic sciences without sacrificing the 
amount or quality of the information. 

Plans call for the installation of much new equipment 
in the diagnostic section as funds become available, and 
this will result in improved patient care. However, dur¬ 
ing the past year extensive new facilities have been 
opened in the Dana Clinic building, greatly increasing the 
efficiency of diagnostic services, especially for emer¬ 
gency and out-patient radiography. Six new radiologic 
rooms immediately adjacent to the hospital’s emergency 
room are equipped for neuroradiology and vascular ra¬ 
diology. Rapid processing equipment in these rooms en¬ 
ables film to be developed in 90 seconds. A patient’s 
films can be checked immediately and additional views 
can be taken if needed while he is still in the x-ray room. 
The neuroradiologic suite contains a giant Mimer unit 
from Sweden in which an adult patient can be completely 
somersaulted in order to distribute gas within the ven¬ 
tricular system of the brain for purposes of visualizing 
brain anatomy. The unit represents but one example of 
the generous support that has been received from the 
Fannie E. Rippel Foundation toward the acquisition of 
excellent equipment. 

The Section of Nuclear Medicine has as its principal 
purpose the diagnostic use of radioactive materials. Di¬ 
rected by Dr. Spencer, who is professor of nuclear medi¬ 
cine, the section reflects the academic orientation of the 
rest of the department and its faculty members devote 
half time to clinical responsibilities and half time to re¬ 
search. 

Radioactive isotope uptake studies are provided for 
both inpatients and outpatients, as are scanning proce¬ 
dures of the brain, spleen, placenta, bone, liver, lung, 
kidney, thyroid, and other organs. To help reduce hospi¬ 
tal admissions, the section gives “same day service,” 
with procedures in nearly all cases being performed and 
reported on the patient’s chart the same day they are 
ordered. 

Research in this section has centered on the elucida¬ 
tion of metabolism, growth, and the immune response by 
means of radiotracers. Two analogue computers are be¬ 
ing used not only in the processing of clinical data but in 


5 





constructing and testing models of biological systems for 
the research studies. 

The Radiobiology Section was established in the be¬ 
lief that a research program is necessary for the balanced 
development of a department responsible for teaching 
clinical radiotherapy. Faculty members in this section 
are engaged full-time in research but also contribute to 
teaching on the biological effects of irradiation, molecu¬ 
lar genetics, and related topics. The section is headed by 
Dr. Howard-Flanders, professor of radiobiology and 
molecular biophysics, who is noted for his research elu¬ 
cidating the biochemical mechanisms for the repair of 
chromosomal DNA. 

Underlying the use of x-rays and chemotherapy drugs 
in the treatment of malignant disease are such complex 
subjects as the processes of cellular differentiation, the 
regulation of cell division, the nature of malignancy and 
carcinogenesis, radiation and drug action on cells, and 
many other problems. One of the main areas of investi¬ 
gation in the section involves the cellular mechanisms 
for recovery from radiation damage. As both normal and 
malignant cells are known to recover from radiation 
damage, it appears that a favorable balance in these re¬ 
covery processes may be important to the eradication of 
tumor cells without the destruction of surrounding nor¬ 
mal tissue. An insight into the recovery mechanisms has 
been obtained through the investigation of radiation 
damage due to ultraviolet light, x-rays, and alkylating 
agents in bacteria. 

Other subjects of research include the mechanisms of 
genetic regulation, transcription, and recombination in 
bacteria and bacterial viruses; the nature of the binding 
forces that hold cells together in organized tissues; and 
drugs that sensitize anoxic tissue culture cells to the ef¬ 
fects of x-irradiation and might, therefore, be useful for 
sensitizing human solid tumors which are frequently 
anoxic. 

The Radiation Therapy Section is headed by Dr. Kliger- 
man, whose main research interest is the study and treat¬ 
ment of cancer through radiation in combination with 
chemicals. This section occupies the Hunter Radiation 
Therapy Center, which was completed and opened soon 
after the Department of Radiology was established in 
1958. The center is named in memory of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward S. Hunter, parents of Robert E. Hunter of Santa 
Barbara, California, a Yale alumnus who made a gener¬ 
ous gift toward construction of the building. High voltage 
radiation equipment located in the underground level of 
the center includes a two-million electron volt Van de 
Graaff generator, a six-million electron volt linear accel¬ 
erator installed in 1963, and three units of lesser voltage 


used in treating relatively superficial cancers. It shouhj ' 
be pointed out that seventy per cent of all patients witl 
cancer seen at the Yale-New Haven Medical Center an 
treated in the Hunter Radiation Therapy Center. 

Clinical investigation in radiation therapy include:) 
studies on the use of pre-operative radiation in the treat) 
nrent of lung, rectal, and bladder cancers, and on the 
sequential use of cancer chemotherapeutic agents anc| 
radiotherapy. A noteworthy achievement is the develop ! 
ment of a highly sophisticated technique for treating the, 
pituitary gland and other small volumes of tissue. Thej 
method is dependent on a linear accelerator which was 
altered by the manufacturer on the recommendation oil 
-— and in consultation with — members of the Yale ra-l 
diotherapy staff, and permits the accurate treatment ofj 
portals whose cross-section diameters are as small asj 
0.6 cm. It is of interest that the penumbra, or fuzzy mar¬ 
gin of radiation, around the treatment fields of the “bet¬ 
ter” cobalt therapy units is equal in size to the small 
treatment portals which can only be produced by this 
highly accurate machine at Yale. 

Dr. Kligerman is optimistic about the future of radiol¬ 
ogy at Yale as it begins its second decade, and his 
optimism seems well justified by the department's 
continuing achievements in patient care and its extra-; 
ordinary strides toward the goal of academic excellence. 


6 





Nursing Education at Yale: A Progress Report 


T he dramatic advances in fetal intensive care achieved 
at Yale in recent years were the subject of a special 
postgraduate conference last fall for obstetricians from 
across the country. This spring a similar three-day con¬ 
ference (May 26-28) was presented for nurses. Called 
‘‘A Symposium on the Scientific Foundations of Fetal 
Intensive Care Nursing,” and supported in part by the 
United States Children’s Bureau, it was a collaborative 
undertaking of the Maternal and Newborn Health Nurs¬ 
ing Program of the Yale School of Nursing and the 
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Yale 
School of Medicine. 

Close cooperation in maternity care between the two 
schools is not new. In the 1940's doctors and nurses at 
Yale worked together to develop a program of instruc¬ 
tion for prospective parents and of support for mothers 
during labor and the postpartum period. Originally called 
"prepared childbirth,” it demonstrated that nurses with 
specialized knowledge of obstetrics could improve hos¬ 
pital maternity care and contribute to the education 
of student doctors and nurses. Obvious as it seems 
now, it was a novel idea at the time, at least to 
physicians. 

Today, with the rapid increase in knowledge about 
fetal physiology and the development of new tech¬ 
niques for assessing the health of the unborn child, it 
is essential that obstetricians continue their training 
with postgraduate sessions such as the one Yale offered 
last October. The quick follow-up, after the session for 


physicians, of a similar session for nurses — and the 
recognition this implies of the unique contribution 
made by nurses in fetal intensive care — may be straws 
in the winds of change, and they are being welcomed 
with cautious optimism on the first floor, north wing, 
of Brady Memorial Laboratory, location of the Yale 
School of Nursing. 

Change is long overdue in the cart-before-the-horse 
process that has characterized the education of nurses 
since the beginning of their profession a hundred years 
ago. During this entire period, the curriculum in schools 
of nursing has generally lagged behind changes in nurs¬ 
ing practice. These changes grew, in part, out of sci¬ 
entific advances, but they also came about as a result 
of the continuous transfer from medicine to nursing 
that has been taking place almost from the beginning 
of modern nursing. Nursing has included more and 
more of what was formerly regarded as the prerogative 
of the physician. The transfer of responsibility for per¬ 
forming technical procedures took place on the job, 
usually in the hospital. Sometimes it went almost 
unnoticed; at other times it followed lengthy public 
controversy. But in nearly every case, the skills neces¬ 
sary to take responsibility for a new procedure were 
first taught on the job, and nursing schools incorpo¬ 
rated theory and skills in the new area into their cur- 
riculums some time after the procedure had become 
accepted nursing practice. 

The Yale School of Nursing is trying to reverse this 


Dean Arnstein, left, talks with Donna Diers, director of the School of Nursing research program, about studies in progress on ways nurses can improve 
patient care. 



7 


process. On its founding in 1923, it established a new 
pattern by basing student instruction and experience 
on an educational plan rather than an apprenticeship 
system. Eleven years later, it accorded full professional 
status to nursing by making the bachelor’s degree a 
requirement for admission to the school. Postgraduate 
programs in nursing, originally offered through the 
Yale Graduate School, have been under the aegis of 
the School of Nursing since 1958, at which time the 
school’s basic program of professional preparation for 
nursing was discontinued. Today, students enrolled in 
the school are graduate nurses majoring either in psy¬ 
chiatric or maternity nursing, and majors are now being 
added in public health and pediatric nursing. The two- 
year program of study leads to the degree of Master of 
Science in Nursing. 

Margaret G. Arnstein, former chief of the Division 
of Nursing of the United States Public Health Service, 
succeeded Florence S. Wald as dean of the Yale School 
of Nursing in 1967. Dean Wald had laid the foundation 
for the current expansion of the curriculum, and Dean 
Arnstein is continuing to chart a course for the school 
that anticipates the new responsibilities nurses will 
assume in the foreseeable future. These responsibilities 
stem from the fact that while medicine becomes in¬ 
creasingly specialized, patients continue to need gen¬ 
eral, “whole patient’’ care and continuity of care. To 
help meet these needs, Dean Arnstein is calling for 
“expanded roles” for nurses. 

Such roles now exist only in a few institutions, but 
where they have been given the opportunity, nurses 
with the necessary preparation have justified the 
change in responsibility. Leaders in nursing and a 
growing number of physicians see expanded roles for 
nurses as essential in the health services of the future. 

Clinical nurse specialists, for example, are being pre¬ 
pared in Yale’s psychiatric nursing program, which is 
under the chairmanship of Rhetaugh G. Dumas, asso¬ 
ciate professor of psychiatric nursing. Conducted in 
close cooperation with both the Connecticut Mental 
Health Center and the Yale Psychiatric Institute, the 
program is highly regarded by members of Yale’s De¬ 
partment of Psychiatry, and graduates are functioning 
fully and developing new roles in these two patient 
care facilities. 

Since 1958, Yale has been graduating nurses equipped 
to take responsibility for the care of normal maternity 
patients throughout the entire maternity cycle, including 
delivery. At present, Vera R. Keane, lecturer in maternal 
and newborn health nursing, is acting chairman of this 
program, which enables students to qualify for the Cer- 


The program in maternal and newborn health nursing leads to the 
Certificate of Nurse Midwifery. Here, Sharon L. Schindler, instructor in 
this program, shows newborn infant to the mother in the delivery room. 



8 





tificate of Nurse Midwifery. Beginning in 1967, as a 
result of the efforts of Elizabeth S. Sharp who was then 
chairman, students have been able to experience what 
continuity of care means for the patient and for the 
nurse. This was possible because, for the first time, 
practice in the labor and delivery phases of maternal 
care was available to Yale School of Nursing students 
at the Yale-New Haven Hospital. Prior to 1967, it was 
necessary for students to go to hospitals in other cities 
for this part of their curriculum. 

Although widespread and effective use is made of 
nurse midwives in many European countries — where, 
perhaps not incidentally, maternal and infant mortality 
rates are lower than those in the United States — nurse 
midwifery in this country has been largely limited to iso¬ 
lated rural areas. Certain large urban clinics have 
recently begun to utilize nurse midwives, and they 
have also functioned on an experimental basis in a 
small community hospital in the West. 

This spring a group of obstetricians in New Haven 
has invited a member of the Yale nursing faculty to 
serve on a part-time basis as a nurse midwife to their 
patients. As far as is known, this is the first instance in 
the United States of a nurse midwife joining physicians 
working in private practice. At the same time, a pre¬ 
paid group practice organization, the Community 
Health Care Center Plan, Inc., now being formed in 
New Haven, is including a nurse midwife in its plan. 
The Yale School of Nursing will work closely with 
both these groups to study the acceptance of the nurse 
midwife by people in a variety of situations. 

The new Yale programs for advanced preparation in 
public health nursing and pediatric nursing, like the 
two present specialty programs, will emphasize clinical 
practice and research. This is in keeping with the 
overall objective of the school: to prepare expert nurse 
practitioners who are also equipped to analyze nursing 
practices and their effects on patients with the ulti¬ 
mate aim of testing new nursing methods to improve 
practice. 

The program in public health nursing will include 
theory and practice in assisting individuals and fam¬ 
ilies to deal with their health problems, as well as in 
defining the health problems of a community and in 
assisting the community to overcome them. The various 
community projects with which the university is affili¬ 
ated will give an excellent opportunity to evaluate the 
effectiveness of the methods used. Audrey M. McClus- 
key, recently appointed associate professor of public 
health nursing, is the chairman of this program to 
which the first students will be admitted this fall. 


Graduate student Donna LeBlanc wears her public health nurse’s uniform 
when making a home visit to a patient in her care for maternal and new¬ 
born health nursing. 



9 


The curriculum will include study of individual and 
group motivation, and of the leadership that results in 
constructive action. Identification of leadership in a 
community is crucial to public health work, and the 
public health nurse is in an excellent position to locate 
grass roots leaders or potential leaders. 

Another area of study will be the new roles of nurses 
in the ambulatory services of hospitals and in group 
medical practices. These have been tried out recently 
in several parts of the country, and some have been 
reported in the literature; but almost nothing has been 
reported of the curriculum needed to prepare such prac¬ 
titioners. The Yale School of Nursing will be able to give 
its students practice in expanded roles both in the Yale- 
New Haven Hospital ambulatory services and in the 
Community Health Care Center Plan now being estab¬ 
lished in New Haven. The faculty and students, together 
with the staffs of these services, will study the knowl¬ 
edge and skills nurses need in order to function in the 
new and expanded roles, and the curriculum will be ad¬ 
justed and modified as needed. 

The recent proliferation of knowledge about human 
development and early growth is reflected in the estab¬ 
lishment of the pediatric nursing program, to which 
the first students will be admitted in the fall of 1970. 
This new program will be developed by Katherine 
Buckley Nuckolls, who has been appointed associate 
professor of nursing. In the past, maternal and child 
care have been so closely linked that many nursing 
schools combine them in the same program of study. 
But it is increasingly difficult to teach all the nurse 
must know in the continuum from the mother’s preg¬ 
nancy through the child’s adolescence. Care of the 
fetus and the newborn, for example, are just two of 
the areas in which the application of research findings 
is burgeoning. In this connection, the school is cur¬ 
rently privileged to have, as Annie W. Goodrich Visit¬ 
ing Professor of Nursing, Eileen G. Hasselmeyer, who 
was responsible for initiating the recent symposium 
on fetal intensive care nursing. Dr. Hasselmeyer, who 
is director of the Perinatal Biology and Infant Mor¬ 
tality Branch of the National Institute of Child Health 
and Human Development, is doing research at Yale on 
the scientific foundations of perinatal nursing. 

In addition to the work being done in fetalogy, other 
Yale assets that will enhance the program in pediatric 
nursing include the outstanding work in child psychi¬ 
atry being done by the Child Study Center and the 
advances in newborn special care being achieved by 
the Department of Pediatrics. The chairman and several 
members of the pediatrics faculty are already working 


The psychiatric nursing program prepares dinical nurse specialists in 
mental health. Here. Marvel Davis, a graduate student in this program, 
works with a psychiatric patient. 



10 







closely with the nursing faculty to strengthen the new¬ 
born component of the present maternal and newborn 
health nursing program. 

Dean Arnstein points out that the pediatric program 
would be especially suitable for joint education of 
students in the medical and nursing disciplines. If the 
physician is to accept an expanded role for the nurse, 
he must understand it. There is no better way to grasp 
a fellow worker’s abilities and limitations than to 
struggle together as fellow students. 

The school is also studying the use of the clinical 
nurse specialist on the inpatient unit, a role that is 
being utilized more widely around the country than 
are those in the ambulatory services, but is still in the 
early stages of development. In order to develop it 
further and define the relationships of the clinical 
nurse specialist to other individuals and groups con¬ 
cerned with inpatient care, the United States Public 
Health Service is supporting the study being undertaken 
at Yale with Jean Barrett, assistant dean and professor 
of nursing, as the chief investigator. 

The establishment of the new programs still leaves 
one serious gap in the curriculum — medical-surgical 
nursing — and Yale is now seeking funds to initiate 
such a program. Specialists in this field can have the 
greatest impact on nursing service in hospitals since 
the largest number of patients come under the medical 
and surgical classifications. The school, with the ex¬ 
tensive resources of Yale University and the Yale-New 
Haven Medical Center, is in an advantageous position 
to make a contribution through research and the ap¬ 
plication of research findings. 

The nursing school’s research program, directed by 
Donna Diers, assistant professor of nursing, places first 
priority on developing studies to determine how nurses 
can improve patient care. Studies are underway, for 
example, to find how one can break through hospital 
organizational patterns to reach the patient; to learn 
more about reduction of patient stress; and to deter¬ 
mine how the many nurses who take care of a patient 
during his hospital stay can aid him in feeling that he 
is a real individual and not a case history. Application 
of findings from this type of research is essential if 
patient care is to improve. 

Alumnae of the Yale School of Nursing are located 
in all parts of the United States and on every continent 
except Antarctica. Of the nine professional schools of 
Yale University, the nursing school ranks third, sur¬ 
passed only by medicine and law, in the percentage of 
its graduates who participate in the Yale Alumni Fund 
drives. The nursing school’s alumnae association, of 


which Mary K. Hirata of the class of 1949 is currently 
the president, keeps in touch with most of the school’s 
1,800 living alumnae. This figure includes, of course, 
both those who took their basic preparation for nurs¬ 
ing here and graduate nurses who have completed mas¬ 
ter’s programs in nursing. 

The Yale Corporation's decision in 1956 to drop the 
basic program reflected its view at that time that, for 
various reasons, the university could contribute most 
effectively to nursing by concentrating its efforts on a 
graduate program. The opening of Yale College to 
women this fall suggests that it might be well to re¬ 
evaluate that decision in the light of students’ needs as 
well as nursing's needs. When young men and women 
graduating from Yale College may enter the other pro¬ 
fessional schools of the university to prepare for 
careers in medicine, law, the ministry, and other fields, 
why should the School of Nursing not offer a program 
to prepare them as nurses? 


11 


Trauma Symposium 


O ver 150 persons concerned directly or peripherally 
with emergency treatment of trauma in automobile 
accidents attended an all-day symposium in the Mary 
S. Harkness Auditorium at the School of Medicine on 
March 5. Jointly sponsored by the Section of Ortho¬ 
pedic Surgery and the Department of Pathology, the 
conference included distinguished guest speakers and a 
wide spectrum of conferees. 

Guests were welcomed in an opening speech by 
Senator Jay W. Jackson of the 5th District in Connecti¬ 
cut, who is currently sponsoring a bill in the Legislature 
which would supplant the present coroner system of 
post mortem investigation with a State Medical Ex¬ 
aminer. 


Right: Senator Jay Jackson, left, of Hartford, Connecticut, was introduced 
by Dr. Michael Kashgarian, associate professor of pathology. 

Below: Dr Robert H. Kennedy, director of the field program in trauma of 
the American College of Surgeons, and Dr. Charles Burbank, New Eng¬ 
land regional chairman for the American College of Surgeons’ Committee 
on Trauma, were two of the distinguished guests. Dr. Kristaps Keggi, 
assistant professor of orthopedic surgery, is chairman of the Connecticut 
Committee on Trauma. 


Speakers on the panel included Dr. Alan R. Moritz, 
professor of pathology, and Dr. John H. Davis, professor 
of surgery, from Case-Western Reserve University 
School of Medicine in Cleveland; Col. John P. Stapp, 
chief scientist for the National Highway Safety Bureau 
in Washington, D.C.; and Dr. Paul W. Gikas, associate 
professor of pathology at the University of Michigan 
and deputy medical examiner for the City of Ann 
Arbor. 




12 












Representing the Yale faculty were Dr. Michael 
Kashgarian, associate professor of pathology; Dr. Kri- 
staps J. Keggi, assistant professor of orthopedic sur¬ 
gery and chairman, Connecticut Committee on Trauma 
of the American College of Surgeons; Louis G. Aud- 
ette, television producer for the medical school; Arnold 
Nadler, research associate in the Department of Sur¬ 
gery; and Samuel B. Webb, Jr., instructor in public 
health. The Yale members reported on various aspects 
of the Yale Trauma Study, an analysis of trauma 
patients and their treatment in New Haven, which has 
been in operation for about two years and is funded by 
a grant from the Travelers Research Center, Inc. As an 
adjunct of the study, an index of injury severity has 
been evolved. It consists of a simple scoring system 
which would indicate a patient’s condition and would 
result in better communication and emergency care. 
The system, it was reported, would also be useful in 
statistical and epidemiological work in relation to 
trauma planning and analysis. 


Right: Dr. Paul W. Gikas, right, associate professor of pathology at the 
University of Michigan and a visiting speaker, contemplates a question 
posed by panel moderator John D. Thompson, professor of public health 
at Yale. 


Below: Drs. Alan Moritz, John H. Davis, and Jack Cole enter Mary S. 
Harkness Auditorium. The two guest speakers, on the medical faculty of 
Case-Western Reserve University, held an informal reunion with Dr. Cole, 
formerly of that faculty and now chairman of Yale's Department of 
Surgery. 



Other considerations of the speakers included the 
high incidence of unnecessary automobile accident 
fatalities. They underlined possible steps that could 
be taken on the part of the driver, other occupants of 
the car, and automobile manufacturers to lower the 
death rate on the highway. 

The final presentation included a panel of the par¬ 
ticipating speakers who answered questions from the 
floor. This panel was chaired by John D. Thompson, 
professor of public health. 

In addition to physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and 
public health officers, there was a considerable con¬ 
tingent of non-medical personnel represented in the 
audience, including state and city police, firemen, and 
ambulance attendants. 



13 




Doctor of Diverse Distinctions 

A t the age of six Morton Kligerman knew that he was 
going to be a doctor. His mother thought that the 
family physician in Philadelphia, Dr. Neff, was the 
greatest man in the world. "She had the usual Jewish 
mama’s attitude about doctors,” said Dr. Kligerman, 
“and respected him more than anyone she knew — 
outside of her own family, of course. And she was 
right. Dr. Neff deserved to be respected for the way he 
practiced, for the way he handled my family. I was 
impressed by him as a person though I was a young 
boy then.” 

"I know kids have a thousand notions about what 
they’ll be when they grow up but, from the time I was 
very small, I always felt I'd be a doctor. And as I grew 
older, I was always most interested in the sciences 
and did best in them. Of all the sciences, I preferred 
biology. That is, until I took physics, when I had a 
most unusual physics teacher. He taught high school 
physics during the day and college physics at night.” 

Mr. Young, teacher of physics at Northeast High 
School in Philadelphia, believed in stretching the capac¬ 
ities of his best students — and Klig was one — by 
holding a dialogue with them for the last ten minutes 
of each class hour, exposing the rest of the students 
to the thought processes involved in the solution of 
complex scientific principles, as handled by two or 
three of their peers. 


Faculty Profile: Morton M. Kligerman, M.D. 

Professor of Radiologj, 


m i ^ hi mm m 



Morton Kligerman and 
brother Albert in a studio 
portrait circa 1922. 



"Physics was very exciting to me,” he continued. 
“With relatively little information — principles ex¬ 
pressed as formulae — one could solve many prob¬ 
lems. It was better than using a lot of sitzfleisch and 
learning a lot of detail. In fact, I thought for a time of 
becoming a physicist." 

On graduating from high school, Morton Kligerman 
received a scholarship to Amherst but, because his 
family was poor — his father was a farmer-turned- 
grocer in Philadelphia — he was unable to accept it. 
“In those days scholarships were only for tuition and I 
figured that with all the traveling, it would be too ex¬ 
pensive.” So he lived at home and enrolled at Temple 
University. 

In the summer, after a brief and unsuccessful period 
selling magazine subscriptions, Klig got a job through 
the father of a friend making false teeth. “And they 
were good ones,” he hastens to add. He attended col¬ 
lege for three years, receiving his B.S. degree in medi* 
cal science in 1938, after his first year in medical 
school. He remained at Temple for his medical work 
for the same reason he had gone there initially — 


14 







because he could live at home. Like many students in 
the ’30s, Klig held a job under the National Youth Act 
which paid him about $50 a month. His function was 
to sit at the front desk of Temple University Hospital 
and to run the hospital’s elevator from 7 at night to 7 
in the morning every fifth night. At exam time, he and 
classmate Sam Garfield were hired by other student- 
elevatormen. “We two divided up the jobs when others 
copped out to study. Sam was the brightest boy in the 
class.’’ Dr. Garfield is now chief of staff and attending 
gynecologist at Frankford Hospital in Philadelphia. 

It was while he was still an undergraduate that he 
first met Dr. W. Edward Chamberlain, professor of 
radiology at Temple. The encounter occurred when the 
professor addressed the Hammond Premedical Society, 
a group of honor students of which Klig was a member. 
Chamberlain’s subject concerned the relevancy of phys¬ 
ics to medicine. His thesis was that physics taught one 
to think, to reason, and to solve problems, all processes 
most useful to a medical doctor. The fortuitous mar¬ 
riage of biology and physics — Klig’s strongest subjects 
and the ones which interested him most — tipped the 
scales forever in favor of medicine. 

By coincidence it was also Dr. Chamberlain who 
guided the young doctor to his present professional 
area. As he neared the end of an 18-month rotating 
internship at Temple University Hospital, it became 
incumbent on Klig to choose a specialty, and he had just 
about settled on internal medicine, in the footsteps of 
his former family physician. Dr. Chamberlain propelled 
Klig into another branch of medicine, a decision which 
he has never regretted, by offering him a residency 
with him. “Only it was the oddest presentation. He in¬ 
vited me to his office and told me all the reasons why 
I probably wouldn’t like radiology.” It boiled down to 
less patient contact. Dr. Chamberlain had himself had 
experience on which to base his counseling. For the 
older man had been in practice in Stanford before he 
came east. Chamberlain's medical experience, coupled 
with a strong foundation in electrical engineering, 
made him the likely choice to teach radiology when the 
Stanford medical school purchased its first x-ray ma¬ 
chine. “His negative approach notwithstanding, I have 
never been eased into a decision with more finesse.” 

Klig was a GP at heart and he discovered that 
radiology at Temple offered the same broad spectrum 
of cases, the same high concentration of perplexing 
problems, as internal medicine. “Besides the usual fare 
to which the internist was exposed, I could be involved 
in orthopedics, otolaryngology, and any one of a num¬ 
ber of other areas.” 


At first Klig’s close friends regretted his selection 
of diagnostic radiology, fearing that the choice would 
remove him entirely from patient contact. For some 
people, mention of this branch of medicine conjures 
up an image of a doctor in a laboratory or dark room 
in isolation, making endless pronouncements about the 
endless x-ray films under observation. But in Chamber¬ 
lain’s department the diagnostic radiologist’s role was 
very largely as consultant to the physicians. Further¬ 
more, on two days each week, Klig was a regular mem¬ 
ber of the cardiac clinic and looked after the patients 
in the same manner as the residents in medicine. This 
clinic was scheduled in the evening for the convenience 
of the working patient. 

When Klig left Temple to join the faculty at Colum¬ 
bia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
he found a very distinguished department but the diag¬ 
nostic section was quite different from Temple’s. “I 
felt more like a film reader than a physician. This is 
often the pattern in diagnostic radiology and it taught 
me a lesson I use in my department today. I try very 
hard, with as much influence as I can muster, to steer 
would-be department members and trainees away, no 
matter what their skills, if they are intent on diagnos¬ 
tic radiology as a way of avoiding responsibility for 
the patient. That’s a strikeout with me. There are very 
positive and good reasons for going into diagnostic 
radiology.” 

Meanwhile, at Columbia, the chief of the Radiology 
Department was having difficulty in finding someone 
to assist in the therapy section. One day he turned to 
Klig and said, “Take over the vacant position for six 
months for me.” Klig protested that he would be an 
imposter; it would be especially unfair to the residents. 
“Look,” said the chief, "I know you don’t know any¬ 
thing about therapy but you know more than anyone 
else I can get, and in two years, I’ll wager, you’ll know 
a good deal more.” So, with some misgivings, Klig 
agreed to take over for six months with the promise 
of consultative assistance from some doctors over him 
who were experienced therapists. 

“In three days,” says Yale’s radiology chairman and 
present head of the radiation therapy section, “I knew 
I’d never go back to diagnosis.” After three months, he 
was running a teaching section and had the situation 
well in hand. 

The War Years 

By virtue of his military service, Klig had been ex¬ 
posed to a diverse variety of medical experience in the 


15 


Lieutenant K/igerman 
served on a hospita! ship 
in World War II. Back¬ 
ground is Manila Bay. 

field of radiology. In 1944, at the end of his residency 
at Temple, he joined the Army Medical Corps. His first 
post was at Camp Buttner Station Hospital in Durham, 
North Carolina, where he was assistant chief. All the 
films were piled up on a desk at which he sat, dictat¬ 
ing his findings directly to a secretary. Behind him sat 
his chief who would be leafing through a stack of the 
current medical journals. While Klig interpreted the 
x-rays and indicated what, in his estimation, was the 
nature of each patient's problem, there was a steady 
background refrain of turning pages. Occasionally, a 
voice from behind him would break in on Klig’s com¬ 
mentary: “What do you think of that fourth lumbar 
vertebra?" According to the assistant chief, the chief 
was infallible and the experience unsurpassed. Daily, 
Klig would diagnose over a hundred cases and then the 
chief would bring him up to date on the important 
points of all the papers and journals he had ingested 
during Klig’s examination of the films. This went on 
for nearly a year and seems to have been a highly suc¬ 
cessful arrangement for both parties. 

As time passed, Klig, who had always loved sailing 
and the sea, welcomed assignment to a hospital ship. “I 
was a bachelor and, as long as I had to be in the Army, 
I thought I might as well see the whole thing.” Before 
his tour of duty was over, he had not only sailed but 
also navigated 58,000 miles — three times across the 
Atlantic and twice across the Pacific. His connection 
with radiology at this period was tenuous. He would 
go through the ship’s wards with the field unit on 
board, looking for patients to examine. 

Now Klig the teacher emerged, a role which was to 
recur at various times in his life. This time the subject 
was navigation and his approach was most ingenious. 
He made a sextant out of a wooden cheese box and a 
nurse’s pocket mirror. Equipped with that, Dutton's 
book on navigation, and his HO 211 (a publication of 


the Hydrographic Office which gives bearings for cal¬ 
culating one’s position), he first learned all about navi¬ 
gation for himself and then taught all he had learned! 
to a group of junor third mates who were desirous of; 
taking the examination for promotion. 

When the end of the war came in 1946, Dr. Kliger- 
man was retained in the Army as one of the eleven 
men in the country who had taken the boards in radi-1 
ology. He was first stationed at the New York Port of; 
Embarkation as chief radiologist, and later moved to 
Valley Forge General Hospital. He received his dis- j 
charge in 1947, and returned to Temple as an instructor. ! 
The following year he moved to New York City where, 
during the next decade, he advanced from instructor , 
to associate professor of radiology at Columbia. 

Both of these institutions have taken note of Dr. 
Kligerman’s former affiliation by honoring his achieve- j 
ments. In 1964 Temple University awarded him their | 
Distinguished Alumnus Award. In 1967 he received the 
Commemorative Silver Medallion of Columbia Uni- j 
versify, established on the occasion of the 200th anni- i 
versary of the founding of the College of Physicians ] 
and Surgeons. 

Klig came to Yale at the invitation of the late Presi- ! 
dent A. Whitney Griswold in 1958, the year that a | 
Department of Radiology was first established. “The 
thing that attracted me to Yale more than anything else 
was my understanding that they had a preference for 
people who, besides being good doctors, also did orig¬ 
inal work. And when I came I established the fact that 
I would devote a certain amount of time to original 
research. And I have. Less than I’d like but more than 
I had a chance to anywhere else.” 

Dr. Kligerman feels no dichotomy exists between 
teaching and research. He even triangulates the subject 
by stating that there is no intrinsic battle between 
service to patients, teaching, and research. “They all go 
together. To think otherwise is like saying that a job 
interferes with one’s marriage. A happy marriage and 
a happy job go hand in hand.” 

Of Bread and Ships 

Once divested of his white coat and out of his office, 
Klig displays a completely new set of facets. 

Though he plays no instrument, Klig has long had a 
deep appreciation of music. When he first went to col¬ 
lege he received two seats to attend the Philadelphia 
Symphony for a year and renewed them annually until 
he left for the Army. When he became an intern, he 
brought nothing with him to the hospital but a large 



16 



pile of classical recordings which he played whenever 
the occasion permitted. Four of his fellow house officers, 
who were inclined to scoff at his choice of leisure 
relaxation, were pressured to listen because Klig knew 
that with some exposure to music, they too would find 
this pleasurable and relaxing and because Klig the 
teacher was surfacing again. Every night for three 
quarters of an hour, the teacher played the selections 
and lectured to the four who did, in fact, dwindle to 
two, but two newly-dedicated music lovers. 

He is also a small-boat sailor. Even before his Army 
experience, he had done some sailing. And today, when 
he gets a chance to get away with his family, he fishes 
and sails and swims and has taught his two youngsters 
some proficiency in each. His wife, Barbara, prefers 
to sit in the sun on the beach. “Watching Klig relax,” 
says she, “is the most exhausting thing in the world.” 

Perhaps his most unusual hobby is his prowess at 
cooking and his predilection, in this plastic-wrapped 
age, for making bread. The same dynamism that char¬ 
acterizes Klig’s relaxed moments makes one know 
that he husbands his time in a disciplined fashion: a 
large segment of his day for work; a portion of time 
for sleep: and time for companionship with wife and 
family or friends. With abundant energy, this doctor 
rises in the morning between 5:30 and 6:00, quite 
frequently starting his day by baking several loaves of 
bread, samples of which will appear on his wife’s 
breakfast tray an hour or so later. “This period, early 
in the morning, is my favorite time of day. No one’s 
crabby; no one has resigned; the children are lively 
and fresh.” 

Before most of the world is stirring Klig has served 
a small breakfast to his wife in their bedroom, has had 
a chance to visit with her quietly, and has talked or 
roughhoused with their children who pile into his room 
around 7:15. 

Barbara has a married son, Roger, offspring of a 
previous marriage, who is a student at the Paier School 
of Art in Hamden and lives with his wife in a New 
Haven apartment. Klig too has a child of a previous 
marriage. His older daughter, Hilary, is a senior at 
Purdue and was married last year. Her husband, a class¬ 
mate, has just been accepted for graduate work at MIT 
next year and Klig is obviously proud of and devoted 
to the young couple. 

His face lights up in the same proud fashion when 
he speaks of the two children of his present marriage. 


Dr. Kligerman is a dynamic lecturer who firmly believes in giving equal 
weight to the triad of patient care, research, and teaching. 



17 


There is a boy, Tom, who is 12, and Valii, who was 10 
on December 26th. Klig likes to remember the day she 
was born, for she shares a birthday with him. Ten 
years ago on that date Barbara presented him with a 
handsome old ship’s clock. A little later in the day, 
she went off to the hospital and at 7:00 that evening 
Valli made an appearance. Barbara’s first words to her 
husband at visiting hours were, “If I had known this 
was going to happen today, you never would have 
gotten that clock.” 

In addition to homebaked bread, Klig prides himself 
on his New England clam chowder, a repertoire of 
baked fish dishes, and his home-brewed beer. Besides 
his prowess as chef and gastronome, he has become 
deeply interested in and knowledgeable about modern 


art. Since his marriage to Barbara, whose paintings 
decorate both their home and his office, he has given 
some time to the study of abstract expressionism and 
its exponents. He was on friendly terms with the late 
William Baziotes and is acquainted with Rothko, De- 
Kooning, and Gottlieb. A very large canvas by Gottlieb 
dominates the Kligerman livingroom. His interest has 
also been ignited by modern sculpture and he is at least 
partially responsible for Herbert Ferber’s recent gift of 
one of his bronze pieces to Morse College, the residen¬ 
tial college of which both Klig and Ferber are fellows. 

Whether it is radiology, navigation, cooking, or music 
and art, Morton Kligerman believes in mastering the 
subject totally. Halfway measures are simply not 
sufficient. 

Valli and Tom were suddenly aware of the camera as they concluded 
their card game in the Kligerman living room, to the amusement of their 
parents. Barbara and Klig. 



18 











Internship Appointments 


Class of 1969 


Andrew T. Allan, medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida. 

Brian D. Altman, rotating, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Charles S. Angell, medicine, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland. 

David G. Ansel, surgery, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland. 

David W. Barry, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Robert E. Belliveau, pathology, Yale-Haven Medical Center. 

David A. Berkowitz, rotating, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

Donald H. Buchholz, pathology, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

William E. Bollengier, surgery, North Carolina Memorial Hospital, Chapel 
Hill, North Carolina. 

Bruce W. Burleigh, surgery, University of Oklahoma VA Hospital, Okla¬ 
homa City, Oklahoma. 

William F. Bynum, medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, District 
of Columbia. 

Seth D. Charney, rotating, Mount Zion Hospital, San Francisco, California. 

Joseph P. Cleary, surgery, Georgetown D. C. General Hospital, District 
of Columbia. 

Nelson R. Cooke, rotating, Highland General Hospital, Oakland, Cali¬ 
fornia. 

Leo M. Cooney, Jr., medicine, Boston University 5th & 6th Medical Ser¬ 
vice, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Richard J. Daly, Pediatrics, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, 
Michigan. 

Michael W. Dennis, surgery, George Washington D.C. General Hospital, 
District of Columbia. 

Dharles A. Dinarello, pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Douglass T. Domoto, pathology, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Daniel M. Eichenbaum, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Ralph J. Falkenstein, rotating, Greenwich Hospital, Greenwich, Connecti¬ 
cut. 

Dary S. Farnham, medicine, H. C. Moffitt-University of California Hos¬ 
pitals, San Francisco, California. 

^esley N. Fishelman, rotating, State University Hospital, Upstate Med¬ 
ical Center, Syracuse, New York. 

Itephen P. Fishelman, rotating, State University Hospital, Upstate Med¬ 
ical Center, Syracuse, New York. 

Steven A. Frankel, rotating, Mount Zion Hospital, San Francisco, Cali¬ 
fornia. 

William H. Frazier, surgery, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Royal J. Gay, medicine, Albany Hospital, Albany, New York. 

David A. Geer, surgery, Palo Alto-Stanford Hospital Center, Palo Alto, 
California. 

Sander G. Genser, rotating, University Division of Philadephia General 
Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Robert O. Gordon, surgery, Palo Alto-Stanford Hospital Center, Palo 
Alto, California. 

Steven M. Herzberg, medicine, St. Luke’s Hospital, New York City. 

ohn F. Hiatt, medicine, Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

,arry C. Horowitz, medicine, Stanford University Hospital, Palo Alto, 
California. 

'homas C. Howard, surgery, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

-ee M. Jampol, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Richard G. Jost, medicine, Cleveland Metropolitan Hospital, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Steven M. Kalavsky, pediatrics, Children’s Hospital, Pittsburgh, Penn¬ 
sylvania. 


Joel M. Kaufman, surgery, Colorado Medical Center, Denver, Colorado. 

Paul H. Kelker, pediatrics, Colorado Medical Center, Denver, Colorado. 

John J. Kelly, Jr., medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Rozella S. Knox, medicine, Philadephia General Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Steve Krant, surgery, Presbyterian St. Luke’s, Chicago, Illinois. 

Lynn G. Lagerquist, Jr., medicine, University Hospital, Madison, Wis¬ 
consin. 

Michael Liebowitz, rotating, Harlem Hospital, New York City. 

Elliot M. Livstone, medicine, Presbyterian-University of Pittsburgh Hospi¬ 
tal, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

C. E. Long, III, surgery, Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, Texas. 

Robert L. Marier, medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Paul A. Markey, surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass¬ 
achusetts. 

Arnold F. Mazur, rotating, University of Utah Hospitals, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

John J. Meehan, medicine, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Lloyd F. Mercer, surgery, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida. 

Ellen B. Milstone, pediatrics, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Thomas F. Minehan, surgery, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Bruce K. Nagle, pediatrics, Universtiy of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, 
Michigan. 

Lionel M. Nelson, medicine, San Diego County-University Hospital, San 
Diego, California. 

Nancy Olmsted, pediatrics, Children’s Hospital, San Francisco, Cali¬ 
fornia. 

Eric Otobo, rotating, Los Angeles County General Hospital, USC Medical 
Center, Los Angeles, California. 

Timothy A. Pedley, surgery, Stanford University Hospital, Palo Alto, 
California. 

Richard P. Pollis, surgery, The New York Hospital, New York, New York. 

Deborah A. Putnam, rotating, Queens Hospital, Hawaii. 

Nelson B. Record, Jr., medicine, Cleveland Metropolitan Hospital, Cleve¬ 
land, Ohio. 

Joseph M. Rochford, medicine, VA-Georgetown Hospital, District of 
Columbia. 

Dennis J. Rudzinski, medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida. 

David J. Sahn, pediatrics, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Lutz H. Schlicke, surgery, University of Utah Hospitals, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

Adrian M. Schnall, medicine, Cleveland Metropolitan Hospital, Cleve¬ 
land, Ohio. 

David J. Schulak, rotating, King County Hospital, Settle, Washington. 

Andrew Schwartz, rotating, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Jerrold Jay Silverstein, rotating, Maimonides Hospital, New York City. 

Gerald J. Smallberg, medicine, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann 
Arbor, Michigan. 

Anna S. Solis, pathology fellowship, San Diego County-University Hospi¬ 
tal, San Diego, California. 

Charles W. Swearingen, rotating, Roosevelt Hospital, New York City. 

Michael S. Toren, medicine, San Diego County-University Hospital, San 
Diego, California. 

David L. Upton, medicine, VA-Georgetown Hospital, District of Columbia. 

Robert J. Walat, pathology, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Stephen R. Webb, pediatrics, Yale-New Haven Medical Center. 

Steven C. White, medicine, Program IV-George Washington Hospital, 
District of Columbia. 


19 


Grover F. Powers Day 



It was a full house at Fitkin Amphitheatre when guests, faculty, and 
students convened to honor the late Grover F. Powers. 


ediatrics at Yale will long be considered his creation 
-L and the measure of his life’s work.” So spoke the late 
Dr. Daniel Darrow some years ago about his colleague 
and friend, Grover F. Powers. On March 26, nearly 300 
former students, house staff and their wives, came to the 
medical school from all parts of the country, in confirm¬ 
ing testimony to the success of “his life’s work,” and to 
participate in a day of activities honoring the late Dr. 
Powers. 

Grover F. Powers Day began with coffee and remi¬ 
niscences in the Beaumont Room. Pediatric grand rounds 
were followed by speakers who represented areas clos¬ 
est to Dr. Powers’ own sphere of interest and accomplish¬ 
ment. Dr. Harry H. Gordon, dean of the Albert Einstein 
College of Medicine, began the proceedings with a poi¬ 
gnant tribute to the late pediatrician. An illustrated pres¬ 
entation on intrauterine growth retardation was given by 
Dr. Frederick C. Battaglia of the University of Colorado 
Medical Center. The newly appointed professor of epi¬ 


demiology and public health at Yale, Dr. George Rosen! 
discussed youth in revolt, past and present. Dr. Leon E. 
Rosenberg, associate professor of medicine and pediat- 1 
rics, presented evidence of inherited disorders demon-i 
strating vitamin deficiency, and Dr. Charles U. Lowe,; 
scientific director of the National Institute of Child! 
Health and Human Development, delivered the Eleventh 
Annual Grover F. Powers Lecture in a talk entitled, “Child 
Health and Public Policy, U.S.A." 

At that time, formal announcement was made of the 
initiation of a search for funds to endow a Grover F. 
Powers Professorship, which will provide an opportun¬ 
ity for grateful colleagues, patients, and friends to com¬ 
memorate his work and maintain his tradition in the 
Department of Pediatrics at Yale. 

Additional demonstrations of Dr. Powers' influence 
and diagnostic abilities came to light during the cocktail 
and dinner hour with Dr. Myron E. Wegman (’32), Dean 
of the School of Public Health at the University of Mich- 


20 







Above: Dr. Harry Gordon (hs ’32) chats with Dean Rediich and Dr. 
Russell B. Scobie f 29) during the cocktail hour. 


Right: Four disciples of Grover Powers convene in the faculty lounge: 
Drs. Robert A. Kramer (’55) of West Hartford, Connecticut; Paul Gold- 
i stein ('49) of New Haven; Richard Olmsted (hs '49) of Portland, Oregon; 
- and Richard H. Granger of New Haven. 


Left: Dr. Ira V. Hiscock, 
Anna M. R. Lauder Profes¬ 
sor Emeritus of Public 
Health, exchanges a few 
words with Dr. Charles D. 
Cook, chairman of the De¬ 
partment of Pediatrics, at 
Pitkin Amphitheatre. 


Right: Dr. Charles U. Lowe 
(’45) delivered the 11th an¬ 
nual Grover F. Powers Lec¬ 
ture in the Mary S. Hark ness 
Memorial Auditorium. 




| 


f 


igan, presiding. In addition to his own anecdotal de¬ 
livery, Dr. Wegman recognized members from among 
the dining guests who spoke informally, giving life and 
flavor to the memory of their dedicated teacher and 
friend. Those who chose to share a nostalgic moment 
or bear testimony t-o diagnostic prowess or devoted 
attention spanned the generations of Powers’ colleagues 
and students and included Dr. Edward T. Wakeman 
(’22); Dr. Richard Olmsted (hs ’49); Dr. Ralph A. Ross 
(hs ’35); Dr. Milton Senn, Sterling Professor of Pedi¬ 
atrics; Dr. Ruth Whittemore, clinical professor of pedi¬ 
atrics; and Dr. Leona Baumgartner (’34), bearing mes¬ 
sages of regret and good wishes from Drs. Martha Eliot 
(hs ’23) and Ethel Dunham (hs ’20). 

Another member of Powers’ house staff who was un¬ 
able to be present, Dr. John A. V. Davies, (hs ’26) of Bos¬ 
ton, distilled the prevailing atmosphere of the evening, 
when he wrote in his letter of regret: “. . . he touched all 
he met with his spirit.” 


Below left: Dr. Doris L. Wethers (’52) of New York City and Dr. Raymond 
S. Duff (’52), associate professor of pediatrics, during the social hour. 
Below right: Dr. Ruth Whittemore, clinical professor of pediatrics, shares 
reminiscences with friends of the late Grover F. Powers at the dinner in 
the Edward S. Harkness Memorial Hall. Toastmaster Myron E. Wegman 
(’32) is at right. 



21 















In and About Sterling Hall 


Dr. Horstmarin 

Dr. Horstmann Appointed 
John Rodman Paul Professor 

Dr. Dorothy M. Horstmann became 
the first woman ever to hold an en¬ 
dowed chair at Yale University this 
spring when she was named John 
Rodman Paul Professor of Epidemi¬ 
ology. The new professorship, es¬ 
tablished under the bequest of the 
late Susan Dwight Bliss, honors Dr. 
Paul, professor emeritus, who re¬ 
tired in 1961 after 33 years on the 
Yale medical faculty. A leading 
authority in the field of epidem¬ 
iology and preventive medicine, he 
is currently writing a book on the 
history of poliomyelitis. 

Dr. Horstmann, a member of the 
Yale medical faculty since 1942, is 
noted for her research on the pre¬ 
vention of poliomyelitis. She worked 
closely with Dr. Paul for many years 
in the Yale Poliomyelitis Unit. Her 
research contributions include an 
important breakthrough in the battle 
against polio when, in 1952, she dis¬ 
covered the presence of polio virus 
in the bloodstream in early stages 
of the disease. This finding, also 
made independently by Dr. David 
Bodian at Johns Hopkins, confirmed 
the fact that the virus could be 
intercepted by vaccine-stimulated 
antibodies in the bloodstream. 

Since 1962, Dr. Horstmann has 
been investigating rubella and the 
rubella syndrome in infants. Last 
year she and Dr. Robert W. McCol¬ 
lum, professor of epidemiology, 
conducted extensive field trials of 


the rubella vaccine HPV-77 in Dan¬ 
bury, Connecticut, which showed 
the vaccine to be more than 90 per 
cent effective. 

Markle Scholar Named 
Associate Dean 

Dr. James P. Comer, assistant pro¬ 
fessor of psychiatry, has been 
appointed a Markle Scholar in Aca¬ 
demic Medicine for 1969-74. In ad¬ 
dition, Dr. Comer has been named 
an associate dean in the School of 
Medicine. 

The Markle scholarship, given by 
the John and Mary R. Markle Foun¬ 
dation of New York, is one of the 



country's most distinguished awards 
made to promising young scientists 
in medicine. It provides for a $30,000 
grant to be applied to the scholar’s 
career development over a five-year 
period. Dr. Comer will continue to 
conduct research in his field of inter¬ 
est, social psychiatry with particular 
attention to race relations and educa¬ 
tion, after assuming his new post as 
associate dean. In the latter capaci¬ 
ty he will work closely with Dr. 
Howard Levitin, associate dean, on 
matters concerning student affairs 
and curriculum. 

A native of East Chicago, Indiana, 
Dr. Comer was graduated from 
Indiana University in 1956 and re¬ 
ceived his M.D. degree from How¬ 
ard University College of Medicine 
in 1960. He also holds an M.P.H. 
degree awarded him in 1964 by the 
University of Michigan. 



He served his residency in psychi 
atry at Yale from 1964 to 1967 
Following a one-year assignmen 
with the Center for the Study o 
Child and Family Mental Healtf 
of the National Institute of Menta 
Health, he returned to New Haver 
in 1968 to join the Yale faculty ir 
the Child Study Center. 

Dr. Comer is currently co-direc¬ 
tor of a program designed to brinj 
the knowledge of individual and 
group dynamics to bear on the prob¬ 
lems of inner city education. Known 
as the Baldwin-King Schools Proj¬ 
ect, it is part of a six-year program 
being conducted jointly by the Yale 
Child Study Center and the New 
Haven Board of Education with sup¬ 
port from the Ford Foundation. 

Dr. Comer is the author of several 
major articles on the psychiatric 
aspects of race relations, including 
"The Social Power of the Negro’’,! 
Scientific American, April, 1967 and 
“Individual Development and Black 
Rebellion: Some Parallels”, Midway, 
University of Chicago, Summer,! 
1968. 

Dr. Yesner Named Associate Dean 
For VA Hospital Affairs 

Dr. Raymond Yesner, associate pro- i 
fessor of pathology, has been ap- j 
pointed associate dean for Veteran 
Administration Hospital affairs at 
the medical school. At the same 
time, Dr. Yesner was named chief 
of staff at the West Haven Veterans 
Administration Hospital. 

In the newly created associate I 
deanship, Dr. Yesner will be respon¬ 
sible for the VA hospital’s program ' 
of medical education and research, 
and will be the liaison between that 
hospital and the medical school. 

Dr. Yesner has had a distinguish¬ 
ed career in the field of pathology 
with particular reference to cancer 
research. He has done extensive 
laboratory research on patterns and 
characteristics of tissue structure ; 
and their changes in response to 
chemotherapy. 

A native of Columbia, Georgia, ! 


22 










Dr. Yesner received his B.A. degree 
from Harvard College in 1935 where 
he majored in chemistry. In 1941 he 
received the M.D. degree from Tufts 
University School of Medicine. He 
served both his internship and his 
residency at Beth Israel Hospital in 
Boston from 1941 to 1944. 

During World War II Dr. Yesner 
was a captain in the Marine Corps 
and chief of laboratory service at 
several medical installations. In 
1947, he joined the VA hospital 
in Newington, Connecticut, as chief 
of laboratory service where he re¬ 
mained until 1953. With the estab¬ 
lishment of the West Haven VA 
hospital in 1953, he was appointed 
chief of laboratory service at that 
institution. 

In 1949 he was appointed assist¬ 
ant clinical professor of pathology at 
the Yale Medical School. In 1952 he 
was promoted to associate clinical 
professor and in 1964 he became as¬ 
sociate professor of pathology. 

National Book Award Won 
by Dr. Lifton 

Dr. Robert J. Lifton, professor of 
psychiatry, was awarded the 1968 
National Book Award in science for 
his volume Death in Life, a psycho¬ 
logical study of the survivors of 
Hiroshima. The book was cited by 
the judges as having made “vivid 
to us in literary form the social and 
ethical consequences of a single act 
of war.” The judges were Dr. Jacob 
Bronowski of the Salk Institute for 


Biological Studies; Dr. Theodosius 
Dobzhansky, professor of genetics 
at the Rockefeller University; and 
Walter Sullivan, science editor of 
the New York Times. 

In his acceptance speech at the 
awards ceremony in New York in 
March, Dr. Lifton said that he would 
contribute half of the $1000 prize 
to a special fund for the survivors 
of Hiroshima. The other half would 
be equally divided between two 
American groups — the Council for 
a Livable World, and Physicians 
for Social Responsibility — groups 
which, he said, “refuse to allow us 
to deceive ourselves about nuclear 
and biological weapons, and insist 
that we pursue science to promote 
life, and medicine to promote heal¬ 
ing.” 

Dr. Lifton holds the Foundations 
Fund for Research in Psychiatry 
Professorship. 



A seldom reproduced photograph of Dr. Cush¬ 
ing, taken in his library at 305 Walnut Street, 
Brookline, Massachusetts, in 1931. 


The Centennial of 
Harvey Cushing’s Birth 

It is entirely fitting that a collec¬ 
tion of letters, books, and photo¬ 
graphs marking the highlights in the 
life of Harvey Cushing should be 
exhibited in the Cushing Rotunda 
in observance of the centennial of 
his birth. 


Cushing, who was born on April 
8, 1869, traced his medical heritage 
back four generations to include a 
great grandfather, David Cushing, 
who was a physician in Massa¬ 
chusetts and a grandfather Erastus 
and father, Henry, who were doc¬ 
tors in Cleveland. He received the 
B.A. degree from Yale in 1891 and 
the M.D. degree from Harvard in 
1895. After an internship at Massa¬ 
chusetts General Hospital, he went 
to Johns Hopkins as a resident at 
the invitation of Dr. William Hal- 
sted. In 1912 he joined the medical 
faculty at Harvard as professor of 
surgery and surgeon-in-chief at 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. At his 
retirement, President Angell pre¬ 
vailed on him to return to New 
Haven and he remained here until 
his death in 1939. 

He is perhaps less well known for 
his preoccupation with baseball and 
his skill at drawing. And he is cer¬ 
tainly less well remembered than 
he should be for the fact that, 
through the terms of the bequest of 
his books and papers — together 
with those of the late Arnold Klebs 
and John Fulton — the Yale Medical 
Library exists within the confines 
of the medical school building and 
contains, among its holdings, a 
unique collection of historico-medi- 
cal material. 

An ardent bibliophile, he was also 
a prolific author, dating back to 
1912, when he published his first 
full-length book, and the first any¬ 
where on the subject of modern 
endocrinology, The Pituitary Body 
and its Disorders. 

As their contribution to the cen¬ 
tennial celebration, a committee 
from the American Association of 
Neurological Surgeons (formerly 
The Harvey Cushing Society) has 
issued a collection of his most sig¬ 
nificant papers in one volume, 
Harvey Cushing; Selected Papers 
on Neurosurgery. Copiously illus¬ 
trated with photographs and draw¬ 
ings, including some of Cushing’s 
own anatomical sketches, the book 


23 











has been edited by Donald D. Mat- 
son and William J. German, pro¬ 
fessor emeritus of neurosurgery, and 
members of a committee from the 
society. 

Students Sought from 
Minority Groups 

A special committee established by 
Dean Redlich to recruit minority 
group members for the health pro¬ 
fessions has been at work for nearly 
a year. The Committee for the Re¬ 
cruitment of American Black and 
Spanish-speaking Students is com¬ 
posed of members of New Haven’s 
black and Spanish-speaking com¬ 
munities and members of the Yale 
medical faculty, administrative staff, 
and student body. The committee’s 
work is supported by a grant from 
the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation. 

The aims of the committee are to 
increase applications for minority 
group members both to the School 
of Medicine and the School of Pub¬ 
lic Health. Committee members 
have been visiting colleges and uni¬ 
versities to talk with students and 
counselors about Yale’s programs 
and to encourage applications. Par¬ 
ticular attention is being given to 
colleges in Connecticut and in the 
greater Boston and New York areas, 
but teams from the committee have 
also traveled to the South to visit 
colleges that are primarily black. 

Alumni who are interested in 
helping the committee’s effort may 
obtain copies of recruitment folders 
by writing to Mr. Courtland S. Wil¬ 
son, Committee for Recruitment, 
Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar 
Street, New Haven, Conn. 06510. 

Honors and Awards to Faculty 
Members 

Dr. Gerald L. Klerman, associate pro¬ 
fessor of psychiatry and director of 
the Connecticut Mental Health Cen¬ 
ter, has received the Lester N. Hof- 
heimer Prize for Research at the an¬ 
nual meeting of the American Psy¬ 
chiatric Association in Miami, Flor¬ 
ida, on May 2. Dr. Klerman shared 


the award with Dr. Jonathan O. Cole 
of Boston, and Dr. Solomon C. Cold- 
berg of Chevy Chase, Maryland. 

The prize is given annually for 
the outstandingresearchaccomplish¬ 
ment in psychiatry and mental health 
and was presented to the three col¬ 
laborating investigators this year for 
their research demonstrating the ef¬ 
fectiveness of the use of phenothia- 
zine in relieving symptoms of schizo¬ 
phrenic patients and in encouraging 
long-range control of the psychoses. 
The award was established in mem¬ 
ory of Lt. Lester N. Hofheimer, who 
was killed in World War II. 

Dr. Thomas R. Forbes, associate 
dean and professor of anatomy, has 
been elected a Fellow of the Royal 
Society of Medicine in London. 

Dr. Howard M. Spiro, professor of 
medicine, has been elected to honor¬ 
ary membership in the Connecticut 
Society of American Board Intern¬ 
ists. In extending this honor, the So¬ 
ciety noted that in future years such 
honorary membership may be of¬ 
fered to other distinguished men in 
the State. Dr. Spiro is the first to be 
so named. 



Dr. Diana Slaughter, assistant pro¬ 
fessor of psychology and a member 
of the staff of the Yale Child Study 
Center, has received the Distin¬ 
guished Research Award of Pi Lamb¬ 
da Theta, a national educational hon¬ 
or society. The award, which was 
established this year to recognize 
outstanding research by women, was 
given in recognition of Dr. Slaugh¬ 


ter’s doctoral dissertation, “Mater¬ 
nal Antecedents of the Academic 
Achievement Behaviors of Negro 
Head Start Children.” 

Dr. Sofia Simmonds, associate pro¬ 
fessor of biochemistry, was award¬ 
ed the American Chemical Society's 
Garvan Medal in April at the na¬ 
tional meeting of the society in 
Minneapolis. Dr. Simmonds’ re¬ 
search has been concerned with the 
metabolism of microorganisms, pro¬ 
tein synthesis, and the clarification 


of gene functions in mutant strains. 
The Garvan Medal was established | 



Dr. John A. Kirchner, professor ; 
of otolaryngology and chief of the 
section of otolaryngology, was ; 
named the 1969 recipient of the 
Newcomb award of the American 
Laryngological Association. The 
award is given annually to the 1 
member who* has made the most 
outstanding contribution in the pre¬ 
vious year to the literature on the 
larynx. In 1966, Dr. Kirchner was 
the recipient of the organization’s 
Casselberry Prize, the nation's high¬ 
est award for research on disor¬ 
ders of the larynx. 

Dr. David A. Hilding, associate 
professor of otolaryngology, re¬ 
ceived the Harris P. Mosher Award 
of the Triological Society at the 
organization’s annual meeting in 
March. The award recognizes Dr. 
Hilding’s research on the develop¬ 
ment of the cochlea, or inner ear. 


24 






At the same time, Dr. Hilding was 
elected to membership in this na¬ 
tional organization of otologists, 
rhinologists, and laryngologists. 

Dr. M. David Egger, assistant 
professor of anatomy, has received 
a research scientist development 
award from the National Institute 
of Mental Health. The award, a 
five-year renewable grant, was 
made to Dr. Egger for his neuro¬ 
physiological studies, with partic¬ 
ular reference to spinal reflexes. He 
has also developed a light micro¬ 
scope for studying living cells near 
the surface of tissue which will 
have important implications in 
brain research. 

Dr. Thomas L. Lentz, assistant 
professor of anatomy, is the recip¬ 
ient of a five-year career develop¬ 
ment award from the National 
Institute of Neurological Diseases 
and Blindness. The award to Dr. 
Lentz is to further his studies as a 
research scientist and to allow him 
the opportunity for in-depth inves¬ 
tigation into the mechanisms by 
which nerves maintain the struc¬ 
tural integrity of tissues, such as 
muscle, and control regeneration in 
some animals. 

Dr. Paul Honored 

Following is the text of a joint reso¬ 
lution adopted by the Connecticut 
General Assembly on April 2, 1969: 
Resolved by this Assembly: 
WHEREAS, Dr. John R. Paul, Pro¬ 
fess or Emeritus of Epidemiology 
and Preventive Medicine and Lec¬ 
turer in the History of Science in 
Medicine at Yale University will 
he celebrating his seventy-sixth 
birthday on April 18, 1969; and 
WHEREAS, he has served as Di¬ 
rector of the Regional Serum Bank, 
World Health Organization, con¬ 
sultant to the Secretary of War 
from 1941 through 1946, consultant 
to the United States Public Health 
Service and has served the United 
States government in the Middle 
East, Japan, Korea and the Soviet 
Union; and 


WHEREAS, he has served on the 
Research Committees of the Na¬ 
tional Foundation for Infantile Pa¬ 
ralysis and his pioneering work in 
the field of polio research is in part 
responsible for the eradication of 
this dread disease; and 
WHEREAS, he has been the recip¬ 
ient of numerous awards and hon¬ 
ors including the Medal of Free¬ 
dom, USA and was named to the 
Georgia Hall of Fame of Infantile 
Paralysis. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RE¬ 
SOLVED, that the members of this 
assembly unite in congratulating 
Dr. John R. Paul upon his seventy- 
sixth birthday and in commending 
him for his dedication and his many 
accomplishments during his long 
and illustrious medical career; and 
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that 
the clerks of the house and senate 
cause a copy of this resolution to 
be sent to Dr. John R. Paul as a 
sincere expression of the high es¬ 
teem in which he is held. 

In transmitting a copy of the reso¬ 
lution to Dean Redlich, Dr. Franklin 
M. Foote, Commissioner of Health, 
noted that the action by the legisla¬ 
ture was very unusual. “During the 
past forty years,” he wrote, "so far 
as we can remember, only one other 
physician has been commended in 
this way . . 

Students Exchange Ideas 
With Leaders 

Yale medical students have been 
having informal evening discussions 
this spring with prominent people 
in education, politics, and other 
fields. President Kingman Brewster, 
Jr., Rev. Malcolm Boyd, Eugene and 
Edna Rostow, and philosopher Paul 
Weiss have been among the nota¬ 
bles who have come to dinner at 
Edward S. Harkness Memorial Hall 
and then joined students in the 
lounge for an exchange of ideas and 
attitudes on contemporary issues. 
The meetings were arranged by the 
school’s Student Council and Stu¬ 
dent Health Project. 


Two Students Win 
International Fellowships 

Robert Stuart Stern and Daniel 
Wuensch, both of the class of 1970, 
have been awarded international 
fellowships for study abroad this 
summer. The fellowships have been 
made possible through grants from 
the Association of American Medi¬ 
cal Colleges in conjunction with the 
U.S. Public Health Service. Both 
students will travel to Tel Aviv, 
Israel, to participate in research 
training projects at the Tel Aviv 
University-Tel Hashomeer Govern¬ 
ment Hospital. 

Roberts Memorial Lecture 

Dr. Gerald Caplan, clinical professor 
of psychiatry at the Harvard Medi¬ 
cal School, delivered the 13th Ber¬ 
tram H. Roberts Memorial Lecture 
at Yale on March 4. His subject was 
“Prospects for Community Psychi¬ 
atry: Lessons from History.” The 
lectures honor Dr. Roberts, a mem¬ 
ber of the Department of Psychiatry 
faculty who died in 1965. 

School Joins in Seminar 
On Medical Ethics 

Physicians, lawyers, and theolo¬ 
gians exchanged views on medical 
experimentation, organ transplants, 
euthanasia, and other matters in¬ 
volving medical ethics in a four-day 
symposium at Yale in March. The 
occasion was the Divinity School’s 
annual convocation of which, this 
year, both the School of Medicine 
and the Law School were also spon¬ 
sors. 

R. Paul Ramsey, professor of re¬ 
ligion at Princeton University, deliv¬ 
ered the Lyman Beecher Lectures 
during the convocation. Yale medi¬ 
cal faculty who participated as 
speakers or panelists included Dean 
Redlich; Dr. Howard Levitin, asso¬ 
ciate dean and associate professor 
of medicine: Dr. Richard A. Selzer, 
clinical associate in surgery; and 
Dr. Jay Katz, professor of law and 
psychiatry. 


25 








A colorful parade through the Hill 
neighborhood of New Have n on April 12 
highlighted the formal opening of the 
Hill Health Center on Columbus Avenue. 
The center is a community-based facil¬ 
ity designed to provide comprehensive 
health care services to all residents un¬ 
der the age of 21 Dr Alvin H. Novack, 
associate professor of clinical pedi¬ 
atrics, is project director. Speakers and 
guests on the platform for the dedica¬ 
tion ceremony represented a broad spec¬ 
trum of health interests in the com¬ 
munity. The audience of some 300 in¬ 
cluded Mrs. James Rowland Angel 1; 
Rachel Robinson, director of nursing at 
the Connecticut Mental Health Center; 
President Kingman Brewster, Jr., of 
Yale; and Dean Margaret Arnstein of 
the Yale School of Nursing. 


New Book 

Rehabilitation and Medicine (Vol¬ 
ume 10 of Physical Medicine Li¬ 
brary) edited by Dr, Sidney Licht, 
curator of the Physical Medicine 
Collection, Yale Medical Library 
(Elizabeth Licht, publisher). This is 
a comprehensive compendium on 
the subject of rehabilitation, the 
physical care and related therapies 
involved in the treatment of the 
physically disabled. In 24 chapters 


by as many contributing authors, 
disabilities — their definition, de¬ 
scription, treatment and possible 
responses to treatment — are dealt 
with. This is a book for physicians 
who are responsible for assisting 
patients to cope and live with their 
physical problems in as normal a 
fashion as possible. Among the Yale 
contributors are Dr. Louis B. Fier- 
man. associate clinical professor of 
psychiatry, Dr. Herman L. Kamen- 
etz, clinical associate in physical 


medicine, Dr. F. Patrick McKegney.j 
Jr., associate professor of psychiatry 
and medicine, and Dr. Licht. Dr. 
Harold M. Sterling, class of 1951, on 1 
the staff of The Rehabilitation Insti- 
ute in Boston, Mass., also contrib-i 
uted a chapter. 

Faculty Notes 

Dr. Theodore Lidz, chairman of the 
Department of Psychiatry, presented 
the first Samuel Novey Lecture in 
Psychological Medicine at the Johns 


26 














Hopkins School of Medicine on 
March 18. The subject of his ad- 
j dress was “Disruptions of Life Pat- 
! terns and Psychosomatic Disorders.’’ 
In the following month, from April 
7 through 11, Dr. Lidz was the 
Clarence P. Oberndorf Visiting Pro¬ 
fessor of Psychiatry at the Mount 
Sinai Medical School in New York. 

The Department of Psychiatry 
was host to the meeting of the 
Northeastern Professors of Psychi¬ 
atry, March 13-15. Dr. Lidz opened 
the meeting by presenting an ad¬ 
dress on “A New Proposal for the 
Education of Psychiatrists.’’ Dr. 
Marshall Edelson, associate pro¬ 
fessor of psychiatry, also presented 
a paper entitled, “The Integration 
of the Behavioral Sciences and 
Clinical Experience in Teaching 
Medical Students.” 

Dr. Kenneth Keniston, associate 
professor of psychology, was a 
visiting lecturer at Southern Meth¬ 
odist University, Dallas, Texas, 
March 19-21, at which time he ad¬ 
dressed both the Superior Studies 
Program and the student associa¬ 
tion. Both of his lectures dealt 
with the alienation of American 
youth. He also delivered the Walter 
VanDyke Bingham Memorial Lec¬ 
ture at the Carnegie-Mellon Uni¬ 
versity in Pittsburgh on March 26; 
the topic was “Youth as a Stage of 
Life.” 

Dr. Samuel Ritvo, clinical profes¬ 
sor of psychiatry and president of 
the American Psychoanalytic Asso¬ 
ciation, chaired the afternoon meet¬ 
ing of the Third Pan-American 
Congress for Psychoanalysis, held at 
the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. The sub¬ 
ject of the meeting was “The First 
Psychoanalytic Hour.” 

Dr. Albert }. Solnit, professor of 
pediatrics and psychiatry and direc¬ 
tor of the Yale Child Study Center, 
took office as president-elect of the 
American Psychoanalytic Associa¬ 
tion in May. Dr. Solnit is presently 
serving his second year of office as 
president of the American Associa¬ 
tion for Child Psychoanalysis and of 


the Western New England Psycho¬ 
analytic Society. 

The American Association for 
Child Psychonalysis held its fourth 
annual scientific meeting in New 
Haven, March 28-30. Dr. Solnit pre¬ 
sided over the opening session and 
was a contributor at other sessions. 
The meeting, consisting of lectures 
and-workshops, was in session for 
three days and had, as its overall 
topic, “Problems of Technique in 
Child Analysis in Relation to De¬ 
velopmental Stages.” Dr. Ritvo also 
presided over an afternoon work¬ 
shop session, one of three study 
groups formed to augment and ex¬ 
change material based on the three 
morning addresses. His area of dis¬ 
cussion concerned pre-latency. A 
highlight of the meeting was the 
presentation of “John, 17 Months,” 
a film made in England by James 
and Joyce Robertson of the Tavi¬ 
stock Institute. The motion picture, 
which is not yet in public circula¬ 
tion, deals with the despair and 
personality changes in a youngster 
whose mother places him in a nur¬ 
sery for ten days while she goes to 
the hospital to have a second child. 

Dr. Seymour Lustman, professor 
of psychiatry at the Child Study 
Center, was visiting professor of 
psychiatry at the University of 
Colorado in Denver in March, at 
which time he delivered the Aaron 
Brown Memorial Lecture at the 
College of Medicine. His topic was 
“A Prospective on the Study of 
Man.” The following day he ad¬ 
dressed the Denver Psychoanalytic 
Society, presenting a paper entitled 
“The Concept of Critical Period.” 

Dr. Martha Leonard, assistant 
professor of pediatrics at the Child 
Study Center, attended the annual 
meeting of the American Ortho¬ 
psychiatric Association in New 
York. Dr. Leonard was chairman of 
a panel which dealt with “Fathers 
Outside the Home.” 

Dr. Melvin Lewis, associate pro¬ 
fessor of pediatrics and psychiatry 
at the Child Study Center, attend¬ 


ing the same meeting, chaired a 
workshop discussing “The Ado¬ 
lescent on a Pediatric Ward.” 

Dr. Sally Provence, professor of 
pediatrics at the Child Study Cen¬ 
ter, attended a meeting of the 
regional supervisors of the OEO 
Parent and Child Centers in Wash¬ 
ington, D.C. at the end of April. 
Dr. Provence addressed the group 
on the subject of “Developmental 
Needs of the Infant.” 

Dr. Adrian M. Ostfeld, Anna M. 
Lauder Professor of Epidemiology 
and Public Health and chairman of 
the Department of Epidemiology and 
Public Health, was recently named 
to the Training Grant Committee on 
Aging of the National Institute of 
Child Health and Human Develop¬ 
ment. 

He has also been appointed to 
serve as a member of the Veterans 
Administration Cooperative Studies 
Evaluation Committee. This group, 
which is under the auspices of the 
Department of Medicine and Sur¬ 
gery of the VA, considers and eval¬ 
uates effective treatment of stroke, 
and makes recommendations on the 
basis of its findings. 

Dr. Arend Bouhuys, professor 
of medicine and epidemiology, 
attended the International Confer¬ 
ence on Pneumoconiosis in Johan¬ 
nesburg, South Africa, and pre¬ 
sented a paper to the conference 
entitled “Byssinosis and Textile 
Workers.” 

Dr. Jordi Casals, professor of epi¬ 
demiology, was invited by the New 
York Society of Tropical Medicine 
to deliver the society's annual 
Theobald Smith Memorial Lecture. 
At the annual meeting, held in New 
York on May 14, Dr. Casals spoke 
on the subject, “Certain Aspects of 
the Immune Response of Verte¬ 
brates to Arbovirus Infections.” 

Dr. Jonathan H. Pincus, associate 
professor of medicine (neurology), 
attended a meeting in April of the 
American Academy of Neurology in 
Washington, D.C., where he pre¬ 
sented a paper on the thiamine- 


27 


course in “Preventive Aspects of 
Chronic Diseases.” He also attended 
the First International Congress on 
Death and Resuscitation and led a 
panel discussion at the University 
of Ferrara on “The Distribution of 
Medical Services.” 


Recent Appointments to the 
Faculty 


s 


Yale University Health Service 

Plans have been announced for reor¬ 
ganization of the University Health 
Service as a prepaid, comprehensive 
plan available to all students and, on 
a voluntary basis, to all faculty, staff, 
and dependents. The program will be 
the first of its kind to function direct¬ 
ly within a university and offers 
an exceptional opportunity for con¬ 
structive cooperation between the 
new service and the Yale-New Haven 
Medical Center. Patients will be hos¬ 
pitalized at the medical center and 
members of the staff will also be 
members of the medical faculty. 


Dr. George Rosen, professor of 
health education at the School of 
Public Health and Administrative 
Medicine of Columbia University 
and a leading medical historian, will 
join the faculties of the Yale School 
of Medicine and the Yale Graduate 
School in a joint appointment effec 
tive July 1. Dr. Rosen will be profeS' 
sor of the history of medicine in the 
Department of the History of Science 
and Medicine and also professor of 
epidemiology and public health. 

A native of New York, Dr. Rosen 
was graduated from City College in 
1910. He received his M.D. degree 
from the University of Berlin, Ger¬ 
many, in 1935, and the Ph.D. and 
M.P.H. degrees from Columbia Uni¬ 
versity in 1944 and 1947, respective¬ 
ly. In 1951 Dr. Rosen was named 


Model of the proposed University Health Service building 



1 jJL 



i!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 
iriiii i jii ■ riri 

* »■■■■■ ™ ■ m wm m 

II II Bill II ■! 

■ ■ ■ ■■ mi wm m u wm ■ B 

" ' 'liJIMUS* 





linked lesion in subacute necrotizing 
encephalomyelopathy. The research 
was conducted by Dr. Pincus and 
his co-workers, Dr. Jack R. Cooper, 
associate professor of pharmacol¬ 
ogy, and Dr. Yoshinori Itokawa, re¬ 
search associate in pharmacology. 

The three doctors have demon¬ 
strated a lack of thiamine triphos¬ 
phate in the brain in this important 
but rare disease, and the existence 
of a factor in blood, urine, and cere¬ 
brospinal fluid which inhibits the 
synthesis of thiamine triphosphate. 
They are attempting to isolate and 
characterize this factor toward de¬ 
vising treatment to counteract the 
inhibitor. Their findings represent 
a significant breakthrough in that 
they establish the biochemical basis 
of the illness. 

Dr. Jack W. Cole, Ensign Profes¬ 
sor of Surgery and chairman of the 
Department of Surgery, was one of 
the speakers at a conference held 
in Bethesda, Maryland, to investi¬ 
gate the possibilities of a national 
biomedical education communica¬ 
tion network. Dr. Cole spoke on 
sharing resources. The two-day con¬ 
ference was sponsored by the Coun¬ 
cil of Academic Societies of the 
Association of American Medical 
Colleges and the National Library 
of Medicine. 

Dr. Frederick H. Hehre, associate 
professor of anesthesiology, joined 
faculty members of the University of 
Cincinnati School of Medicine and 
other distinguished guest lecturers 
in a postgraduate course on problems 
of the fetus and newborn infant. 
These sessions for physicians, held 
in January, were offered through the 
school's continuation medical edu¬ 
cation department and were jointly 
sponsored by the Department of Ob¬ 
stetrics and Gynecology and the 
Division of Neonatology of the De¬ 
partment of Pediatrics. 

Dr. Massimo Calabresi, associate 
clinical professor of medicine, spent 
the month of January at the Grad¬ 
uate School of Public Health of the 
University of Perugia in Italy. He 
was a visiting professor and gave a 


Construction of a new building to 
house the clinic and infirmary will 
be under way soon and is expected 
to be completed by September, 1970. 
In the meantime, a staff will be as¬ 
sembled. Inquiries regarding appoint¬ 
ment to the staff are invited and, un¬ 
til a Director of Professional Services 
is selected, should be directed to Dr. 
Vernon W. Lippard at the School of 
Medicine. 


professor of public health education 1 
at Columbia, a position he has held 
until the present time. He has, in ad¬ 
dition, been a visiting lecturer on 
medical care at Harvard and a visit¬ 
ing professor of the history of medi¬ 
cine at Yale. 

A prolific writer, he is the author 
of eight books and more than 160 
articles on subjects of medical his¬ 
torical interest. From 1946 to 1952 Dr. 


28 














Rosen was editor of the Journal of 
the History of Medicine; he has been 
the editor of the American Journal of 
Public Health since 1957. 

Dr. Solomon S. Schwartz, a noted 
authority on gastrointestinal radiol¬ 
ogy, has been named professor of 
radiology and chief of the Section 
of Diagnostic Radiology. Some of his 
plans for the section are described 
on page 4. 

Dr. Schwartz, who received his 
B.A. degree from Boston College in 
1943 and his M.D. degree from Tufts 
College in 1940, was most recently 
on the faculty of the New York Uni¬ 
versity School of Medicine. 

Dr. Thomas }. Krizek has been ap¬ 
pointed associate professor in the 
Department of Surgery and chief of 
the Division of Plastic Surgery. A 
former member of the medical fac¬ 
ulty of Johns Hopkins, Dr. Krizek is 
an authority in the field of recon¬ 
structive surgery and has done ex¬ 
tensive research in aspects of surgi¬ 
cal bacteriology, including the care 
and treatment of burns and skin 
transplants, and reconstructive sur¬ 
gery on the aging. 

Additional faculty appointments 
and promotions, effective July 1, will 
be announced in the fall issue. 

Anesthesiology Department 
Holds Two-Day Reunion 

Former residents of the Anesthesi¬ 
ology Section, together with mem¬ 
bers of the present staff, convened 
in New Haven on Friday, May 23rd, 
and Saturday, May 24th, for two 
days of interchange on new concepts 
relating to patient care. 

Sixty-six visitors and their wives 
were ushered through newly avail¬ 
able facilities including the pediat¬ 
ric and adult intensive care areas, 
the obstetrical suite, and the pain 
clinic, with explanatory material 
provided by Drs. Etsuro Motoyama, 
James I. Oilman, and Robert I. 
Schrier, assistant professors of anes¬ 
thesiology. The group also heard 
from Dr. Frederick W. Hehre, asso¬ 
ciate professor of anesthesiology, 
and Dr. H. Arto Abrahamian, assis¬ 


tant professor of anesthesiology. 
The tour was followed by a case 
presentation by Drs. Schrier and 
Stanley E. Maytszewski. An audi¬ 
ence of over 100 met for cocktails 
and dinner at the Kline Biology 
Tower and to hear the guest speak¬ 
er, Professor James P. Payne of the 
research department of anesthetics 
of the Royal College of Surgeons of 
England, describe the medico-legal 
aspects of medical practice in Brit¬ 
ain today. 

Saturday, while wives toured the 
University, a seminar, with brief 
commentary on this year’s research 
work by staff members, was held in 
the Peters-Darrow Room. Anesthesi¬ 
ology’s first reunion concluded with 
a luncheon for alumni and their 
wives at the Hamden home of Dr. 
Nicholas M. Greene, professor of 
anesthesiology, and Mrs. Greene, 
but the success of the debut pres¬ 
ages a repetition of the performance 
in the future. 



Harry S. N. Greene, M. D. 

On February 14, Yale lost one of the 
most distinguished members of its 
medical faculty and the chairman of 
its Department of Pathology, Dr. 
Harry Sylvestre Nutting Greene. He 
died after a lengthy illness which 
had its onset in July of 1968 while 
he was on vacation in Maine. 

A native of Woonsocket, Rhode 
Island, Dr. Greene attended Brown 
University and received his M.D. 
degree from McGill University in 
1930. After a year at the Pathological 


Institute at McGill, he joined the 
staff of the Rockefeller Institute for 
Medical Research. His ten years with 
the Rockefeller Institute were ex¬ 
tremely productive for it was there 
that he began his investigation of 
tissue transplantation and its appli¬ 
cation to cancer. In 1941 Dr. Greene 
came to Yale at the invitation of Dr. 
Milton C. Winternitz as associate 
professor of pathology and surgery. 
He was promoted to professor of 
pathology in 1943 and was appointed 
to the Anthony N. Brady Professor¬ 
ship of Pathology, succeeding Dr. 
Winternitz, in 1950. 

As a memorial tribute to Dr. 
Greene, the School of Medicine 
Board of Permanent Officers passed 
the following resolution: 

“Many of Harry S. N. Greene’s 
colleagues will affectionately re¬ 
member him as an imaginative, pro¬ 
vocative, creative, and profound 
thinker, who loved to stimulate dis¬ 
cussions often by assuming contro¬ 
versial or seemingly untenable 
positions. The impact of his multi¬ 
faceted personality upon his sen¬ 
ior and junior colleagues, the house 
staff, and medical students was pro¬ 
found and most influential in the 
history of the Yale Medical School. 
Up to the last months of his life 
Harry Greene preserved his youth¬ 
fulness by rebelling against all pos¬ 
sible dogmas and by fighting for 
what he believed to be just. To his 
equals and administrative superiors 
he was a fighting terror; but to his 
juniors he was a benign protector. 

“Harry Greene was an ideal de¬ 
partmental chairman. He considered 
the Department of Pathology as a 
department of independent units or 
sections. His role as chairman, as 
he often stated, was to help his col¬ 
leagues and to protect them from 
administrative burdens. He gave to 
the members of the department 
complete freedom and unrestricted 
authority, expecting only responsi¬ 
bility in return. He disliked servility, 
stuffiness, and flattery and firmly 
believed in the free expression of 
one’s views. This, on occasion, re- 


29 



suited in disagreements and heated 
discussions within the department. 
Yet the members of the department 
were closely united in purpose. 

“From the introductory lecture in 
the pathology course, the student 
immediately realized that Harry 
Greene was not the usual type of 
professor. The students’ inquisitive 
minds were continuously chal¬ 
lenged, their imaginations were stim¬ 
ulated, and they were encouraged to 
question everything and everybody, 
not excluding the Professor, himself. 
His door was always open to the 
students and they came to him with 
personal or professional problems. 
Harry was the students’ best friend, 
showing them kindness and an inex¬ 
haustible patience that would have 
surprised those who did not know 
him well. If a student got into aca¬ 
demic difficulties he could count on 
Dr. Greene’s support, and Harry al¬ 
ways assumed the role of defender 
before the administration of the 
school. 

“Through his investigations, uti¬ 
lizing transplantation techniques of 
normal, embryonic, and neoplastic 
tissues, Harry Greene achieved na¬ 
tional and international recognition 
and renown. As a reflection of his 
basic personality, his investigative 
approaches, his working hypotheses, 
and his concepts were imaginative, 
creative and unorthodox. He had 
the great man’s instinct for broad 
problems rather than details. To the 
many students and colleagues who 
studied with him, he shared in a 
most generous manner all the re¬ 
sources of his laboratories and al¬ 
lowed them all the freedom they 
desired in pursuing their research. 
He never interfered, controlled, or 
put any pressure on any of his close 
associates. If advice was wanted, it 
was always given most generously. 

“His loss is profoundly felt, es¬ 
pecially by those who knew him as 
a human being. Behind his famous 
down-to-earth appearance and his 
modest exterior, there was a sensi¬ 
tive, refined, and most compassion¬ 
ate man.” 


Dr. Greene is survived by his wife, 
Jean, and three daughters, Judy, Su¬ 
san, and Melissa. At the request of 
his family, the Harry S. N. Greene 
Memorial Fund for Research and 
Scholarships in the Department of 
Pathology has been established at 
the School of Medicine. 

Max Caplan, M. D. 

Max Caplan, a clinical associate in 
medicine, died in Lisbon, Spain, on 
December 6, 1968. 

Born in New Haven, Dr. Caplan 
graduated from Yale in 1929 and 
received his M.D. degree from the 
University of Louisville School of 
Medicine in 1933. He interned at the 
Louisville City Hospital and trained 
in internal medicine and gastroen¬ 
terology at Montefiore and Mount 
Sinai Hospitals in New York City. 
Until the time of his death, Dr. Cap¬ 
lan practiced internal medicine and 
gastroenterology in Meriden, Con¬ 
necticut. He was former chief of 
medicine at the Meriden Hospital, 
former chief of staff at the World 
War II Veterans Memorial Hospital 
in Meriden, and consultant in gas¬ 
troenterology at the Rocky Hill Vet¬ 
erans Hospital and at the Bradley 
Memorial Hospital in Southington, 
Connecticut. He had served as a 
member of the part-time faculty of 
the Yale School of Medicine since 
1950. 

Dr. Caplan had for years been ac¬ 
tive in his county and state medical 
societies. He was a past president 
of the New Haven County Medical 
Association and at the time of his 
death was vice-president of the 
Connecticut State Medical Society 
and an AMA delegate from Connec¬ 
ticut. 

He is survived by his wife, Evelyn, 
and his brother, Dr. Henry Caplan 
of Rocky Hill, Connecticut. 

Lewis Chandler Foster, M.D. 

Dr. Lewis Chandler Foster, clinical 
professor emeritus of surgery at the 
Yale School of Medicine and surgical 
consultant to the Department of Uni¬ 
versity Health, died on February 9 
at the age of 72. 



Dr. Foster, who was born in St. HI 
Louis, completed his undergraduate A 
work at the University of Kansas and 
was awarded his M.D. degree from 
the Harvard Medical School in 1923. 

He served an internship at Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital in Boston and his 
residency at the Yale-New Haven 
Hospital. Dr. Foster was professor of 
surgery at the Yale Medical School 
until 1964 when he became emeritus. ; 

He was a member of the American 
Medical Association, the American 
College of Surgeons, the New Eng¬ 
land Surgical Society, and was a 
former president of the Society of 
University Surgeons. 

Dr. Foster is survived by three 
sons, three brothers, and three sis¬ 
ters. 

Wilder Tileston, M.D. 

Dr. Wilder Tileston, David P. Smith 
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Medi- ! 
cine, died at Carmel, California, on I 
May 2, at the age of 94. 

Dr. Tileston, a native of Concord, i 
Massachusetts, was born on Janu- < 
ary 22, 1875. He received his B.A. | 
and M.D. degrees from Harvard in | 
1895 and 1899 respectively, taking j 
his post graduate work at Vienna 
and Graz in Austria. 

After nine years of private prac¬ 
tice in Boston, Dr. Tileston joined 
the faculty of the Yale medical 
school as assistant professor of 
medicine in 1909. He was promoted 
to professor of clinical medicine in 
1919. In 1940 he was named David 
P. Smith Professor of Medicine and 
in 1943 he received emeritus status | 
but continued as lecturer in medi¬ 
cine until 1946. 

In addition to his teaching duties, 

Dr. Tileston was chief of staff at 
Grace Hospital from 1926 to 1929. 

He was consulting physician at 
Meridan and Griffin Hospitals and 
visiting physician at New Haven 
Hospital. 

Dr. Tileston was a member of the 
American Society of Clinical In¬ 
vestigation, the Connecticut State 
Medical Society, and the Interurban 
Clinical Club. 


30 









Alumni News 


1903 

A feature story about CHARLES 
FARR, age 93, recently appeared in 
the Athol (Mass.) Daily News. Dr. 
Farr, who is now living at the Mary 
Manning Walsh Home, 420 East 59th 
Street in New York, (where his wife, 
Helen, is also a resident) was on the 
staff of New York Hospital for sixty 
years, specializing in abdominal sur¬ 
gery. Though he retired three years 
ago, Dr. Farr is still a consultant to 
that hospital and to St. Mary’s Hos¬ 
pital in Bayside, Queens. His son, 
Hollon (Yale College ’39) is a sur¬ 
geon attached to New York and 
Memorial Hospitals and his eldest 
brother Tute, no longer living, was a 
professor of German in Yale College. 


Dr. Farr 

1912 

EDWARD H. KIRSCHBAUM and his 
wife of Santa Barbara, California, 
have recently established a most 
generous endowment, the Edward H. 
Kirschbaum Book Fund, for the pur¬ 
chase of books in the history of sur¬ 
gery, including both original sources 
and supporting works. Dr. Kirsch¬ 
baum has long been a supporter of 
the library and was, from 1959 to 
1963, a trustee of the Associates of 
the Yale Medical Library. Through 
his latest gift, he becomes a life mem¬ 
ber of the Associates. 

1933 

IRVING FRIEDMAN, assistant clini¬ 
cal professor of obstetrics and gyne¬ 
cology, was elected president of the 
medical staff officers of Yale-New 
Haven Hospital at their annual meet¬ 
ing in April. 

1939 

ARTHUR S. TUCKER writes that he 



regrets missing his 30th reunion but, 
on that date in May, he will be in 
Warsaw at the meeting of the Euro¬ 
pean Society of Pediatric Radiology 
where he will present a paper en¬ 
titled “Tumors and Pseudo-tumors of 
the Bladder.” 

1940 

THADDEUS S. DANOWSKI, profes¬ 
sor of medicine and chief of the 
section of endocrinology and metab¬ 
olism at the University of Pittsburgh 
School of Medicine, was the recipi¬ 
ent of the 1968 Alfred furzykowski 
Foundation Award for Medicine. The 
award, which carried with it a medal 
and a stipend, honors persons who 
have influenced Polish life, art, and 
letters. Dr. Danowski is the author of 
a number of books on medical sub¬ 
jects. In addition to his teaching 
schedule at the medical school, he is 
senior staff physician at Presbyteri- 
an-University, Magee-Womans, Chil¬ 
dren’s, and Shadyside Hospitals. 



Dr. Danowski 


PAUL D. MacLEAN delivered the 
Clarence Hincks Memorial Lectures 
at Queen’s University, Kingston, On¬ 
tario, this year’s host to the lectures. 
Dr. MacLean, who is chief of the 
Section of Limbic Integration and 
Behavior at the Laboratory of Neuro¬ 
physiology of the National Institute 
of Mental Health in Bethesda, Mary¬ 
land, spoke on the general topic of 
“The Brain and Behavior.” In his 
series of three lectures, Dr. Mac- 
Lean spoke on “Man’s Reptilian and 
Limbic Inheritance”; “Man's Limbic 
Brain and the Psychoses”; and “New 
Trends in Man’s Evolution.” 

1942 

We have received news of the mar¬ 
riage of ROBERT ERNST CARROLL 
to the former Mrs. Jane Chase Clay. 
Dr. Carroll is attending orthopedic 
surgeon at Columbia Presbyterian 
Medical Center and associate profes¬ 
sor of clinical orthopedic surgery at 
the College of Physicians and Sur¬ 
geons. His first wife, Harriet, died 
some time ago. 

CHARLES R. HARMS and his wife, 
Aileen, (Yale School of Nursing, 
1940) visited their son-in-law Tom 
and his wife, Nancy, in Thailand. The 
Harms’managed to sandwich in stop¬ 
overs in Hawaii, Japan, Calcutta, 
Cairo, Athens, and Rome. The Harms 
live at 363 Park Street, Upper Mont¬ 
clair, N.J. 07043. 

1943 

J. PHILIP LOGE was appointed to 
the post of director of the San Ber¬ 
nardino County General Hospital in 



Dr. Norman Sears ('40), on 
right, studies the day’s in¬ 
structional itinerary with 
Dr. Richard Liliard (hs ’67) 
in the pharmaceutical sec¬ 
tion of the S.S. HOPE. The 
HOPE has recently com¬ 
pleted a ten-month medical 
teaching mission in 
Columbo, Ceyion. 


31 











October. The hospital and the UCLA 
School of Medicine are engaged in a 
joint program of medical education 
with particular emphasis on the train¬ 
ing of the new family physician spe¬ 
cialist. 

1944 

ROBERT E. COOKE was editor with 
Dr. Sidney Levin of The Biologic 
Basis of Pediatric Practice published 
in two volumes by McGraw-Hill 
Book Company in 1968. A recent re¬ 
view in the JAMA commented: “The 
appearance of this massive work af¬ 
ter years of preparation represents a 
major publishing milestone in pediat¬ 
rics. It is the stated intent of the edi¬ 
tors to relate the basic science aspect 
of pediatrics to clinical practice, and 
the book is a natural outgrowth of 
the expanding productive basic re¬ 
search in pediatrics.” 


Dr. Cooke 

Dr. Cooke, who is Given Foun¬ 
dation Professor of Pediatrics and 
director of the department at the 
Johns Hopkins University School of 
Medicine, is a member of the Presi¬ 
dent’s Committee on Mental Retarda¬ 
tion and the National Advisory Child 
Health and Human Development 
Council of the National Institutes 
of Health. He has recently been 
appointed a medical consultant to 
the National Foundation-March of 
Dimes. Last year Dr. Cooke received 
the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., Founda¬ 
tion International Leadership Award 
for his outstanding contributions in 
the field of mental retardation. 

1946 

SANFURD G. BLUESTEIN was re¬ 
cently elected president of the Pas¬ 
saic Valley Health Facilities Planning 




Dr. Bluestein 

Council which has jurisdiction over 
three counties in New Jersey. Pur¬ 
pose of the council is to examine 
health facilities in the region and pro¬ 
vide for the total community needs 
by coordinating hospital and health 
facilities. Dr. Bluestein is assistant 
professor of radiology at Mount Sinai 
Medical School in New York City, 
attending radiologist at the Barnett 
Hospital in Paterson and at the Chil¬ 
ton Hospital in Pompton Plains. He 
is also radiological consultant to the 
Paterson Board of Health and the 
American Cyanamid Corporation in 
Wayne. 

1947 

ROBERT SCHWARTZ has been 
named acting chairman of the De¬ 
partment of Pediatrics at Case-West¬ 
ern Reserve University School of 
Medicine. He will continue in the 
position of director of pediatrics 
at Cleveland Metropolitan General 
Hospital, professor of pediatrics at 
Case-Western Reserve and associate 
pediatrician at Babies and Childrens 
Hospital of University Hospital. He 


Dr. Schwarlz 


had previously been associated with 
the Boston Children’s Hospital and 
the Harvard Medical School. 

1949 

LAWRENCE E. SHULMAN, profes¬ 
sor of rheumatology at the Johns 
Hopkins University School of Medi¬ 
cine, was one of several guest faculty 
members who participated in an In¬ 
ternational Symposium on Systemic 
Lupus Erythematosus held at the 
Mayo Clinic. The symposium hon¬ 
ored Dr. Malcolm M. Hargraves, a 
member of the Mayo Clinic staff who 
is retiring this year and who de¬ 
scribed the LE cell twenty years ago. 

1950 

SIDNEY S. LEE, Associate Dean for 
Hospital Programs at the Harvard 
Medical School, has passed on por¬ 
tions of a letter from classmate LYAL 
ASAY in which the latter reports: 
“As you can see, I am still with the 
Permanente Medical Group, having 
been here more or less for 15 years. 
We have been active in a variety of 
community projects, as well as doing 
extensive exploration of the back 
country and back-packing in such 
areas as the Sierra Nevadas and 
Grand Canyon, Olympic National 
Park, and such areas. My children 
are growing up too. My oldest boy, 
Mike, is a sophomore at the local 
junior college; my oldest daughter, 
Patsy, is in Beloit College, Wiscon¬ 
sin, and the other three — Frank is 
in high school and the two girls, Dee- 
Dee and Faith, are in junior high. I 
still attend at the Los Angeles Chil¬ 
drens Hospital and Los Angeles 
County General Hospital. Next year 
we plan to spend a year in Peru, as a 
visiting professor under the auspices 
of the People to People Founda¬ 
tion . . .” 

1952 

Greetings from the University of Cal¬ 
ifornia School of Medicine at San 
Diego were received from MARVIN 
GOLDBERG and his wife, Joyce. The 
Goldbergs write: “This has been a 
wonderful year of activity associated 
with the growth of our medical group 
and UCSD Med School We now are. 
the proud owner of two horses. I 
have a pinto of my own and enjoy 
riding on the beach. We’re getting an 
urge to return East this year and 



32 







hope to see you.” The Goldbergs’ ad¬ 
dress is: 9705 Blackgold Road, La 
Jolla, California 92037. 

1953 

CLAUDE BLOCH was made a fel¬ 
low of the American College of 
Radiology at their annual meeting 
in Chicago in February. Dr. Bloch 
is a member of the staff of Mount 
Sinai Hospital and Medical School 
in New York City. 

REX B. CONN, JR., has issued a new 
edition of Current Diagnosis, a vol¬ 
ume he co-edited with Dr. Howard F. 
Conn in 1966. Current Diagnosis 2 in¬ 
cludes new procedures and criteria 
in diagnosis for more than 300 dis¬ 
eases and, like the previous volume, 
is composed of contributions from 
eminent practitioners who are spe¬ 
cialists in the areas they have de¬ 
scribed. 

1955 

CLEMENT B. SLEDGE has been pro¬ 
moted to associate professor of or¬ 
thopedic surgery at the Harvard 
Medical School. He is also assistant 
orthopedic surgeon at Massachusetts 
General Hospital. 

1959 

A ‘‘Yale in Japan” alumni reunion oc¬ 
curred in Tokyo when CONSTANCE 
CONIGLIO AZZI and her husband, 
Victor (D. Eng Yale ’61], travelled 
to the Orient for an International 
Congress on Rheology. The Azzis 


met with Drs. Shinichi Sugawara 
and Akitsugu Ojima, all of whom 
were studying at Yale in 1961. Dr. 
Azzi is now on the faculty of the 
University of New Hampshire. Dr. 
Ojima is presently chairman of the 
Department of Pathology at Gifu 
University and Dr. Sugawara is a 
research scientist with Samkyo In¬ 
dustries in Tokyo. 

SIDNEY COHEN and family write 
that they are fast becoming native 
Clevelandites and have found their 
dream house at 2456 Brian Drive, 
Beachwood, Ohio 44121. 

GERALD FENICHEL was appointed 
professor and chairman of the De¬ 
partment of Neurology at Vanderbilt 
University School of Medicine, to 
take effect July 1. For the past five 
years, he has had an appointment 



Dr. Ojima, the Azzis and Dr. Sugawara in 
front of the Olympics building in Tokyo. 



as associate professor of neurology 
at George Washington University 
School of Medicine and on the staff 
of the Children’s Hospital of the Dis¬ 
trict of Columbia as associate neurol¬ 
ogist to the Research Foundation. 

A Christmas note from the DAVID 
SKINNERs indicates that they are 
enjoying life at their new home, 8307 
Carrbridge Circle, Towson, Maryland 
21204. Dr. Skinner is writing, teach¬ 
ing, lecturing, practicing, and doing 
research on artificial heart devices, 
coronary heart disease, and gastro¬ 
esophageal disorders at Johns Hop¬ 
kins. His wife, Elbe, and three 
daughters sound equally happy and 
equally busy. 

MURIEL DuBROW WOLF reports 
that she’s still working as associate 
director of the outpatient department 
at Children’s Hospital and as an asso¬ 
ciate cardiologist and that her hus¬ 
band, Dick, is still with NASA. The 
Wolfs plan to attend the class re¬ 
union in New Haven in May. 

1960 

Through Class Agent THOMAS KU- 
GELMAN, news of several class¬ 
mates is available: ALAN W. AMES 
has opened his own office at 2311 
N.W. Northrup Street, Portland, Ore¬ 
gon 97210, for the practice of cardi¬ 
ology and internal medicine. He 
holds an appointment as clinical in¬ 
structor in medicine at the University 
of Oregon Medical School. 

JAMES I. GILMAN was married to 
the former Patricia Crane of London, 
England, and New Haven, on March 
2, 1968. After a trip to England to 
meet his in-laws, he and his wife 
have settled down at 10 Linden Point 
Road, Stony Creek, Connecticut. 
EDWARD R. LANG writes from the 
USAF Hospital, Keesler Air Force 
Base, Biloxi, Mississippi, “I will com¬ 
plete my tour of duty with the USAF 
on July 5, 1969. During the past year 
I have served as chief of neurosur¬ 
gery . . . The experience here at this 
400-bed teaching hospital has been 
interesting and invaluable as a step¬ 
ping stone to private practice. In 
July, my family (wife, two sons, 
and a daughter] and I will move to 
Fairfax, Virginia. On July 15th I’ll 
begin private practice of neurologi¬ 
cal surgery with two other men in 
Falls Church, Virginia, just outside 


33 



of Washington. I am a member of 
the Congress of Neurological Sur¬ 
geons and the Fairfax County Medi¬ 
cal Society.” 

1961 

A Christmas letter from the DIER- 
WECHTERs at the Mission Metho- 
diste in Station D’ll-Maten, Algeria, 
reports that on November 30, twin 
girls, Natasha and Miya, joined the 
family of RON, Jewell, Tatiana, and 
Yonn. 

PHILIP FELIG, who will return to 
Yale as an assistant professor of 
medicine in July, has been appoint¬ 
ed American College of Physicians 
and Teaching and Research Scholar 
for 1969 through 1972. He has also 
received the Research and Develop¬ 
ment Award of the American Dia¬ 
betes Association “designed to as¬ 
sist exceptionally promising young 
investigators in their transition to 
the level of established investiga¬ 
tors.” 

Dr. Felig was chief resident in 
medicine at Yale-New Haven Hos¬ 
pital in 1966-1967. During the past 
two years he has been a research fel¬ 
low at the Elliott P. Joslin Research 
Laboratory in Boston, Massachu¬ 
setts. 

1966 

ELI NEWBERGER writes from Up¬ 
per Volta on the west coast of Africa 
where he is stationed as a physician 
in the Peace Corps: .. Ougadougou 
is now appallingly hot and beginning 
to feel the wave of meningitis cases 
from neighboring Mali, where a full- 
scale epidemic is underway. Further, 
a measles epidemic, the CDC/AID 
vaccination efforts notwithstanding, 
is doing its share of cropping the 
enormous malnourished preschool 
population. The control of disease in 
this milieu seems to me to be an in¬ 
creasingly overwhelming problem; 
without water and adequate protein, 
in as inauspicious a climate as could 
be imagined, the high fertility/high 
mortality combination determines a 
feeling that nothing short of an enor¬ 
mous transfusion of aid could exalt 
the value of human life. As I reach 
the home stretch of my tour, I both 
dread and welcome the challenge of 
coming back . . 

1968 

A note from DONALD H. STAN¬ 


FORD indicates that he is enjoying 
San Francisco and a residency at 
Mount Zion Hospital. He is also 
pleased to have discovered a surgeon 
who shares his interest in medical 
history and who has regular meet¬ 
ings at his home for others who share 
this interest. 

JOHN A. OGDEN, interne in the Yale 
Department of Surgery, has just won 
the Young Investigator’s Award of 
the American College of Cardiology 



for his paper entitled “Congenital 
Variations of the Coronary Arteries.” 
Dr. Ogden had been one of the five 
finalists and his paper was selected 
and read at the 18th annual scientific 
session held at the New York Hilton 
Hotel from February 26 - March 2. In 
addition to a medal, the award in¬ 
cludes the publication of the winning 
manuscript in the American Journal 
of Cardiology. 

PUBLIC HEALTH 
1930 

RUTH E. GROUT has retired as 
professor of health education at the 
School of Public Health of the Uni¬ 
versity of Minnesota, and has moved 
to North Carolina. 

1938 

RICHARD K.C. LEE, who is dean 
of the School of Public Health at the 
University of Hawaii, made the wel¬ 
coming introduction for the 1969 His- 
cock Lecture given by Representa¬ 
tive Dorothy L. Devereaux of the 
State legislature. These lectures hon¬ 
or Dr. Ira V. Hiscock (’21 M.P.H.J for 
his contributions to public health in 
Hawaii. Dr. Hiscock is professor 
emeritus of public health at Yale. 


1947 

CECIL G. SHEPS is now director of 
the Health Services Research Cen¬ 
ter at the University of North Caro¬ 
lina. Formerly, Dr. Sheps was the 
general director of the Beth Israel 
Medical Center in New York City. 
He was recently awarded a special 
certificate by the Association of 
University Programs in Hospital 
Administration in recognition of 
“. . . distinguished service to grad¬ 
uate education for hospital and 
health administration and as Direc¬ 
tor of the Graduate Program in 
hospital administration at the Uni¬ 
versity of Pittsburgh.” 

1950 

CONSTANCE AUSTIN BEAN, in 
between duties as a housewife, is 
engaged in part-time work as a 
health educator for the Martha Eliot 
Family Health Center and for the 
Medical Foundation in Boston on 
projects concerned with education 
on childbirth. 

NATHAN M. SIMON has been 
named director of psychiatry at the 
Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, Mis¬ 
souri. 

1951 

PAUL S. ANDERSON, JR., has been 
appointed professor and chairman, 
Department of Biostatistics and 
Epidemiology at the University of 
Oklahoma Medical Center’s School 
of Health in Oklahoma City. 

ROBERT L. JOHNSON, formerly 
vice-president for undergraduate af- j 
fairs at the University of Kentucky, 
has accepted an appointment as vice- 
chancellor for student affairs at the 
University of California at Berkeley. 1 
ALVIN H. KANE is an epidemiol¬ 
ogist with the Bureau of Prevent¬ 
able Diseases of the New York City 
Department of Health. 

JAMES M. A. WEISS, professor 
and chairman of the Department of 
Psychiatry at the University of 
Missouri School of Medicine in Co¬ 
lumbia, is currently on leave and is 
a visiting professor at Cambridge 
University, England. He was re¬ 
cently elected a fellow of the Royal 
Society of Health. 

1954 

MILTON W. HAMILT is resigning 
his position as executive vice-presi- 


34 






dent of the Lenox Hill Hospital in 
New York to accept an appointment 
as professor of health administra¬ 
tion at Temple University, effective 
July 1, 1969. 

1956 

PAUL KAUFMAN, a lieutenant 
colonel in the U.S. Army, is the 
executive officer of Darnell Army 
Hospital at Fort Hood, Texas. 

1960 

R. JOHN C. PEARSON and his fam¬ 
ily have returned to the United States 
after several years in England. Dr. 
Pearson was associated with the 
medical care research unit at the Uni¬ 
versity of Manchester. He is current¬ 
ly on the faculty of the Department 
of Preventive Medicine at the Har¬ 
vard Medical School. 

1961 

EDWARD A. JANASZ has been ap¬ 
pointed assistant administrator of 
St. Joseph’s Hospital in Providence, 
Rhode Island. Prior to this appoint¬ 
ment, he was associated with the 
Park City Hospital in Bridgeport, 
Connecticut. 

1964 

EUGENE SCHOENFELD is a staff 
physician with the student health 
service at the University of Califor¬ 
nia at Berkeley. Since March of 1967 
he has been writing a column of med¬ 
ical advice for the Berkeley Barb 
under the name “Dr. Hip Pocrates.” 
A collection of these columns — 
which include letters from readers 
and Dr. Schoenfeld’s answers — has 
appeared in book form under the 
title “Dear Dr. Hip Pocrates: Advice 
Your Doctor Never Gave You,” and 
has created nationwide interest. The 
“surgeon general of the sandal-and- 
speed set,” as Time magazine calls 
Dr. Schoenfeld, directs his advice 
entirely toward the long-haired gen¬ 
eration, whose questions range from 
the possibility of harmful effects of 
marijuana on pregnant women to 
the relationship between orgasms 
and sneezes. The doctor's answers 
are medically sound and delightfully 
humorous. He warns his hippie cli¬ 
entele against “street drugs” with 
their impurities, has little good to 
say about amphetamines, inveighs 
against fad diets and fasting, and 
harangues his readers to get VD 


check-ups. Freedom demands re¬ 
sponsibility, he says, so “Do your 
thing — but only if it does not harm 
yourself or others.” 

1967 

JAMES M. MALLOY was recently 
appointed an assistant administrator 
at the Waterbury Hospital. He will be 
concerned with administration in the 
areas of pharmacy, laboratories, ra¬ 
diology, and the psychiatric clinic. 
Previously Mr. Malloy had served as 
assistant to the director at Yale-New 
Haven Hospital. He is currently 
treasurer of the Yale Hospital Ad¬ 
ministration Alumni Association. 



1968 

JOSEPH L. DORSEY was recently 
appointed director of medical plan¬ 
ning for the Harvard Community 
Health Plan, a new university-spon¬ 
sored medical care program. Dr. Dor¬ 
sey received his M.D. degree from 
the Harvard Medical School and 
completed his postgraduate training 
in internal medicine at the Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital. 


Dr. Dorsey 


SHERWIN MELLINS has been 
named chief, Maternal and Child 
Health Section, Community Health 
Division of the Connecticut Depart¬ 
ment of Health in Hartford. 

HOUSE STAFF 
1948 

C. HENRY KEMPE is co-editor with 
Dr. Ray E. Heifer, of The Battered 
Child (University of Chicago Press). 
This book examines a syndrome of 
critical importance today. Studies 
range from early historical abuse of 
the helpless to current discussion of 
the problem from the points of view 
of therapist, social worker, pedia¬ 
trician, and others who daily see 
child victims of adult abuse. 

1954 

GOVERNOR WITT has been as¬ 
signed by the American Academy 
of Pediatrics to serve as pediatric 
consultant to the Head Start Pro¬ 
gram in Orange County, Florida. Dr. 
Witt, who practices in West Palm 
Beach, is a Fellow of the Academy, 
and an associate clinical professor 
in the Department of Pediatrics and 
Endocrinology at the University of 
Miami School of Medicine. In addi¬ 
tion, he is vice chairman of the 
Florida Crippled Children’s Com¬ 
mission. 

1960 

EDWARD S. FLEMING of Wash¬ 
ington, D.C. has been selected to 
receive the Golden Plate Award of 
the American Academy of Achieve¬ 
ment for his contributions in the 
held of psychiatry. Dr. Fleming is 
being cited for his efforts in broad¬ 
ening community awareness of the 
problems of psychiatric patients as 
well as for his work in perfecting 
the techniques of out-patient clinics. 
The Academy, whose headquarters 
is in Dallas, Texas, annually selects 
fifty leaders from all fields of en¬ 
deavor and service as recipients of 
its award. 


Picture Credits Tom McCarthy: cover; Kate 
Swift: pp. 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 14 (top), 17, 24 (below), 
26; Lois M. Kopp: p. 8; A.Burton Street: pp. 12, 
13, 20, 21, 22; Chestnut Street Studios, Philadel¬ 
phia: p. 14 (bottom); R. U. Light/Yale Medical 
Library: p. 23; Yale University News Bureau: 
pp. 23 (top), 24, 28, 29; Constance Brewster: p. 26 
(below); Pat Doyle: p. 31; Associated Photog¬ 
rapher: p. 31; Del Ankers: pp. 31, 33; Johns Hop¬ 
kins University: p. 32; Alvin Morris: p. 32; Uni¬ 
versity Medical Center, Cleveland: p. 32; Mon- 
gillo's Studio: p. 34. 



35 














GOING TO THE AMA NATIONAL CONVENTION 
IN NEW YORK CITY? 


Come to the Yale Alumni in Medicine Cocktail Party 
Monday, July 14, from 5:30 to 7:30 P.M. 

Yale Club of New York City, 44th Street and Vanderbilt Avenue 

All alumni in medicine, wives, husbands, 
and their guests are cordially invited. 


YALE MEDICINE 


333 Cedar Street 


New Haven, Conn. 06510 


NON-PROFIT ORG. 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

New Haven, Conn. 
Permit No. 8 


ARE YOU MOVING IN JULY? 

Please send us your new address so that the mailing list for 

YALE MEDICINE 
can be kept up to date 








YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE / FALL 1969 











COVER: A bright autumn morning on Cedar Street, as first-year students 
begin the long course toward the M.D. degree. The members of the class 
of 1973, with their colleges and home towns, are listed on page 19. 








YALE MEDICINE 

ALUMNI BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE / FALL 1969 / VOL. 4 NO. 3 


Contents 

The Veterans Administration Hospital 2 

Alumni Day 1969 7 

Advances in Otolaryngology 9 

Capital Fund Campaign 13 

Anatomist and Medical Historian 14 

The First-Year Class 19 

New York Cocktail Party 20 

A Report from the Dean 22 

In and About Sterling Hall 24 

Alumni News 32 

Alumni Fund Annual Report 37 


YALE MEDICINE is published three times a year — in the fall, winter, and 
spring — and is distributed to members of the Association of Yale Alumni in 
Medicine, students, and others interested in the School of Medicine. Com¬ 
munications may be addressed to The Editor, Room L200, 333 Cedar Street, 
New Haven, Connecticut. 06510. 


Editor Arthur Ebbert, Jr., M.D. 

Managing Editor Kate Swift 

Assistant Managing Editor Anne S. Bittker 

Designer Sarah P. Sullivan 

Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 

George A. Carden, II, M.D., '35, President 
Malvin F. White, M.D., '39, Vice-President 
Robert F. Bradley, Jr., M.D., ’43, Secretary 
Benjamin Castleman, M.D., ’31, Past President 

Executive Committee 

Robert R. Berneike, M.D., ’46hs 
Michael D'Amico, M.D., '31 
Walter S. Morgan, M.D., ’51 
John B. Ogilvie, M.D., ’34 
Michael A. Puzak, M.D., ’42 
Ralph A. Ross, M.D., ’40hs 
Richmond W. Smith, Jr., M.D., ’42 
Samuel B. Webb, Jr., M.P.H. '63 








The Veterans Administration Hospital 


W hen Dean Francis Blake accepted the Newington 
Veterans Administration Hospital as an affiliated 
hospital in 1946, it was only as a temporary liaison, since 
a new hospital was to be built in West Haven, about 35 
miles closer to the medical school. 

The new hospital, built on the site of the former 
William Wirt Winchester Hospital, consists of a 500-bed 
General Medical and Surgical Building and a 400-bed 
Tuberculosis Building. The older buildings linking the 
two new structures were refurbished and became the 
Administration Building. The whole complex, set in 43 
acres, rose above a commanding hill, dominating West 
Haven ‘‘like a colossus.” 

In April, 1953, the West Haven Veterans Administra¬ 
tion Hospital opened the doors of the Tuberculosis 
Building, and immediately began its association with 
Yale, guided by a Dean’s Committee. The General Medi¬ 
cal and Surgical Building opened in September, 1953. 
With changing times and disease patterns, these two 
major clinical buildings are referred to simply as Build¬ 
ings #1 and #2. 

The hospital is headed by David Anton, the fourth 
director in its 16-year history. The non-professional side 
of the hospital operates under the assistant hospital 
director, Calvin Chandler. Professional programs are the 
responsibility of the chief of staff, Dr. Raymond Yesner, 
who has been chief of the Laboratory Service at West 
Haven since the hospital’s inception, and who is an asso¬ 
ciate professor of pathology at the medical school. As 
chief of staff, he has an advisory group, consisting of the 
various chiefs of services. He is supported by an asso¬ 
ciate chief of staff for administration, Paul Eule, and an 
associate chief of staff for research, Dr. Robert Green, 
professor of medicine. It is expected that another posi¬ 
tion, that of associate chief of staff for education, will 
be filled at some time in the future. Dr. Yesner is also an 
associate dean of the medical school, with the responsi¬ 
bility for Veterans Hospital affairs. 

The Medical Service at the VA Hospital has a model 
relationship with the Department of Internal Medicine 
at Yale and plays a major role in its training programs. 
There are 68 medical beds for acutely ill patients plus a 
six-bed intensive care unit and a four-bed coronary care 
unit. Last year 1,709 patients were admitted to the acute 
medical service. Staffing is provided by eight full-time 
Yale faculty members and two part-time staff physi¬ 
cians. The chief of the Medical Service is Dr. Thomas 
T. Amatruda, Jr., associate professor of medicine. 

Guiding the operation of the West Haven Veterans Administration Hos¬ 
pital are David Anton (left), director, and Dr. Raymond Yesner, chief of 
staff, who is professor of pathology. 



2 













Yale-New Haven Medical Center house staff members 
are assigned in rotation to the Medical Service during 
their internship and residency training. In addition, 
there are specialty training programs in metabolism and 
endocrinology, hematology and oncology, gastroenterol¬ 
ogy, dermatology, and cardiology which complement 
! similar programs at the Yale-New Haven Hospital. 

During the academic year, approximately half the 
third- and fourth-year medical students are assigned to 
West Haven for their clinical clerkships on the acute 
medical wards. Under the new curriculum, many second- 
year students will also receive their initial clinical ex¬ 
perience there. 

First Hemodialysis in State 

In December of 1966, the first successful hospital- 
based hemodialysis program in the entire State of Con¬ 
necticut was started at the West Haven VA Hospital. 
In May of 1968, a modern nine-bed dialysis unit was 
opened for out-patient chronic hemodialysis; at present 
16 patients are involved in the program. In the near 
future it is hoped that the hospital-based unit will be 
supplemented by a home dialysis program to aid in the 
management of some patients who currently travel as 
far as 85 miles twice a week for their dialysis. 

In addition to the responsibilities of patient care and 
teaching, the full-time staff are actively engaged in clin¬ 
ical and laboratory research in the areas of infectious 
j diseases, metabolism and endocrinology, renal disease, 
cardiovascular disease, liver disease, gastroenterology, 
oncology, and hematology. 

The Surgical Service has a 179-bed capacity. Approx- 
j imately 100 of these beds are for the various surgical 
specialties. Each of the specialty services is under the 
direction of the head of the specialty section at Yale. 

The General Surgical Service has a new chief, Dr. 
Edward Storer, professor of surgery, and two full-time 
and three part-time surgeons who have faculty appoint¬ 
ments. 

The VA surgical program functions as an integral part 
of the Department of Surgery at Yale. There is complete 
I integration of the intern and resident training programs, 
and an active student teaching program has been estab¬ 
lished. Staff members devote a major part of their time 
! to the teaching of residents, interns, and medical stu¬ 
dents. The Surgical Service also has frequent consulta¬ 
tion with university surgeons for both teaching and 
patient care, and surgeons from the medical school 
attend on the wards on a rotating schedule. 


A new operating room recovery room and a ten-bed 
intensive care unit have recently been completed and 
are in operation. The intensive care unit, which has two 
isolation cubicles, is equipped with modern monitoring 
devices. 

The Pathology Service is a centralized operation com¬ 
bining pathologic anatomy and clinical pathology in one 
department; thus the residency training program leads 
to combined Board certification. In addition to Dr. Yes- 
ner, there are four full-time pathologists and a research 
associate. Pathologic anatomy is very well equipped with 
double-headed teaching microscopes, cryostats, an ex¬ 
cellent new electron microscope suite, histology and 
histochemistry laboratories, and closed circuit television 
for autopsies and the tumor clinics. The clinical pathol¬ 
ogy workload has been growing steadily at about 25 per 
cent per year and now stands at well over a million tests 
annually. This is handled by extensive automation, with 
20 analyzer channels operating continuously in chem¬ 
istry and a 7-channel analyzer in hematology. The bac¬ 
teriology laboratories are among the finest in the country 
and receive many students for training. The tuberculosis 
bacteriology laboratory has contributed much original 
research and is scheduled to become a regional labora¬ 
tory, along with two others in the country, to do defini¬ 
tive identification work on typical and atypical isolated 
organisms. Blood banking, serology, mycology, and para¬ 
sitology laboratories complete the spectrum. Residents 
are also trained in the use of radioisotopes and selected 
residents may spend six months in the clinical chemistry 
laboratory at Yale-New Haven Hospital. 

Community Mental Health Service 

The Psychiatry Service has been an integral compo¬ 
nent of the Yale department since 1953. Under Dr. Louis 
B. Fierman, associate professor of clinical psychiatry, it 
now consists of 123 beds, four acute treatment wards, a 
day hospital and mental hygiene clinic, and a staff of 
eight psychiatrists. It functions as a community mental 
health service and processes annually over 800 appli¬ 
cants for admission, of whom about half are referred 
to other community facilities. There are no locked or 
chronic wards. 

The Psychiatry Service provides a first-year residency 
training program in cooperation with the Yale Depart¬ 
ment of Psychiatry. Second- and third-year residency 
training is also available. Since 1953 the Psychiatry Ser¬ 
vice has trained 193 residents and, in collaboration with 
the Veterans Administration Psychology Service, 119 


3 





The two clinical buildings of the hospital, completed in 1953, flank the older structures which now house administrative offices and research facilities. 


psychology trainees. In addition, the Psychiatry Service 
is available to Yale medical students for clerkships and 
elective clinical courses. Training opportunities have 
also been offered to student nurses from the University 
of Connecticut and the University of Bridgeport, and 
ongoing professional training has been provided for so¬ 
cial workers and nurses. Psychosomatic teaching has 
been conducted in collaboration with the Medical and 
Surgical Services. 

The psychiatric research program has had a strong 
clinical orientation, in psychotherapy, schizophrenic 
language, the uses of humor, social structure of psychiat¬ 
ric populations, and patient government. Basic research 
in neurophysiology has also been conducted in collabo¬ 
ration with the Psychology Service on cerebral-sensory- 
evoked potentials. 

The Psychology Service is divided into clinical, coun¬ 
seling, and research sections. The clinical section pro¬ 
vides consultation and treatment and assists the Psychi¬ 
atric Service in its treatment programs. The counseling 
section is primarily engaged in vocational guidance, 
rehabilitation counseling, personal adjustment counsel¬ 
ing, and retirement counseling. It also utilizes commu¬ 
nity resources to help the discharged veteran make a 
successful vocational and social readjustment. The ser¬ 
vice is strongly research-oriented, four members spend¬ 
ing a major portion of their time in research. The staff 
is involved in the supervision of graduate and medical 
students' theses and the residents’ projects. Students 
from universities throughout the country come to this 
hospital for training in counseling and neurophysiologi¬ 
cal, social, and experimental psychology. 

Rehabilitation for Orthopedic Patients 

The Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service is 
under the direction of Dr. Frederick Dugdale. It is com¬ 


prised of five therapy sections — physical therapy, occu¬ 
pational therapy, corrective therapy, educationaltherapy, 
and manual arts therapy — that contribute to overcom¬ 
ing physical, educational, and vocational handicaps. 

In recognition of the frequent need of orthopedic pa¬ 
tients for rehabilitation and the need for orthopedic 
surgeons to be better versed in the prescription of re¬ 
habilitation procedures, the service participates actively 
in the training program for residents. In addition, the 
surgical residents are invited to attend monthly pros- j 
thetic clinics, which provide an opportunity for the resi¬ 
dent to correlate his knowledge of amputation surgery 
with the latest developments in prosthetics and the rela¬ 
tionship of both to the patient’s ability to walk again. 

The Chest Disease Service, headed by Dr. Nicholas 
D’Esopo, associate clinical professor of medicine, in¬ 
cludes a non-tuberculosis medical chest ward, a surgical 
chest ward, two tuberculosis wards, an emphysema unit, 
an active out-patient clinic, a pulmonary physiology lab¬ 
oratory, an immunology laboratory, and an inhalation 
therapy department. A one- or two-year training and 
research program, principally located at the VA Hospi¬ 
tal but closely coordinated with Yale-New Haven, offers 
a balanced and flexible program in which a trainee or 
fellow can become an accomplished chest physician and 
pulmonary physiologist. 

When the hospital opened, 400 tuberculosis beds were 
assigned. Due to the nation-wide decrease in tubercu¬ 
losis, there are now only two tuberculosis wards, con¬ 
sisting of 96 beds, staffed by full-time staff physicians. 
The chief of the service is chairman of a cooperative 
chemotherapy trial involving 26 other VA hospitals, and 
the service has been continuously active in chemother¬ 
apy trials since 1953. 

The Intermediate Service is under the direction of Dr. 
William Braisted. It occupies four wards with a total 
bed capacity of 168 and has a full-time staff of six phy- 


4 












sicians. Patients with complicated, usually multisystem 
and progressive chronic disease, too chronic for acute 
wards and too sick for nursing homes, are given chronic 
hospital care, to provide maximum efficiency and plea¬ 
sure in living within the limits of disability. The Service 
coordinates physical, corrective, occupational, speech, 
educational, vocational, psychological, and social ther¬ 
apies. 

The chief of the Dental Service is Dr. John Weimer. 
He is assisted by an oral surgeon and two staff dentists 
in operating a general six-chair clinic and a tuberculosis 
two-chair clinic. Both are equipped with the most mod¬ 
ern dental equipment from high speed units to the pano- 


from Yale-New Haven Hospital rotate through the de¬ 
partment at three-month intervals. In diagnostic radiol¬ 
ogy, the case load has doubled in the last seven years, 
to 30,000 examinations per year. More than 5 per cent of 
these are special studies. Four new diagnostic rooms, to 
be completed by August, 1970, will contain all of the 
most advanced and sophisticated equipment available. 
Complete right and left cardiac catheterizations, trans- 
septal catheterizations, and selective coronary angio¬ 
graphy are now routinely done in our special diagnostic 
suite. In spite of the marked increase in both routine 
examinations and special procedures, our radiologists 
conduct 30 hours of teaching-work conferences weekly 




A seven-channel analyzer performs simultaneous 
counts for white and red blood cells, hemoglobin, 
and various indices required for hematology and 
produces information on a printed card in a frac¬ 
tion of a minute. 


rex x-ray machine, supported by a complete dental lab¬ 
oratory. There is an approved rotating internship and a 
training program for dental assistants affiliated with the 
Eli Whitney Technical School. 

Dr. Dorothea Bradford is chief of the Speech Pathol¬ 
ogy Service, which evaluates and treats language, speech, 
and voice disorders by acoustic amplification and speech 
reading. A training program is conducted in communica¬ 
tive disorders. 

The Department of Radiology, under Dr. Mary F. Keo- 
hane, associate professor of clinical radiology, was com¬ 
pletely reorganized five years ago. A full-time staff of 
five diagnostic radiologists and one radiotherapist is 
| provided, on a contract basis, by Yale. Four residents 

I 

| 


for the interns, residents, and medical students from all 
services. An active research program is maintained with 
project participation in both the Departments of Medi¬ 
cine and Surgery, as well as those areas of particular 
interest to the radiologist. 

Among the exciting new developments in the Depart¬ 
ment of Radiology is the successful establishment of a 
School of Radiologic Technology presently training 18 
students. 

Recently the Eastern Blind Rehabilitation Center for 
the visually impaired veteran was established at West 
Haven, under the supervision of George M. Gillespie. 
This center provides basic adjustment to the losses asso¬ 
ciated with blindness for veterans from the east coast of 


5 



















































At the Eastern BJind Rehabilitation Center, visually impaired 
veterans receive individualized service in an 18-week rehabili¬ 
tation program that includes instruction in communication skills. 


A new surgical intensive care unit, equipped with modern monitoring devices, was 
recently completed. 


■ 

— 

£ 

I 


13 

.3 


the United States. Included in each patient's individual¬ 
ized 18-week program is medical care; training in orien¬ 
tation, mobility, manual skills, and communications; and 
social and vocational counseling. Upon leaving the cen¬ 
ter the veteran is guided toward academic and vocational 
training or returns to the position he held prior to the 
onset of his blindness. 

Eastern Research Support Center 

Another major regional activity is the Eastern Re¬ 
search Support Center under Dr. Alvan Feinstein, pro¬ 
fessor of medicine. This center provides assistance to 
Veterans Administration investigators throughout the 
east in such areas as experimental design, editing, and 
computer assistance. 

The Neurology Service, headed by Dr. Lewis L. Levy, 
associate clinical professor, has recently been separated 
from the Medical Service. New Stroke and Epilepsy Cen¬ 
ters will shortly be operative. 

Under the direction of Arline E. Burns, the Nursing 
Service provides quality nursing care and services to 
patients, both on an in-patient and out-patient basis. 
There are 20 nursing units for the Medicine, Surgery, 
Intermediate, Pulmonary Disease, and Psychiatry Ser¬ 
vices. In addition to these, there are specialized units, 
such as those for coronary care, medical and surgical 


intensive care, post-anesthesia, hemodialysis, day hos¬ 
pital (psychiatric service), mental hygiene clinic, oper-| 
ating room, and the Blind Rehabilitation Center. The 
Nursing Service personnel assigned to the Out-Patient 
Department provide nursing care and services to pa-1 
tients for pre-admission, in-patient clinics, post-hospital 
care, and the community home-nursing referral program. 
Throughout the academic year clinical experience is pro¬ 
vided for nursing students from the University of Bridge-i 
port and the University of Connecticut. 

The research program at the West Haven VA Hospital! 
commenced with the activation of the institution in 1953, 
when many of the staff and projects originally at the 
Newington VA Hospital moved to West Haven. Since 
then, the number of active research projects has in¬ 
creased by 45 per cent; the amount of research space 
available has more than tripled; and publications have 
increased sevenfold. Concurrent with these gains, there 
has been a significant increase in both VA research funds 
and non-VA grant funds. These assets, coupled with the 
proximity of the excellent academic, patient care, andi 
research facilities at the Yale-New Haven Medical Cen-i 
ter, have enabled this VA Hospital to attract not only | 
established, independent investigators, but — equally! 
important — young, eager, intellectually responsive re¬ 
searchers whose future scientific contributions will no 
doubt help mold the shape of patient care in the future. 


6 























Alumni Day 1969 



A dialogue between students and alumni on some controversial issues in medical education was presented in a panel discussion in the Mary S. 
Harkness Auditorium. Participants (from left) were fourth-year students Arnold Mazur, Graeme Fincke, and Garrett Wright; Dr. Darrell G. Voorhees, 
’39, moderator; and D. Ernest L. Sarason, '39, and Dr. Lawrence G. Crowley, ’44. 


R ubella vaccines, treatment of drug abusers, hazards 
of contraceptive methods, and the delivery of med¬ 
ical care were topics of round-table discussions which 
were an innovation at this year’s Medical Alumni Day 
on May 24. Medical and public health graduates and 
former house staff from all parts of the country gath¬ 
ered with their wives (or husbands in some cases) for 
the day-long program which included a surgical con¬ 
ference on chronic renal failure, a demonstration of 
television in medical education, a buffet luncheon, and 
an afternoon meeting of the Association of Yale Alumni 
in Medicine. 

Following a brief business meeting with election of 
officers, the afternoon session proceeded with talks by 
Dean Redlich, Dr. Leona Baumgartner (’34), and Presi¬ 
dent Kingman Brewster, Jr., who at the close of his re¬ 
marks presented a citation to Dr. Benjamin Castleman 


(’31), recognizing his devoted service to the university 
and the medical school in his role as president of the 
Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine from 1967 to 
1969. 

Another innovation at this year’s Alumni Day was 
student participation in the program. A lively panel dis¬ 
cussion — a student-alumni dialogue touching on a 
number of current controversial issues in medical edu¬ 
cation and practice — was skillfully moderated by Dr. 
Darrell G. Voorhees (’39). Other alumni participants 
were Dr. Lawrence G. Crowley (’44) and Dr. Ernest L. 
Sarason (’39). Student speakers from the senior class 
were Graeme Fincke, Arnold Mazur, and Garrett Wright. 

The day’s activities were concluded with the tradi¬ 
tional social hour for alumni, faculty, and guests at Ed¬ 
ward S. Harkness Hall. 



Dr. E. Richard Weinerman, professor of medicine 
and public health, comments on a model of a health 
care delivery system at one of the round-table dis¬ 
cussions in which returning alumni and their wives 
participated. 


7 
















Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine 
Officers 1969-70 


President 

George A. Carden, II, M.D. (’35) 
New York, New York 


Vice-President 

Malvin F. White, M.D. (’39) 

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

Secretary 

Robert F. Bradley, Jr., M.D. (’43) 
Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

Past President 

Benjamin Castleman, M.D. (’31) 
Belmont, Massachusetts 

Executive Committee 
Robert R. Berneike, M.D. (’46hs) 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Michael D’Amico, M.D. (’31) 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Walter S. Morgan, M.D. (’51) 
New Haven, Connecticut 

John B. Ogilvie, M.D. (’34) 
Darien, Connecticut 

Ralph A. Ross, M.D. (’40hs) 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Samuel B. Webb, Jr., MPH (’63) 
Guilford, Connecticut 

Michael A. Puzak, M.D. (’42) 
Arlington, Virginia 



Catching up on one another’s family news on Alumni Day were Dr. David M. Raskind, '24: Dr. 
George A. Carden, II, new president of the Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine; and Dr. 
Nathan E. Ross, '28, and Mrs. Ross. 


Richmond W. Smith, Jr., M.D. (’42) 
Grosse Pointe, Michigan 

Chairman, Medical School Alumni Fund 
Myron E. Wegman, M.D. (’32) 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Representatives to the Alumni Board 
Sawnie R. Gaston, M.D. (’35) 

New York, New York 

Conrad R. Lam, M.D. (’32) 

Detroit, Michigan 

Louis E. Silcox, M.D. (’35) 

Gladwyne, Pennsylvania 


Dean Redlich talks with Dr. Benjamin 
Castieman, ’31, who was cited for his service 
as president of the medical afumni association 
from 1967 to 1969. Dr. Castleman holds the 
citation, which was presented by Yale 
President Kingman Brewster, Jr. 



8 












Advances in Otolaryngology 



Dr. David A. Hilding (right) and his group in the otology laboratory were 
the first to use the electron microscope to study defects of inner ear 
development. Here, he works with Joseph Craft, electron microscopist, 
who recently discovered virus-like particles in the nerve cells that supply 
the cochlea in otherwise normal guinea pigs. The finding enhances the 
study of virus latency, a phenomenon of significance to a wide variety of 
ailments ranging from cold sores to cancer. 


Y ale’s growing stature in otolaryngology was under¬ 
scored last spring when two of the nation’s highest 
awards for research in this field were presented to mem¬ 
bers of the medical school faculty. 

The American Laryngological Association named Dr. 
John A. Kirchner, professor of otolaryngology, the 1969 
recipient of the Newcomb Award, given for the most 
outstanding contribution during the previous year to the 
literature on the larynx. A few days later, the Triological 
Society presented its Harris P. Mosher Award to Dr. 
David A. Hilding, associate professor of otolaryngology, 
in recognition of his research on the development of the 
inner ear. 

Dr. Kirchner is chief of the Section of Otolaryngology 
in the Department of Surgery. The research program of 
the section, he reports, comprises studies on the inner 
ear, the larynx, and the nasal airway. 


Otology 


Dr. Hilding and his group were the first to use the 
electron microscope to study defects of inner ear devel¬ 
opment. Its increased magnification and resolution as 
compared to the conventional light microscope have re¬ 
vealed previously unsuspected abnormalities of circu¬ 
lation and innervation in hereditarily deaf strains of 
animals. 

One of the difficult problems with which ear special¬ 
ists must deal is deafness due to defective development 
of the inner ear. Yet the inner ear is so inaccessible that 
knowledge about the structural defects that characterize 
human congenital deafness is limited. There are several 
strains of animals, however, whose hereditary deafness 
closely mimics that of humans, and Dr. Hilding and his 
group have examined the process of auditory degenera¬ 
tion in Shaker mice and Hedlund mink. 

In Shaker mice, they found that a bundle of nerve 
fibers fails to connect properly with receptor cells at a 
critical stage soon after birth. The receptor or hair cells 
within the coiled cochlea in the inner ear normally trans¬ 
form vibratory movements of the surrounding fluids into 
signals that are transmitted to the brain as nerve im¬ 
pulses. Proper innervation seems to be necessary for 
hair cells to develop normally. Another vital structure 
during development is a small special blood vessel that 
passes near the hair cells. Normally, it undergoes shrink¬ 
age during maturation. In Shaker mice it completely dis¬ 
appears at an early stage and this seems to contribute to 
the problem of hair cell degeneration. 

Hedlund mink are bred commercially for their beauti¬ 
ful, almost pure white pelts. Like Shaker mice, they are 


9 








invariably deaf, but the problem is quite different from 
that of the deaf strain of mice. A special tissue produces 
the fluid of the compartment of the cochlea that holds 
the hair cells. The circulation to this tissue becomes im¬ 
paired during development in Hedlund mink. This im¬ 
pairment is compounded by a relatively massive leak 
which regularly occurs through the partition between 
compartments at about the same stage. 

The research thesis for which Dr. Hilding received the 
Harris P. Mosher Award is entitled "Development of the 
Hearing Organ.” It is a detailed report of the events that 
occur as the inner ear develops in normal mammals and 
contains original electron microscopic observations on 
the origin of the fluid-producing tissue of the cochlea 
and on the relationship between nerve supply and matu¬ 
ration. 

The hair cells of the cochlea are situated quite far 
from their blood supply, a factor that apparently helps 
prevent acoustic interference. Vital substances must be 
transported to these receptor cells over a significant dis¬ 
tance, through several kinds of tissue. The distribution 
of enzymes concerned with metabolism and with trans¬ 
port has been studied in Dr. Hilding’s laboratory with 
histochemical methods adapted to electron microscopy 
and biochemical analysis. Dr. Yoshiaki Nakai, formerly 
a research associate in otolaryngology on leave from 
Osaka University, spent nearly three years working on 
this problem with Dr. Hilding and a concept of a com¬ 
plicated system for hair cell supply emerged from their 
work. 

In other research, a fourth-year medical student, 
Elliott Simon, has been using the micropuncture and 
microanalytical techniques developed for kidney study 
to investigate production of inner ear fluids. The hairs 
or receptor cells project into a special fluid called endo- 
lymph with an extraordinary electrolyte composition. It 
contains 20 times more potassium than sodium. Mr. 
Simon discovered that isolated tissue from the inner ear 
of frogs continues to produce endolymph at nearly 0° C. 
for several days. This has provided a convenient means 
for clarifying the process of endolymph production. 
With the electron microscope, he has shown changes in 
tissue structure corresponding to differences in fluid 
production rate. 

In man, the commonest tumor that causes deafness is 
a benign growth arising from the nerve that supplies the 
inner ear. For many years there has been dispute about 
the cell type from which it comes. This has resulted in 
considerable confusion about its proper designation and 
it is generally known by its misnomer, "acoustic neu¬ 
roma.” Specimens from a large number of these tumors 


have been collected. With electron microscopy, it has 
been possible to demonstrate that these tumors arise 
from the same kind of cell that forms the wrapping 
around nerve fibers, a finding that simplifies the problem 
of their nomenclature. 

Laryngology 

The laryngology research program, conducted by Dr. 
Kirchner, includes research on cancer of the larynx and 
studies of physiological mechanisms of the vocal cords. 

Dr. John A. Kirchner (left J and Dr. Yasushi Murakami investigate neuro¬ 
physiological mechanisms within the larynx of an experimental animal. 
Reflex effects are studied by dissecting the laryngeal nerves and record¬ 
ing electrical impulses in the afferent and efferent nerves. The effects 
of various types of trauma to the motor nerves are observed and changes 
recorded with a motion picture camera. 



10 












In laryngeal cancer research, serial sections of larynx 
specimens removed for cancer are mounted in celloidin 
and then cut at 20 microns thickness for gross and micro¬ 
scopic examination. This method allows the investigator 
to identify the extent and physical behavior of cancer 
within the larynx and the surrounding structures. It also 
checks the accuracy of preoperative diagnostic tests and 
shows the effectiveness of certain anatomical bound¬ 
aries in limiting the spread of cancer within the larynx. 
It reveals the tendency of certain cancers to invade the 
laryngeal framework so as to make partial resection for 
such tumors impractical. Dr. Kirchner recently reported 
a study of the invasion of cancer into the framework in 
one hundred specimens. 

Such histological studies also reveal the effects of 
radiation. Dr. Kirchner notes that the information gained 
through this project should improve the ability to pre¬ 
serve the function of the larynx in treating cancer, 
whether the treatment is radiotherapy, chemotherapy, 
or partial resection of the organ. 

The second project in laryngology concerns the neuro¬ 
physiological mechanisms within the larynx as they re¬ 
late to the various functions of phonation, deglutition, 
respiration, and circulation. Most of this experimental 
work is carried out in cats and dogs, and occasionally in 
rats. The various reflex effects are studied by dissecting 
out the laryngeal nerves into small filaments and record¬ 
ing electrical impulses in the afferent or efferent nerves. 
The effects of various types of trauma to the motor 
nerves of the larynx in the neck and in the region of the 
thyroid gland are observed electromyographically and 
by direct inspection of the vocal cords through the laryn¬ 
goscope. Records of these changes are made with mo¬ 
tion pictures. 

Collaborating with Dr. Kirchner in these studies are 
Dr. Masafumi Suzuki and Dr. Yasushi Murakami, both 
research associates in otolaryngology, who are on leave 
from Keio Medical School in Tokyo. Some of the prob¬ 
lems investigated by the laryngology group are as 
follows: 

Reflex cardiac effects Bradycardia and disturbances in 
cardiac rhythm are sometimes observed in patients dur¬ 
ing intubation or bronchoscopy under anesthesia. The 
group’s work in the experimental animal has identified 
a reflex pathway from the larynx which produces dis¬ 
turbances in cardiac rate and rhythm. Stretching the 
laryngeal lumen as with a tight endotracheal tube initi¬ 
ates this reflex. These findings have recently been pub¬ 
lished. 

Sensation A diamond-shaped area inside the cricothy¬ 
roid membrane below the vocal cords has been shown 


to be supplied by the external branch of the superior 
laryngeal nerve, a trunk ordinarily regarded as being 
purely motor. Similarly, afferent nerve fibers have been 
identified within the current laryngeal nerve, mostly 
from mucous membrane below the vocal cords. 
Feedback mechanisms The question of a self-regula¬ 
tory system from receptors within the vocal cords and 
laryngeal structures themselves in monitoring vocal per¬ 
formance has interested investigators for several years. 
Investigations at Yale are adding support to the concept 
that a self-regulating monitoring system exists within 

Dr. James M. Ozenberger’s research in nasal physiology and pathology 
includes evaluation of cryosurgery in the treatment of chronic rhinitis. 

He originated the procedure shown here in which he uses a liquid Freon 
cryoprobe for removal of diseased nasai tissue. 



11 




the muscles and joint capsules of the larynx and that 
these are independent of any monitoring effect on the 
voice furnished by the hearing mechanism. 

The role of the extrinsic laryngeal or strap muscles in 
respiration and phonation These muscles are appar¬ 
ently accessory tensors and relaxers of the vocal cords 
and influence the shape of the glottis along with the in¬ 
trinsic muscles of the larynx. Disorders of these muscles 
resulting from their injury or denervation at thyroidec¬ 
tomy are sometimes responsible for loss of vocal range, 
in spite of an intact motor nerve supply to the intrinsic 
laryngeal muscles. 

Laryngeal protective mechanisms These are being stud¬ 
ied in relation to partial laryngectomy and similar pro¬ 
cedures for cancer in certain parts of the larynx. 

Dr. Kirchner reports that electromyographic record¬ 
ings are occasionally made in the larynx of the patient 
with vocal cord paralysis as a means of determining the 
degree and extent of nerve involvement. 

Nasal Airway Studies 

Research related to nasal physiology and nasal pathol¬ 
ogy is being conducted by Dr. James M. Ozenberger, 
assistant professor of otolaryngology, and Dr. Jerold J. 
Principato, an instructor and chief resident in otolaryn¬ 
gology. Studies are primarily clinical in nature, and even 
the investigation of normal phenomena is expected to 
provide a better understanding of disease states. 

The normal “nasal cycle,” an alternating increase in 
the resistance in the two sides of the nose, is being 
studied, and effects of drugs, inhaled gases, body posi¬ 
tion, and other variables have been recorded. The role 
of the nasal cycle in normal body function has never 
been fully established. Although most individuals never 
notice this alternating obstruction of one side of the 
nose, patients with nasal disease may become aware 
of it. 

Nasal muscles are being studied both anatomically 
and functionally, the latter by electromyography. The 
activity of these muscles is more apparent in lower ani¬ 
mals but may be observed in humans with respiratory 
distress. Dysfunction of the muscles due to stretching 
or decreased stimulation may account for poor subjec¬ 
tive improvement in patients who have undergone nasal 
surgery. 

Nasal resistance, that of each side and of both sides 
simultaneously, is being determined in normal and dis¬ 
eased noses. Sensitive electronic equipment has been 
designed to measure the resistance with minimal intro¬ 
duction of testing variables. Results of measurements to 


date suggest that neither the patient nor his otolaryn¬ 
gologist can estimate objectively the degree of nasal 
obstruction. It is hoped that the resistance studies will t 
help to eliminate as surgical candidates those patients 
who would experience little or no improvement. 

Through measurements of nasal resistance, functional 
results of nasal surgery performed primarily for cos¬ 
metic reasons are being evaluated. The goal in such 
studies is improvement in, or at least preservation of, a 
patient’s nasal function along with improvement in the 
appearance of the nose. 

The relationship of nasal obstruction to disease in the 
lower respiratory tract is being investigated. Recently 
there has been increased interest in the relationship of 
the upper and lower airways. Nasal obstruction by ade¬ 
noids has been described as a cause for pulmonary dis- , 
ease and, subsequently, heart disease in children. It is 
probable that upper airway disease produces changes in 
pulmonary function in individuals of any age. There 
have been reports of improvement in impaired pulmo¬ 
nary function in patients with deviated nasal septums 
following surgical correction of the nasal obstruction. 

The use of cryosurgery in the treatment of chronic 
rhinitis, a very common nasal disorder, is being evalu¬ 
ated. Cryosurgery is not a new technique, but there is 
little information about its effectiveness in destroying 
diseased nasal tissue. A liquid Freon cryoprobe is cur¬ 
rently being used for removal of tissue in chronic rhin¬ 
itis. Although there is a very high rate of subjective 
improvement following this form of treatment, objective 
techniques of evaluation are being employed. These in¬ 
clude measurement of nasal resistance in the manner 
mentioned previously, biopsies to demonstrate the mi¬ 
croscopic changes in nasal tissue, and cytological exam¬ 
inations before and after treatment. 

Other studies are concerned with the comparison of 
cytological examination of nasal secretions with the 
findings from biopsies. If valid information can be ob¬ 
tained from a nasal smear, a most innocuous procedure, 
biopsies may become unnecessary. 

In view of the significant developments in these three 
areas of study, it is understandable that the Section of 
Otolaryngology at Yale is being watched with consider¬ 
able interest by specialists in this field throughout the 
country. 


12 






Capital Fund Campaign 



O ne-third of Yale’s medical alumni have pledged the 
first one million dollars to the Alumni in Medicine 
campaign fund. 

Leona Baumgartner, M.D., general chairman, an¬ 
nounced in October that a total of $1,000,000 had been 
pledged to the School of Medicine for the improvement 
of teaching facilities and various special programs. Dr. 
Baumgartner viewed the progress to date and the gift 
average of $1,300 as "an important reflection of really 
broad and generous support, and a significant awareness 
by these donors of what the Yale educational experience 
has meant to them during their careers as physicians." 
The gift total does not include any large foundation or 
individual gifts to the school in amounts over $50,000. 

“My greatest concern now is to reach those who have 
been asked, but have not yet responded,” added Dr. 
Baumgartner. “The Campaign Cabinet and I are urging 
these alumni, numbering more than a thousand, to re¬ 
cord their intentions and help us raise an additional 
$600,000 in pledges by December 31, 1969 — as a crucial 
demonstration of their faith in the Yale School of Medi¬ 
cine. The successful conclusion of the campaign depends 
on the response of those who have not yet determined 
what their own meaningful participation will be.” 

The Office of University Development reports that en¬ 
couraging conversations with several individual pros¬ 
pects are under way. These potential pledges should 
amount to an additional one million dollars, and will 
serve to outline dramatically both professional and 
alumni faith in the potential of Yale’s medical school for 
providing excellent medical education and models of 
health delivery. 

In her effort to generate wider participation, particu¬ 
larly among those doctors who have not yet committed 
themselves in any way to the campaign in support of the 
School of Medicine, Dr. Baumgartner said the following: 
“It is usually embarrassing to ask for money, but in 
this instance, I am not at all embarrassed. The least 
that any of us can do is to repay our honest debts to 


Yale. I was stunned when I realized how much my 
training had cost the institution. I had to borrow 
money to go through medical school, and I felt very 
noble when 1 paid back the sum I had borrowed. But 
when I recalculated the cost of my education, I be¬ 
came aware how far short the repayment of my debt 
was. I resolved to wipe out my real indebtedness and 
made a large additional payment so I could feel honest 
about my relation to the school. Quite bluntly, I think 
those of us without large families can plan in some 
way, via wills, delayed payments, gifts of property or 
stocks, to do something to help. There is no question 
but that the school needs it desperately now. It is quite 
an exciting place.” 

Many of those who have given have preferred to make 
special designations of their gifts. Pledges may be di¬ 
rected over a period of time toward: a) support of cer¬ 
tain specialties, such as an endowed lectureship at 
$25,000; b) scholarships, fellowships, or student loans, 
such as an endowed scholarship at $50,000, or an en¬ 
dowed fellowship at $75,000; c) the Grover F. Powers 
Professorship Fund; or d) a portion of the new medical 
sciences teaching center. 

Some doctors have been able to influence grateful and 
affluent patients to make generous contributions. Dr. 
Baumgartner has been particularly concerned about con¬ 
tributions to the Powers Professorship Fund. She has 
been deeply disappointed by the response: 

“We are having a rough time getting a start on the 
Grover Powers Professorship. Gifts are so small. So 
many owe their careers and earning ability to him . . . 
I fear that people do not remember that they paid only 
about one-fourth of what it cost to educate them each 
medical school year, and many overlook the value of 
their residency years.” 

Alumni attention is directed to the opportunity for 
making a pledge commitment through any one of a num¬ 
ber of deferred giving arrangements: a) irrevocable 
trusts, with reservation of life income; b) bequests; c) 
endowment anticipation grants; and d) bequest antici¬ 
pation grants. Gifts of appreciated securities, or the 
donative sale of securities, also bear thoughtful consid¬ 
eration. 

“Yale is having a tough time financially — so I do hope 
you can do more in the future. None of us could have 
done what we have without this school.” 

Dr. Baumgartner’s own testamentary plans include, in 
addition to her outright and generous three-year pledge, 
establishment of a trust with reservation of life income, 
the principal of which will ultimately go to the Medical 
School. 


13 






Anatomist and Medical Historian 

O n relinquishing his responsibilities as associate 
dean in charge of student affairs and admissions, 
Tom Forbes did not return to research and teaching — 
he had never left. Dr. Forbes can be justifiably proud of 
the fact that, in spite of the time-consuming meetings, 
interviews, and correspondence required by his ad¬ 
ministrative post, he managed to carry a full teaching 
schedule and to continue his research in reproductive 
endocrinology and medical history. He even sand¬ 
wiched in the publication of a book representing the 
latter area of interest and is now well into a second 
one. The published volume, The Midwife and the 
Witch , is a colorful and carefully documented examina¬ 
tion of some of the once prevalent superstitions sur¬ 
rounding delivery and birth and some scientific explan¬ 
ations for them. 

The second volume will be a study of a small parish 
in London just outside the city wall — St. Butolph's 
without Aldgate — which lays claim to no great names, 
no important buildings, and was the scene of no cele¬ 
brated event. What sets St. Butolph’s apart, according 
to Dr. Forbes, is the completeness of its vital statistics 
over the period from 1558 to 1625, a span which exactly 
coincides with the reigns of Elizabeth I and James I. 

During that period such full daily records were kept 
by a succession of conscientious parish clerks that it is 
possible to recreate with accuracy many aspects of 
daily life in this small cosmos -— the occupations of the 
population and some of the occupational hazards, the 
rate of stillbirths and neonatal mortality, the impact of 
four plague epidemics. When a death occurred in the 
parish, notations were made about the age of the de¬ 
ceased, his address, his occupation, the presumed cause 
of death, the date of the burial, and the charges — so 
much for digging the grave, so much for the black 
cloth, and so much for ringing the knell. 

To track down information on these and similar re¬ 
search projects which have furnished material for sev¬ 
eral monographs of both medical and historical interest, 
the Forbes family has spent parts of a dozen summers 
and a sabbatical year in England. Dr. Forbes is a fa¬ 
miliar figure at the Royal Society of Medicine Library, 
the British Museum Library, and the Wellcome Histori¬ 
cal Library in London. Helen Forbes, his wife, has mas¬ 
tered brilliantly the art of housekeeping on two conti¬ 
nents. Her outside interests, whether at home or 
abroad, center on matters musical and horticultural. 
When in London, the Forbes have stayed in Hampstead 
and, while Tom does research, Helen travels to horti¬ 
cultural shows and border gardens, seeking ideas she 
can adapt to her own neat garden in Connecticut, 


Faculty Profile: Thomas R. Forbes, Ph.D., 
Professor of Anatomy 



where she is a member of the Garden Club of New 
Haven. At home, she also belongs to the Fortnightly 
and North End Clubs. 

A European trip which Dr. Forbes recalls with par¬ 
ticular pleasure occurred in the summer of 1950, when 
he and a handful of American professors were invited 
to visit several German medical schools under the aus¬ 
pices of the Unitarian Services Committee. Their pur¬ 
pose: to assist in bringing curricula in the clinical and 
preclinical sciences up to date. Their itinerary included 
a month in Marburg and a week in four other German 
cities — Frankfurt, Tubingen, Berlin, and Hamburg. 

| 

Early Years in Oak Park 

Thomas R. Forbes was born in New York City in 
1911 and moved to Oak Park, a suburb of Chicago, with 
his parents while still a baby. The elder Forbes, now 
retired, was in the toy business and made Lincoln Logs. 
These sets of interlocking logs for making tiny cabins 
and other constructions were invented by John Lloyd 
Wright, son of the architect Frank Lloyd Wright. 

As a boy in Oak Park, Tom Forbes considered being 
a chemist, a librarian, or a writer (Ernest Hemingway 



\ 

4 


14 






lived just a block away and, like the children in the 
Forbes household, attended Oak Park High School). 
Unlike many young boys with vocational aspirations, 
Dr. Forbes, professor of anatomy, medical historian, 
and author of more than 125 papers, chapters, and 
abstracts and two books, has come close to living his 
dreams. 

Partly because he was younger than most graduates 
on leaving high school and partly because he needed 
the money for college, Dr. Forbes worked for a year as 
a factory hand in the Western Electric Company in 
Chicago before going on with his studies. A fringe 

benefit of the job was increased motivation to attain 

j 

a higher level of education. 

In 1929 he entered the University of Rochester, from 
which had graduated his grandfather and his father, 
and where he was followed by two brothers, two or 
three cousins, and one of his own two sons. In his 
senior year he became interested in an endocrine re¬ 
search project in the Anatomy Department, using alli¬ 
gators as subjects. The research was initiated because 
there had been little study of reproduction in reptiles. 
Alligators were selected because they were plentiful 
and, for a time at least, of a convenient size to keep in 
the laboratory. In 1933 he was graduated with a B.A. 
degree cum laude in biology and the firm conviction 
that he would like to remain at Rochester for an ad¬ 
vanced degree in anatomy. The University administra¬ 
tion seemed to feel the same way about it for they 
offered him a four-year fellowship in the School of 
Medicine and Dentistry. 

The medical school at Rochester was relatively new, 
having opened in 1925, but it had a remarkable senior 
faculty, most of whom had come from Johns Hopkins. 
The Anatomy Department included Dr. George Wash¬ 
ington Corner, chairman of the department, who was 
then doing the research that culminated in the discov¬ 
ery, with Dr. Willard Allen, of progesterone, and Dr. 
Robert Burns, then an associate professor and the fac¬ 
ulty member directing Tom Forbes’ work. 

“I was engaged in studying the action of pituitary 
gonadotrophic hormones and of a crude form of female 
sex hormone, available at the time, on the reproductive 
tract. It had a very powerful effect, and gave me a lot 
of good material for a thesis. Then I became interested 
in the use of pellets of pure crystalline sex hormones. 
In the ’40s it was not unusual to give pellets of sex 
hormones to patients, particularly to women patients 
who might require treatment over a long period of time. 
This was much simpler than repeated injections and 
office appointments. In addition the material injected 


was absorbed into the bloodstream and metabolized 
so rapidly that sustained blood levels could not be 
achieved. I was particularly interested in the pellets 
which were merely placed under the skin; the best way 
to make them; their absorption rates; and why certain 
hormones were absorbed more rapidly than others. 
These pellets were used quite extensively until the 
early ’50s when synthetic sex hormones which could 
be taken by mouth came on the market.” 

Dr. Forbes received his Ph.D. degree in anatomy in 

1937 and that fall joined the faculty of the Johns Hop¬ 
kins School of Medicine as an assistant in anatomy. 
Here too he worked with a distinguished chief who was 
an influential force in the emerging career of Tom 
Forbes. Dr. Lewis Weed, then chairman of the Anatomy 
Department and Director of the medical school, was 
later chairman of the Division of Medical Sciences of 
the National Research Council during World War II. By 

1938 Dr. Forbes had been promoted to instructor in 
anatomy, a position he held — with interruptions — 
until 1945. Meanwhile, a keen desire to devote his time 
to research in reproductive endocrinology and to get 
additional experience and training moved him to apply 
for a Guggenheim fellowship to study in the Anatomy 
Department at Yale, known to have one of the out¬ 
standing teams of reproductive endocrinologists in the 
country. 

With the onset of the war, Dr. Weed pressed Dr. 
Forbes to join him at the National Research Council, 
at first on a part-time basis. One weekend in March 
of 1942 is etched on Dr. Forbes’ memory. On Friday his 
younger son was born, and the following morning the 
excited father received a letter awarding him the cov¬ 
eted fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation. 
When he returned to Washington the following Mon¬ 
day, he was asked to undertake a double assignment, 
working for the Division of Medical Sciences and for 
the Committee on Medical Research of the Office of 
Scientific Research and Development. When the Gug¬ 
genheim committee agreed to postpone tenure of the 
fellowship for the duration, Dr. Forbes accepted the 
government assignments. 

His Washington posts put him in charge of a growing 
file of information on government-sponsored civilian 
research related to military medicine. It was largely clas¬ 
sified material and Dr. Forbes’ job was to see that the 
documents were obtained, indexed, and made available 
to people with security clearance throughout the coun¬ 
try. He compiled material, for example, on the treatment 
of burns and the use of pressure suits; he gathered data 
on problems of dehydration and insect control, tropi- 


15 




cal disease and aviation medicine — a whole catalogue 
of problems which concern a country at war. 

“It was a most interesting job because of the topflight 
people who were called in as consultants, but it was 
terrible commuting. At that time I was living on the 
edge of town in Baltimore with my wife and two small 
sons and, door-to-door, it was a two-hour ride each 
way. The railroad cars were freezing in winter and 
blistering in summer but an extremely fine group of 
people commuted daily, including Dr. Weed, Dr. E. 
Cowles Andrus, Dr. Louis Flexner, Dr. Sanford Larkey, 
and Dr. Perrin Long, who had much to do with the 
trials of the sulfa drugs, first tested on a major scale at 
Pearl Harbor. There was also a large contingent that 
came down often from Yale — John Fulton, Hugh Long, 
Milton Winternitz, Levin Waters, George Smith, Francis 
Blake, Sam Harvey, and others.” 

It is ironic that Dr. Forbes left the Washington post 
to come to Yale because he felt he had had enough of 
administration. As the war was drawing to a close, Dr. 
George Smith, who had headed the Subcommittee on 
Armored Vehicles at the National Research Council 
and who was a member of Yale’s Department of Anat¬ 
omy, informed Dr. Forbes of an opening in the depart¬ 
ment as an instructor. Here was the opportunity for re¬ 
search that the Guggenheim fellowship was to have 
provided. 

“Bill Gardner had become chairman of the depart¬ 
ment. Others interested in endocrinology were Carroll 
Pfeiffer, Tom Dougherty, and Charlie Hooker. Dr. 
Hooker had recently proposed a new bio-assay for the 
hormone, progesterone, using mice as subjects.” 

In the bio-assay that Drs. Hooker and Forbes even¬ 
tually developed, the mice were ovariectomized and the 
material to be measured was injected into the cavity 
of a segment of the uterus. The hormone acted on the 
immediately adjacent connective tissue, thus avoiding 
any diluting effect. The minimal effective dose of pro¬ 
gesterone in the Hooker-Forbes bio-assay, using the 
CHI mouse [a highly pedigreed inbred strain] is 0.0002 
microgram. For a concrete conception of this figure, Dr. 
Forbes supplied the following equivalent: An ordinary 
six-cent Roosevelt postage stamp, uncancelled, weighs 
about 65 milligrams or 65,000 micrograms. The minimal 
effective dose of progesterone is equal to 1/325,000,000 
of the weight of the postage stamp. 

What began as a departmental association culmi¬ 
nated in a happy collaboration and in the discovery of 
this highly useful biological measurement, known 
throughout the world and employed in measuring the 
activity of progesterone and related compounds, and in 


Dr. Forbes lectured at the 
Anatomisches Institut in 
Marburg in 1950. In Ger¬ 
many he spoke in German 
in France in French. 



following the changes in activity level in the body. 
Progesterone is a key hormone in the menstrual cycle, 
in pregnancy, and in the compounding of birth control 
pills. 

Decanal Considerations 

In 1946 Dr. Forbes was named assistant professor of 
anatomy, in 1951, associate professor and in 1962 he 
was promoted to professor. He was again faced with 
the problems of administration when, in 1948, he was 
offered the post of assistant dean of the School of 
Medicine and chairman of its Committee on Student 
Affairs which handled admissions. He accepted, and in 
1960, became associate dean. 

Student selection, always challenging, has become 
increasingly difficult in the last few years, according to 
the man who played an important role in the selection 
of the men and women who will make up the class of 
1973. For not only has the number of applications in¬ 
creased: the quality of the students has risen. Of the 
1,550 applications received last year, Dr. Forbes esti¬ 
mates that at least 300-400 were highly qualified. “The 
problem,” he stated, “is how to assess what kind of 
doctors they would make ten or twenty years from 
now. It is easy to spot intelligent people with good 
academic records. But how can one assess potential 
skill as a physician, character and personality as a 
practitioner? It's paradoxical that we live in a world of 
laboratories and computers but have to select medical 
students by trying to read the future. Although they 
have widely varied interests, our students are fairly 
homogeneous in academic ability. We have little trouble 


16 







with poor students: the academic failure rate over 
twenty years has been less than 1 per cent.” 

Moving from a discussion of the general student 
body to its component parts, Dr. Forbes turned to the 
question of women applicants. “There’s no doubt that 
girls make good medical students and good doctors,” 
he said. “But experience from the national surveys 
shows that their professional mortality is considerably 
higher than that of the men. If only we could pick 
ahead of time those girls who will finish and practice. 
We think of outstanding women graduates of this 
medical school like Leona Baumgartner and Elizabeth 
Ramsey. It would have been a pity if they had not 
been admitted. We end up with a compromise position 
and something like ten per cent of the class being 
! women, a figure, incidentally, closely resembling the 
national percentage of women applicants.” 

Another component under the general heading of ad¬ 
missions has been the recruitment of black students. 
“We have ten in this year's first year class — eight 
Americans and two Africans, nine men and one wo¬ 
man.” To assist premedical students who may not have 



| 


strong preparation in prerequisites at the medical 
school, Yale College, in cooperation with Harvard and 
Columbia, has instituted the Intensive Summer Study 
Program. 

In addition to pursuing his administrative duties, his 
writing, and his laboratory research, Dr. Forbes is a 
formidable contender as a teacher. He teaches a 
course in gross anatomy, an elective in endocrinology 
and another in the history of anatomy and medical 
terminology. His own interest in medical history dates 
back to his joining the Yale faculty. It was generated 
through the influence of the late Dr. John Fulton and 
has been sustained by the wealth of materials in the 
medical school’s historical library. 

At Home in Hamden 

It was a fitting move when the Forbes family came to 
New Haven for Dr. Forbes is a direct descendant of 
Theophilus Eaton, the first governor of Connecticut, 
who is buried in the Grove Street Cemetery. And it was 
a fortunate thing for annual processions of students 

Left: The anatomist at work with his laboratory assistant, Jane Cherry. 

Dr. Forbes is tying off the uterine segment of a mouse infected with 
progesterone. 


Beiow: Duke Ellington on the Yale campus to receive an honorary degree 
in music at the graduation of 1967, exchanged notes with Dean Forbes as 
the commencement procession dispersed. 



17 







that the anatomist was accompanied by Helen Forbes, 
who will be remembered by scores of graduates for 
her southern hospitality. 

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, Mrs. Forbes attended 
Vanderbilt University and was graduated from Baylor 
University. Having both the talent and the desire to 
become a professional pianist, she won a scholarship 
to the Eastman School of Music of the University of 
Rochester where she earned a master’s degree in music 
education. While at the University, she met and mar¬ 
ried Tom Forbes who was then in his first year of 
graduate school. 

The other Thomas R. Forbes listed in the Yale Direc¬ 
tory is Dr. Forbes’ son who is in charge of bursary stu¬ 
dents in Yale College and an assistant director of finan¬ 
cial aids. A second son, William, is married and lives in 
Williamsburg, Massachusetts. A registered x-ray tech¬ 
nician, he is a technical marketing and service repre¬ 
sentative of a Boston firm. 

When the Forbes family first came to New Haven, no 
adequate housing arrangements for medical students 
existed. Until Edward S. Harkness Hall was built in 
1954-55 (as assistant dean of students, Dr. Forbes 
played an important role in the planning of this build¬ 
ing), students customarily lived in one of three dingy 
apartment buildings on Howard Avenue and had little 


opportunity for social contact with one another or with 
the faculty. Daily teas, instituted under Dean Winter- 
nitz, were held in the Sterling Lounge, now the faculty 
lunchroom. Besides inviting students to her home in 
Hamden, Mrs. Forbes gave a great deal of time to 
assisting at the teas which were attended in figures 
astronomical by students, faculty, nurses, technicians, 
and other staff. Each day at 4:00 hundreds of dainty 
sandwiches and cookies were washed down with hun¬ 
dreds of cups of very strong tea, some students de¬ 
pending on the afternoon collation to substitute for 
their evening meal. Funds for the teas were raised by 
the annual Aesculapian Frolic held in the medical 
school gymnasium, the area above Sterling Lounge 
which now houses part of the Department of Pharma¬ 
cology. A former-student-now-colleague of Dr. Forbes’ 
worked his way through the graduate school at least in 
part by providing his band for the dance and playing 
the trumpet in the combo. The young man with the horn 
is today Dr. Edmund S. Crelin, professor of anatomy. 

It is clear that New Haven, and the medical school 
faculty and students have meant much in the lives of 
the Forbes family; the converse is also the case. 

Family gathering on the back porch: Tom and Helen Forbes with son 
Bill and his wife Betsy, Tom, Jr., and the family husky, Knikki. 



18 












The First-Year Class 


T hese are the 82 men and 7 women who constitute 
the Yale medical class of 1973. They come from 21 
states, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the 
Republic of Kenya. One holds an M.S. degree and two 


Paul Gordon Abrams (B.A. Yale University 1969), Creat Neck, New York 
David Avram Adler (B.A. University of Rochester 1969), Briarcliff Manor, 
New York 

Peter Baily Anderson (B.A. Dartmouth College 1969), Lynnfield, Massa¬ 
chusetts 

John Crest Anes (B.S. Union College 1969), Adams, Massachusetts 
David Alan Baggish (B.A. Adelphi University 1969), West Hartford, Con¬ 
necticut 

David Nelson Bailey (B.S. Indiana University 1967), Fortville, Indiana 
Bennett Lloyd Blitzer (B.A. Colgate University 1969), Plainview, New York 
Clement Richard Boland (B.A. University of Notre Dame 1969), En dwell, 
New York 

Richard Philip Bozof (B.A. Dartmouth College 1969), Silver Spring, Mary¬ 
land 

Michael Laird Bramley (B.S. Washington & Lee University 1969), Alexan¬ 
dria, Virginia 

John Ollis Brown, Jr. (B.A. Harvard University 1968), Miami, Florida 
Robert William Bucholz (B.A. Yale University 1969), Omaha, Nebraska 
James Norman Campbell (B.A. University of Michigan 1969), Royal Oak, 
Michigan 

Marvin Micah Chassin (B.A. Colgate University 1969), Kenmore, New York 
William Thomas Choctaw (B.S. Tennessee A & I University 1969), Nash¬ 
ville, Tennessee 

Francis Sessions Cole, III (B.A. Amherst College 1969), Providence, Rhode 
Island 

George Bernard Colson (B.A. Northeastern University 1968), Neptune, 
New Jersey 

Joseph Michael Connors (B.S. Trinity College 1969), North Eastham, Mas¬ 
sachusetts 

David Louis Coulter (B.S. University of Notre Dame 1969), Dearborn, 
Michigan 

Paul David (B.A. Brandeis University 1969), Roslyn Heights, New York 
Carolyn Gissen Dedrick (B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1969), 
Tenafly, New Jersey 

Robert John DeLorenzo (B.S. Yale University 1969), Trenton, New Jersey 
Christopher Miller Doran (B.A. Cornell University 1969), Albany, New 
York 

Joseph Walter Eichenbaum (B.A. Yeshiva College 1969), Oceanside, New 
York 

Richard Jay Fingeroth (B.A. Tufts University 1969), Scarsdale, New York 
Glenn Sherman Forbes (B.S. University of Notre Dame 1969), Glenview, 
Illinois 

George Ivor Frank (B.A. Cornell University 1969), Wilton, New York 
Reginald Keith Franklin (B.S. Howard University 1969), Washington, D C. 
Robert Edward Galloway (B.S. Loyola University 1965), Chicago, Illinois 
Lee Goldman (B.A. Yale University 1969), Collingswood, New Jersey 
Gary Victor Gordon (B.A. Brown University 1969) Worchester, Massachu¬ 
setts 

Gary Thomas Grimes (B.S. Howard University 1968), Hyattsville, Mary¬ 
land 

Neal Handel (B.A. Columbia University 1969), Van Nuys, California 
Jorge Luis Hernandez (B.A. Boston University 1969), Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Howard Steven Honig (B.A. University of Rochester 1969), Garden City, 
New York 

Wanda Devora Huff (B.A. Cornell University 1969), Detroit, Michigan 
Robert Charles Jimerson (B.A. Yale University 1969), Sinking Spring, 
Pennsylvania 

David Charles Johnson (B.S. Yale University 1969), Wilmington, Delaware 
Andrew Gabor Kadar (B.S. University of California at Los Angeles 1969), 
Los Angeles, California 

John Munn Kirkwood (B.A. Oberlin College 1969), Rowayton, Connecticut 
Michael Stuart Kramer (B.A. University of Chicago 1969), Miami, Florida 
Christine Ann Kull (B.S. Fordham University 1969), Brooklyn, New York 
George Lister, Jr. (B.A. Brown University 1969), Miami, Florida 
Harold Raymond Mancusi-Ungaro, Jr. (B.A. Yale University 1969), Upper 
Montclair, New Jersey 

Douglas Ernest Mattox (B.S. Dartmouth College 1969), Terre Haute, In¬ 
diana 

William McBride (B.A. Lincoln University 1969), Brooklyn, New York 
Mark Gerald Fielding McCormick (B.A. Yale University 1969), East 
Aurora, New York 

John Anders McDowell (B.A. Amherst College 1969), West Chester, Penn¬ 
sylvania 


have earned the Ph. D. degree. Eight members of the 
class are registered as candidates for the combined 
M.D./Ph. D. degree. 


John Francis McQuade, III (B.S. Yale University 1969), Towson, Maryland 
Marvin Elliott Miller (B.S. Trinity College 1969), Philadelphia, Pennsyl¬ 
vania 

Mika Omieri Mitoko (B.S. Brooklyn College of Pharmacy 1969), Karachu- 
onyo, Kenya 

Daniel Aaron Moros (B.A. Columbia University 1969), Long Island City, 
New York 

Jerry Nagler (B.A. Columbia University 1969), Rego Park, New York 
John Frederick Neil (B.A. Yale University 1969), Springfield, Illinois 
James Anthony Neviackas (B.A. Boston University 1969), Greenlawn, New 
York 

Claes Mats Nilsson (B.A. Yale University 1969), Shrewsbury, Massachu¬ 
setts 

Lynne Miriam Oakland (B.A. Swarthmore College 1969), Montgomery, 
New York 

Howard Ozer, Jr. (B.S. Yale University 1969), Fairfax, Virginia 
Victor Lemuel Pappoe (B.A. Yale University 1969), Mystic, Connecticut 
David Edward Peach (B.A. Yale University 1969), West Redding, Connec¬ 
ticut 

David Pickar (B.A. Rutgers University 1969), North Brunswick, New 
Jersey 

Robert Joseph Polackwich (B.A. Yale University 1969), Saco, Maine 
John William Popp, Jr. (B.A. Vanderbilt University 1969), Elmhurst, Illi¬ 
nois 

Helene Linda Posner (B.A. Brooklyn College 1969), Brooklyn, New York 
Robert Hugh Posteraro (B.S. Fordham College 1969), Larchmont, New 
York 

Charles Felder Reynolds, III (B.A. University of Virginia 1969), Richmond, 
Virginia 

James Stephen Robertson (B.S. Trinity College 1969), Iron Mountain, 
Michigan 

Thomas James Romano (B.S. University of Notre Dame 1969), Valley 
Stream, New York 

Harry Solomon Romanowitz (B.A. Brooklyn College 1969), Brooklyn, New 
York 

Jerrold Frank Rosenbaum (B.A. Yale University 1969), West Hartford, 
Connecticut 

John Keller Rugge, Jr. (B.A. Williams College 1966, Harvard Divinity 
School 1966-1969), Somerville, Massachusetts 
Donald Allen Schon (B.S. University of Michigan 1969), Huntington 
Woods, Michigan 

John Paul Sherck (B.A. Miami University, Ohio, 1969), Rock Hill, Missouri 
George Daniel Shoup (B.S. Spring Hill College 1962, Ph.D. University of 
Colorado Medical Center 1966), Woodstock, Maryland 
Joseph Frank Simeone (B.A. Dartmouth College 1967, M.S. Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 1969), Rochester, New York 
Robert Alan Sirota (B.S. Long Island University 1969), Massapequa, New 
York 

Michael Edward Solin (B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1969), 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Carole Ann Stashwick (B.A. Albertus Magnus College 1966), Killingworth, 
Connecticut 

John Russell Stratton (B.A. Case Western Reserve University 1968), Salem, 
Ohio 

Charles Frederick Stroebel, III (B.A. University of Minnesota 1958, Ph.D. 

University of Minnesota 1961), Wethersfield, Connecticut 
James Francis Sullivan (B.S. Manhattan College 1969), Brooklyn, New 
York 

Thomas Francis Sweeney (B.A. Holy Cross College 1969), New Haven, 
Connecticut 

Marjorie Ellen Tripp (B.A. Stanford University 1968), Moraga, California 
Robert Joseph Ursano (B.S. University of Notre Dame 1969), Alexandria, 
Virginia 

Bruce Thomas Volpe (B.A. Yale University 1969), Yonkers, New York 
Marc Alan Weinberg (B.A. Hofstra University 1969), Dix Hills, New York 
Christopher Stanton Werner (B.A. Dickinson College 1969), Washington, 
D.C. 

Richard Sai Kin Young (B.A. Stanford University 1969), Honolulu, Hawaii 
Randall Mark Zusman (B.S. University of Michigan 1969), Southfield, 
Michigan 


19 







New York Cocktail Party 


An enjoyable sidelight of the eventful American Medi¬ 
cal Association annual convention in July was a cocktail 
party at the Yale Club of New York City where more 
than one hundred alumni in medicine and their guests 
gathered to renew friendships. 




Above: Representing the earliest class in attendance at the party 
were Dr. and Mrs. Joseph E. J. Harris of Albuquerque, New 
Mexico. Dr. Harris is a member of the medical class of 1912. 


Left: Nutmeggers abroad: Dr. William Wawro, ’38, of Hartford, 
and his daughter Jill (left) with Dr. E. Erwin Tracy, ’29, and Mrs. 
Tracy of Middletown, Connecticut. 




Below: Dr. Nicholas Spinelli and Dr. Lawrence Pickett, both '44, | 

converse with two ’45ers, Dr. Richard W. Breck and Dr. James D. 
Gardam. 



20 
























Above: Dr. Robert E. Kaufman, '33, and Mrs. Kaufman with Dr. 
William A. Pettinger, '64hs, and Mrs. Pettinger. 


Above: Twenty-year reunion: Dr. Daniel W. Elliott of Pittsburgh and Dr. 
George R. Anderson of San Antonio had not seen each other since they 
received their M.D. degrees together at Yaie in 1949. 


Below: Dr. Frank ]. Grady, '65, and Nichole Sweeder with Dr. Frank C. 
Bell, ’66, and Antoinette Verner. 



21 

















A Report from the Dean 



T he following comments regarding highlights of the 
academic year 1968-1969 were condensed from 
Dean Redlich's report at the year-end faculty meeting 
in June. 

Our tenured faculty has increased by 33 members 
since July 1, 1968, to a present total of 119 professors 
and associate professors. These figures represent the 
addition of 39 new members and the loss of six, the 
latter including two deaths: Dr. Nicholas Giarman and 
Dr. Harry Greene; two retirements: Dr. Donald Barron 
and Dr. Hugh Long; and two resignations: Dr. Carl von 
Essen, who has joined the faculty of the University of 
California at San Diego, and Dr. Roger McDonald, who 
will be going to the National Institute of Mental Health. 
The total faculty now numbers 1,213 members, of whom 
634 are full-time and 579 are part-time. 

A great gain was the strengthening and consolidation 
of the basic science departments, with the appoint¬ 
ments of four outstanding chairmen: Dr. Russell Barr- 


nett in Anatomy, Dr. Gerhard Giebisch in Physiology, 
Dr. Murdoch Ritchie in Pharmacology, and, most re¬ 
cently, Dr. Frederic Richards in the new university¬ 
wide Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochem¬ 
istry which will link the medical school more closely 
with science on the north campus. Together, these de¬ 
partments give us a very solid scientific base. 

The setting up of a new unit of behavioral sciences 
under Dr. Kenneth Keniston is an important step and 
should contribute substantially to research and teach¬ 
ing in these areas. The new section of clinical genetics 
attached to both Medicine and Pediatrics and headed 
by Dr. Leon Rosenberg is another major advance. 

A number of areas have been effectively strength¬ 
ened through new appointments: Dr. Graeme Hammond 
in cardiothoracic surgery, Dr. Thomas Krizek in plastic 
surgery, Dr. Solomon Schwartz in diagnostic radiology, 
and Dr. Robert Hutter in anatomical pathology. The 
development of a section of medical computer sciences 
under the direction of Dr. Shannon Brunjes is an espe¬ 
cially exciting move. 

Two changes have taken place in the chairmanships 
of clinical departments. In Psychiatry, Dr. Theodore 
Lidz decided to return to his research activities under 
the Research Career Award he holds from the National 
Institute of Mental Health, and we have been fortunate 
to attract Dr. Morton Reiser to succeed him. In Epi¬ 
demiology and Public Health, Dr. Robert McCollum has 
taken over the chairmanship from Dr. Adrian Ostfeld 
who will resume research in the field in which he is 
outstanding, chronic disease epidemiology. 

Financially, we have a great many problems but on 
the whole we are in relatively good shape. We have 
lost about $1 million (out of some $15 million) this year 
in federal support, most of it from research grants but 
some of it from training grants, which is more serious. 
One major new federal grant, however, made through 
the State of Connecticut, was the $2.5 million for work 
in drug dependency by our faculty in the Connecticut 
Mental Health Center. Although the government’s build¬ 
ing program is at a virtual standstill, we have received 
$1.4 million for the proposed Laboratory of Surgery, 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Confidence in our programs and plans is also repre¬ 
sented in some $3 million received from private sources. 
This includes grants from the John A. Hartford Founda¬ 
tion, for research in clinical genetics and the etiology 
of glaucoma; the Ford Foundation, for investigations by 
the Child Study Center of educational programs in the 
inner city; the Carnegie Foundation, for studies in the 
behavioral sciences; and the Kresge Foundation, which 


22 









has given a major grant toward the building of the 
Laboratory for Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

An important trend this year has been the increased 
emphasis on good clinical practice. I feel that our clini¬ 
cal faculty has made a greater effort than ever before 
to provide good care. It is a little early to evaluate the 
effect of the incentive system on the volume of practice 
by full-time faculty members, but it seems to be pro¬ 
viding increased motivation. 

Much of our attention has centered on the large 
community programs with which we are now involved: 
the University Health Plan, the Community Health Care 
Center Plan, and the Hill Health Center. As a school, 
we need these facilities in order to study the best ways 
of providing health services; we also need them in 
order to train physicians. And we intend to provide 
the best services we possibly can with the funds 
granted to us for these enterprises. In this connection, 
both the Connecticut Mental Health Center and the 
Yale Child Study Center are engaged in several projects 
where important scientific efforts are combined with 
the provision of first-rate services to the community. 

Guidelines for a modest international program with 
particular involvement in the Caribbean area, Colombia, 
and East Africa have been approved by the Board of 
Permanent Officers. 

We are also actively involved in the Regional Medi¬ 
cal Program which was funded this year with its first 
operating grant of $1.3 million. I have confidence that 
Dr. Henry Clark, working with the two participating 
medical schools, Yale and the University of Connecti¬ 
cut, will be able to implement this program in a mean¬ 
ingful way. 

There has been a trend this year toward greater em¬ 
phasis on good teaching, partly reflected in the new 
ranks we have created to recognize exceptional teacher- 
clinicians. This year we have carefully considered the 
opinions of students in evaluating the teaching abilities 
of faculty members up for promotion. We have been 
behind the rest of the university in this regard, and it 
is time we caught up. The role of student opinion in 
the evaluation of teaching will have to be further ex¬ 
panded and will undoubtedly have much impact on the 
system. 

We have had a sound, relatively open relationship 
between faculty and students this year, and we owe a 
great deal to those who carry responsibility in this sec¬ 
tor, especially to Dr. Thomas Forbes who is relinquish¬ 
ing his post as associate dean of student affairs. For 
many years he has been the faculty member who helped 
and guided students in every respect and maintained 


close relationships with them. He is going back to hi.s 
research and teaching in the Department of Anatomy, 
to be succeeded by Dr. Howard Levitin, who will be 
aided by a new associate dean, Dr. James Comer. 

There is no question that students are changing in 
their attitudes and values. We must be sensitive to 
these changes and keep in close touch with student 
points of view. To determine just what we as faculty 
should provide and what students should avail them¬ 
selves of will require a great deal of dialogue. I am 
much less concerned about the problem of student 
power than about the problem of student brains; after 
all, to help students use their brains effectively is a pri¬ 
mary function of the faculty. Although I greatly value 
the new humanitarianism and social interests of our 
students, I am worried about what seems to me to be 
an anti-scientific bias in some of them. I have heard 
some students express anti-scientific views to which I 
and many others of the senior faculty cannot subscribe. 
Part of my concern here is that this same trend is vis¬ 
ible in the wider community and in the legislatures. It 
is a distinctly anti-intellectual current against which we 
in the universities will have to defend ourselves. I think 
we are in danger of losing something very precious, a 
commitment to investigation that is essential to the 
proper performance of our task and of fundamental im¬ 
portance to society. I believe this feeling is shared by 
the President and Provost of Yale; the basis for my 
belief is the closer relationship that has developed in 
the past year between the School of Medicine and the 
rest of the University. 

In general, I believe this has been a good year. In 
spite of the threat of federal cutbacks in funds by a 
government which spends much on warfare and little 
on welfare and health, I feel optimistic about the future 
of our school. 


23 







In and About Sterling Hall 


Commencement 1969 

At Yale’s 268th commencement in 
June, 77 candidates received the Doc¬ 
tor of Medicine degree and 46 re¬ 
ceived the degree of Master of Public 
Health. Candidates in the School of 
Nursing who received the degree of 
Master of Science in Nursing num¬ 
bered 41. 

The M.D. degree cum laude, con¬ 
ferred on students whose work 
shows unusual merit, was awarded 
to Charles S. Angell, Daniel M. Eich- 
enbaum, Gary S. Farnham, David A. 
Geer, Lee M. Jampol, Robert L. Ma- 
rier, Timothy A. Pedley, David J. 
Sahn, Adrian M. Schnall, and Mi¬ 
chael S. Toren. 

The following prizes and awards 
were conferred on members of the 
graduating class: 

The Borden Undergraduate Re¬ 
search Award in Medicine to a grad¬ 
uating student whose research has 
been determined by the School of 
Medicine to be the most meritorious 
performed by all similarly eligible 
persons, originality and thorough¬ 
ness of research to be of primary 
consideration: Charles A. Dinarello. 

The Campbell Prize for the highest 
rank in the examinations of the 
course: David A. Geer. 

The Miriam Kathleen Dasey Award 
to that student who by strength of 
character, personal integrity, and 
academic achievement gives promise 
of fulfilling the ideal of the compas¬ 
sionate physician: Charles S. Angell. 

The Keese Prize to the student who 
presents the best thesis: David A. 
Berkowitz. 

The Parker Prize to the student 
who has shown the best qualifica¬ 
tions for a successful practitioner: 
Timothy A. Pedley. 

Prizes to students other than those 
in the graduating class included: 

The Perkins Scholarship Prize to 
the student making the best record in 
scholarship in the basic subjects of 
the medical and biological sciences: 
Robert D. Gilbert. 

The Ramsey Memorial Scholarship 
Prize to a student of unquestioned 


ability and character after complet¬ 
ing his first year in clinical medicine: 
Michael D. Danzig and Anne Weiss- 
man. 

The M. C. Winternitz Prize in Path¬ 
ology to the second-year student 
who, in the opinion of the Depart¬ 
ment of Pathology, has done out¬ 
standing work in the course: Robert 
Park. 



Dr. Morton Reiser Heads 
Department of Psychiatry 

Dr. Morton F. Reiser, a psychiatrist 
noted for his work in psychosomatic 
medicine, has been appointed chair¬ 
man of the Department of Psychiatry 
and director of the Connecticut Men¬ 
tal Health Center. 

As chairman of the Department of 
Psychiatry, Dr. Reiser succeeds Dr. 
Theodore Lidz, who has headed the 
department since 1967. In assuming 
the directorship of the Connecticut 
Mental Health Center, Dr. Reiser suc¬ 
ceeds Dr. Gerald L. Klerman, associ¬ 
ate professor of psychiatry, who has 
headed the State facility for the past 
two years. 

Dr. Reiser is widely recognized for 
his research contributions in psycho¬ 
somatic and psychophysiologic dis¬ 
orders as well as for his research on 
the psychological aspects of hyper¬ 
tension, heart disease, and cardio¬ 
vascular disorders. 

A native of Cincinnati, Ohio, Dr. 
Reiser graduated from the University 
of Cincinnati in 1940 and from the 
university’s medical school in 1943. 
He interned at Kings County Hospi¬ 


tal in New York and served his resi¬ 
dency at Cincinnati General Hospital. 
From 1947 to 1950 he was a psychiatry 
teaching fellow under the Common¬ 
wealth Fund Psychosomatic Program 
at that hospital. In 1950 he was ap¬ 
pointed assistant professor of psy¬ 
chiatry and internal medicine at the 
University of Cincinnati College of 
Medicine. 

After two years of military service 
at the Walter Reed Army Medical 
Center in the division of neuropsy¬ 
chiatry, he was appointed associate 
professor and director of research in 
the Department of Psychiatry at Al¬ 
bert Einstein College of Medicine. 
He was made a full professor in 1958 
and was named chief of psychiatry 
at Montefiore Hospital in 1965. 

He has held posts on the faculties 
of other institutions including the 
State University of New York Down- 
state Medical Center and the New 
York Psychoanalytic Institute, where 
he completed his own psychoanalytic 
training in 1960. 

A former president of the Ameri¬ 
can Psychosomatic Society, he is also 
a fellow of the American Psychiatric 
Association, a member of the Com¬ 
mittee on Training for Research of 
the American Psychoanalytic Asso¬ 
ciation, the American Federation for 
Clinical Research, and the American 
Society for Clinical Investigation. 

Dr. Kase Named 
Chairman of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology 

Dr. Nathan G. Kase, an authority on 
human fertility, has been named pro¬ 
fessor and chairman of the Depart¬ 
ment of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
He succeeds Dr. Edward J. Quilligan, 
department chairman since 1966, 
who has joined the faculty of the 
University of Southern California. 

Dr. Kase, who is noted for his re¬ 
search in gynecologic endocrinology 
and in steroid metabolism in women, 
has made important contributions to 
the understanding and treatment of 
infertility and related problems. 

He is also highly regarded for his 


24 














exceptional teaching ability and was 
the recipient in 1967 of the Francis 
j Gilman Blake Award for excellence 
in teaching. In 1968 he was elected to 
j Alpha Omega Alpha as a faculty 
member. 

A native of New York City, Dr. 
Kase received his B.A. degree in 1951 
and his M.D. degree in 1955, both 
from Columbia University. He served 
his internship and residency at Mt. 

! Sinai Hospital in New York and was 
chief resident in obstetrics and gyne¬ 
cology there in 1961-62. 

He joined the Yale faculty as an in¬ 
structor in the Department of Obstet¬ 
rics and Gynecology in 1962, and 
was promoted to assistant professor 
in 1963 and to associate professor in 
1966. Since 1964 Dr. Kase has been in 
charge of the Gynecologic Endocrine 
Clinic of the Yale-New Haven Hospi¬ 
tal where he has been concerned 
with the study and treatment of hor¬ 
monal imbalance in women. 

Dr. Kase is a member of the Amer¬ 
ican Fertility Society, the Society for 
Gynecologic Investigation, the Endo¬ 
crine Society, and Sigma Xi. 

New Department of Molecular 
Biophysics and Biochemistry 
Established 

A new department has been estab¬ 
lished to link graduate studies in bio¬ 
chemistry and biophysics with the 
teaching in these areas for medical 
students. The Department of Molec¬ 
ular Biophysics and Biochemistry 
represents a merger of the former 
Department of Molecular Biophysics, 


Dr. Richards 

which was located in Yale’s science 
complex on the north campus, and 
the former Department of Biochem¬ 
istry, which was located in the School 
of Medicine. 

Dr. Frederic M. Richards, Henry 
Ford II Professor of Molecular Bio¬ 
physics, is the chairman of the new 
department which will have quarters 
and facilities on both campuses. The 
faculty will instruct undergraduates 
in the departmental major, and can¬ 
didates for the M.S. and Ph.D. de¬ 
grees in the sciences concerned, as 
well as medical students. 

A major aim of the department is 
to encourage interaction between ad¬ 
vanced research in the biological sci¬ 
ences and the development of clinical 
techniques in medicine. Dr. Richards 
has pointed out that the real impact 
of molecular biology on medicine is 
only beginning to be felt. “At the 
present level of sophistication, the 
application of theory and technique 
to clinical problems is equivalent to 
the dissection of a watch with a 
sledge hammer,” he said. 

"The passage of information from 
theoretical chemistry and physics 
right through the various aspects of 
biochemistry and biophysics to clin¬ 
ical problems should be made as con¬ 
tinuous and effective as possible. For 
the guidance and constant correction 
of these efforts, the return flow of 
biological and medical observations 
to the chemists and physicists is es¬ 
sential. It is to such communication 
and interaction that the new depart¬ 
ment hopes to contribute and from 



which it hopes to benefit,” Dr. Rich¬ 
ards said. 

Dr. Richards is an authority on the 
chemistry of enzymes and is particu¬ 
larly noted for his research on ribo- 
nuclease. A graduate of Massachu¬ 
setts Institute of Technology, he re¬ 
ceived the Ph.D. degree from Harvard 
in 1952. He subsequently held fellow¬ 
ships at Harvard and at the Carls- 
berg Laboratorium in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, before being appointed as¬ 
sistant professor of biochemistry at 
Yale in 1954. He was promoted to 
associated professor in 1959 and to 
professor in 1962. 

He was chairman of the Depart¬ 
ment of Molecular Biophysics for 
four years beginning in 1963 and was 
named Henry Ford Professor in 1967. 
He held a Guggenheim Foundation 
Fellowship in 1967-68 and during 
that year was a visiting fellow at All 
Souls College, Oxford. 

Dr. Lewis Thomas Appointed 
Chairman of Pathology 

Dr. Lewis Thomas, former dean of 
the New York University School of 
Medicine, has been named professor 
and chairman of the Department of 
Pathology. He succeeds Dr. Harry 
S. N. Greene, Anthony N. Brady Pro¬ 
fessor of Pathology, who died last 
February. 

Formerly a professor and chairman 
of academic departments of medicine 
and pathology, as well as a research 
professor of pediatrics, Dr. Thomas 
is noted for his research on infec¬ 
tious disease. He has conducted ex¬ 
tensive studies on mechanisms of 
tissue injury due to infectious agents 
and microbial toxins, the property of 
cortisone to lower resistance to in¬ 
fection, and the pathogenesis of my¬ 
coplasma diseases. 

He received his B.S. degree from 
Princeton University in 1933 and the 
M.D. degree cum Jaude from Harvard 
in 1937. He interned at Boston City 
Hospital and served a residency in 
neurology at the Neurological Insti¬ 
tute in New York. 

After military service, Dr. Thomas 


25 









Dr. Thomas 

joined the faculty of the Johns Hop¬ 
kins University School of Medicine, 
serving at the same time as director 
of the Bacteriological Laboratory of 
the Harriet Lane Home for Invalid 
Children of the Johns Hopkins Hos¬ 
pital. In 1948 he was appointed asso¬ 
ciate professor of medicine and 
director of the Division of Infectious 
Disease at the Tulane University 
School of Medicine and was pro¬ 
moted to professor in 1950. From 
1950 to 1954 he held the American 
Legion Heart Research Professorship 
in Pediatrics and Internal Medicine 
at the University of Minnesota Med¬ 
ical School. 

Dr. Thomas first joined the faculty 
of New York University in 1954 as 
professor and chairman of the De¬ 
partment of Pathology. In 1958 he 
was named chairman of the Depart¬ 
ment of Medicine. From 1966 until 
this fall he was dean of the univer¬ 
sity’s medical school. 

He is a member of the President’s 
Science Advisory Committee and the 
New York City Board of Health. He 
has been a consultant to numerous 
government and private organiza¬ 
tions, including the Sloan-Kettering 
Institute for Cancer Research. 

Dr. McCollum is New Chairman 
of Epidemiology and Public Health 

Dr. Robert W. McCollum, professor 
of epidemiology and an authority on 
viral diseases, has been named chair¬ 
man of the Department of Epidemiol¬ 
ogy and Public Health. He succeeds 
Dr. Adrian M. Ostfeld, who has re¬ 



turned to his research in chronic dis¬ 
ease epidemiology. 

A member of the Yale faculty 
since 1954, Dr. McCollum is noted 
for his work in the field of hepatitis, 
its epidemiology and virology, as 
well as for his studies of poliomy¬ 
elitis, infectious mononucleosis, 
mumps, and rubella. Most recently 
he has worked on rubella vaccine 
studies and in 1968 directed the first 
large-scale field trials in the United 
States of HPV-77, which earlier this 
year became the first rubella vaccine 
licensed by the federal government. 


Dr. McCollum 



Board since 1958, and a consultant 
to the Surgeon General of the U.S. 
Army since 1961. 

Dr. McCollum, who holds a diplo¬ 
ma in public health from the Lon¬ 
don School of Hygiene and Tropical 
Medicine, worked with Dr. John R. 
Paul in the Yale Poliomyelitis Study 
Unit where he collaborated with Dr. 
Dorothy Horstmann in the 1950's in 
demonstrating the presence of polio¬ 
virus in the circulating blood. The 
finding contributed significantly to - 
the later development of a polio vac¬ 
cine. 


Dr. Silver 



Dr. McCollum graduated from 
Baylor University and received the 
M.D. degree in 1948 from Johns Hop¬ 
kins. He interned at Presbyterian 
Hospital in New York and Vander¬ 
bilt University Hospital and was an 
assistant resident in medicine at 
Yale-New Haven Hospital in 1950- 
51. From 1952 to 1954 he served in 
the Army Medical Corps with the 
406th Medical General Laboratory in 
Tokyo and was a member of the 
Hemorrhagic Fever Field Team in 
Korea. 

Named to the Yale faculty as as¬ 
sistant professor of preventive medi¬ 
cine in 1954, he was promoted to 
associate professor of epidemiology 
in 1960 and to professor in 1965. He 
was a consultant to the Second 
World Health Organization Expert 
Committee on Hepatitis in 1962-63. 
He has been a member of the Com¬ 
mission on Viral Infections of the 
Armed Forces Epidemiological 


Recent Appointments 

Dr. George Albert Silver, former 
Deputy Assistant Secretary of 
Health, has been named professor of 
public health at the Yale School of 
Medicine. An authority on problems 
of urban health, Dr. Silver served as 

1 

assistant to John W. Gardner, Sec¬ 
retary of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, from 1966 to 1968. When 
Dr. Gardner resigned in 1968 to 
head the Urban Coalition, Dr. Silver 
joined his new staff as executive 
associate, responsible for program 
planning in health matters. 

Dr. Silver received his B.A. de¬ 
gree from the University of Penn¬ 
sylvania in 1934, and his M.D. 
degree from Jefferson Medical Col¬ 
lege in 1938. In 1948 he was awarded 
the M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins Uni¬ 
versity. 

He has been on the faculties of a 
number of major universities includ¬ 
ing Columbia, Johns Hopkins, Al- 


26 







bert Einstein College of Medicine 
and the University of Michigan as 
a key figure in the fields of public 
health administration and preven¬ 
tive and environmental medicine. 

Dr. Venkatram N. Iyer of the De¬ 
partment of Biology at Carleton 
University in Ottawa has been ap¬ 
pointed visiting professor of radio- 
biology in the Department of 
Radiology for the period July to 
December 1969. Dr. Iyer is an au¬ 
thority in the field of genetic recom¬ 
bination mechanisms and the regu¬ 
lation of episomal replication and 
segregation. 

Other recent appointments to the 
medical faculty include Dr. James 
B. L. Gee, associate professor of 
medicine, and Dr. Charles N. Gillis, 
associate professor of anesthesiol¬ 
ogy (pharmacologyj. Dr. Gee, who 
received his M.D. from Guy’s Hos¬ 
pital Medical School in London in 
1953, has been on the faculty of the 
University of Pittsburgh School of 
Medicine since 1965 and chief of 
the Pulmonary Service at their Vet¬ 
erans Administration Hospital. Ex¬ 
perienced as a physiologist and 
chest physician, he will be in charge 
of the clinical laboratories, clinics, 
and consultation services concerned 
with pulmonary disease at the Yale- 
New Haven Medical Center. 

Dr. Gillis, who holds a Ph.D. de¬ 
gree in pharmacology from Glasgow 
University, Scotland, was a mem¬ 
ber of the Yale Department of Phar¬ 
macology from 1961 to 1968 when 
he left to become head of the Section 
of Cardiovascular and Autonomic 
Pharmacology at the Squibb Insti¬ 
tute for Medical Research in New 
Brunswick, New Jersey. He returns 
to Yale to participate in a program 
of advanced research and research 
training in the pharmacology of 
anesthesia, particularly as it relates 
to the sympathetic nervous system. 

Recent administrative staff ap¬ 
pointments include Barry J. Solomon 
as an assistant to the dean and Peter 
Stangl as assistant librarian in the 
Yale Medical Library. Mr. Solomon, 
a lecturer in public health, was for¬ 


merly administrator of the Hill 
Health Center. In his new post, he is 
undertaking a review and evalua¬ 
tion of systems and procedures re¬ 
lating to clinical practice by mem¬ 
bers of the full-time faculty. Mr. 
Stangl, who has been a library re¬ 
search associate at Yale since 1967, 
is the first person to hold the title of 
assistant librarian at the medical li¬ 
brary since the death of Henrietta 
T. Perkins in 1962. 


Dr. White Appointed 

Ira Vaughan Hiscock Professor 

Dr. Colin White, an authority in the 
fields of biometry and statistical 
epidemiology, has been named the 
first incumbent of the Ira Vaughan 
Hiscock Professorship of Public 
Health, established under the be¬ 
quest of the late Susan Dwight Bliss. 
Dr. Hiscock, Anna M. R. Lauder Pro¬ 
fessor Emeritus of Public Health, is 
one of the country’s foremost spe¬ 
cialists in public health administra¬ 
tion. Although he retired as chairman 
of the Department of Public Health 
in 1960, he has remained active, na¬ 
tionally and internationally, as a con¬ 
sultant. 

Dr. White, a member of the epi¬ 
demiology and public health faculty 
for the past 16 years, is noted for his 
research contributions in statistical 
methodology, including nonparamet- 


ric methods of statistical analysis, 
design of epidemiological investiga¬ 
tions, and vital statistics. 

He is recognized as an outstanding 
teacher and has served as technical 
advisor to the National Institutes of 
Health and to the Surgeon General 
on matters concerned with research 
training. He was a member of the 
NIH Advisory Committee on Epide¬ 
miology and Biometry from 1960 to 
1966. 


A native of Australia, Dr. White 
received his undergraduate and med¬ 
ical degrees from the University of 
Sydney and served as a medical offi¬ 
cer with the Commonwealth Depart¬ 
ment of Health from 1943 to 1946. 
Before coming to Yale in 1953, he 
lectured in physiology at the Univer¬ 
sity of Birmingham in England and 
the University of Pennsylvania. He 
has headed the Section of Biometry 
in the Department of Epidemiology 
and Public Health since 1962. 

Faculty Honors and Awards 

Two members of the Yale medical 
faculty received honorary degrees in 
June. They are Dr. Fredrick C. Red- 
lich, dean of the medical school, and 
Dr. Edmund S. Crelin, professor of 
anatomy. 

Dean Redlich was awarded an hon¬ 
orary doctor of science degree from 



Hiscock Professor and Professor Hiscock 


27 












Wittenberg University in Springfield, 
Ohio. The citation stated: “Educated 
in your native Austria . . . except for 
your year at Wittenberg . . . you have 
nonetheless devoted most of your 
adult life to the advancement of 
medical science, especially psychia¬ 
try, in your adopted country, exert¬ 
ing outstanding leadership through 
your teaching and administration at 
Yale, direction of the Connecticut 
Mental Health Center, service with 
the medical corps, and authorship of 
scientific works.” 

Professor Crelin received an hon¬ 
orary doctor of science degree from 
his alma mater, Central College, in 
Pella, Iowa. The citation read in part: 
“. . . We honor in you the talented 
master teacher, the midwife whose 
vision and patience help to give 
shape and life to blind fumbling 
forces.” 

Dr. Alvan R. Feinstein, professor of 
medicine and epidemiology, received 
the 1969 Francis Gilman Blake Award, 
given annually to the member of the 
Yale medical faculty designated by 
the fourth-year class as their most 
outstanding teacher of the medical 
sciences. The award honors a former 
dean and professor of medicine and 
is sponsored by the Nu Sigma Soci¬ 
ety. 

Dr. Thomas F. Emery, associate 
professor of biochemistry, was one 
of two recipients of the Gibbs Soci¬ 
ety Teaching Award, an award given 
each year by the society to the best 
science teacher at the assistant or 
associate professor level. Generally, 
only one award is made, but this year 
Dr. Richard Goldsby, assistant pro¬ 
fessor of biology, w r as likewise hon¬ 
ored for excellence in teaching. 

Dr. Franklin H. Epstein, professor 
of medicine, was elected vice-presi¬ 
dent of the American Society of 
Clinical Investigation at the annual 
meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey, 
in June. 

Dr Gerald Klatskin, David Paige 
Smith Professor of Medicine, was 
given an award by the American 
Medical Writers Association for a 
meritorious paper published in a bio¬ 


medical journal. The award-winning 
paper, “Recurrent Hepatitis Attrib¬ 
utable to Halothane Sensitization in 
an Anesthetist,” was written in col¬ 
laboration with Dr. Daniel V. Kim- 
berg, of Beth Israel Hospital in 
Boston, Massachusetts. The award 
was presented at the annual meeting 
of the organization at the Statler Hil¬ 
ton Hotel in Philadelphia on Septem¬ 
ber 19. 

Dr. R.J.C. Pearson is Associate Dean 
for Regional Activities 

Dr. R. John C. Pearson has been ap¬ 
pointed associate dean for regional 
activities and director of the new 
Office of Regional Activities at the 
Yale School of Medicine. This office, 
which was established by an agree¬ 
ment with the Connecticut Regional 
Medical Program, will be responsi¬ 
ble for coordinating the regional ac¬ 
tivities of the medical center as well 
as providing a liaison with the CRMP 
and other organizations and agen¬ 
cies concerned with regional medical 
activities. 

Concurrently, Dr. Pearson has 
been appointed an assistant profes¬ 
sor of public health in the health care 
section and will devote a portion of 
his time to teaching and research. 

Dr. Pearson received his B.A. de¬ 
gree in 1951, the Ch.B. in 1954 and 
the M.B. and M.A. degrees in 1955, 
all from Cambridge University in 
England. In 1960 he was awarded the 
M.P.H. degree from Yale University. 
In that year, he was named field di¬ 
rector for Dr. John R. Paul’s Middle- 
town oral polio vaccine program. Dr. 
Pearson has had wide experience in 
various aspects of community medi¬ 
cine with special reference to dis¬ 
eases — their incidence, prevalence, 
and control. In addition to directing 
studies on aspects of medical care, 
he has published material on com¬ 
parative studies of community medi¬ 
cal problems in this country and in 
several European countries. 

Before his present appointment, 
Dr. Pearson was an assistant profes¬ 
sor of community medicine at Brown 


University in Providence, Rhode 
Island. 

Conference on School of Medicine- 
Community Hospital Relationships 

Ways to achieve more effective 
working relationships between the 
community hospitals in southern 
Connecticut and the Yale School of 
Medicine was the subject of a special 
invitational conference held at the 
medical school on September 9. 
Speakers included Dean Redlich; 
Associate Dean Arthur Ebbert, Jr., 
chairman of the Yale-New Haven 
Medical Center Committee on Re¬ 
gional activities; John D. Thompson, 
associate dean for planning and pro¬ 
fessor of public health; Frank T. 
Healy, Jr., Waterbury attorney and 
president of the Connecticut Hospi¬ 
tal Association; Herbert A. Ander¬ 
son, executive vice president of the 
Connecticut Hospital Association; 
and Henry T. Clark, Jr., program co¬ 
ordinator of the Connecticut Re¬ 
gional Medical Program. 

Representatives of 18 community 
hospitals attended this half-day 
meeting which was arranged by the 
medical center’s Committee on 
Regional Activities. Participants in¬ 
cluded administrators of the com¬ 
munity hospitals as well as repre¬ 
sentatives of the medical staffs, 
nursing staffs, and boards of trus¬ 
tees. 

Proceedings of this conference 
will be published. Copies may be 
obtained without charge by writing 
to: Director of Regional Activities, 
Yale University School of Medicine, 
333 Cedar Street, New Haven, Con¬ 
necticut 06510. 

Symposium on Malnutrition 
and Human Deficits 

The Department of Pediatrics was 
host to a symposium on malnutri¬ 
tion and human deficits on Septem¬ 
ber 29. The conference, which was 
held at the Child Study Center, also 
included participants from the De¬ 
partments of Epidemiology and Pub¬ 
lic Health, Sociology, Psychology, 
and Psychiatry at Yale, as well as 


28 







individuals from Harvard, Massachu¬ 
setts Institute of Technology, and 
interested federal agencies. The 
meeting was concerned with the 
Harvard-Yale research enterprises 
in North Africa and was convened to 
exchange information derived from 
ongoing studies. Although malnutri¬ 
tion is considered a major variable 
associated with human defects, 
other major variables, such as in¬ 
fection and child-rearing practices, 
were not excluded. 

The symposium was coordinated 
by Dr. H. J. Boutourline-Young, as¬ 
sistant professor of pediatrics at 
Yale, who is director of the Yale- 
Harvard Center in Florence, Italy, 
j and of the Harvard-Yale Urban 
Studies in Tunis and consultant to 
the Rural Studies in Tunis. Funding 
agencies for the three studies have 
been the National Center of Health 
Statistics of the Department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare; the 
Grant Foundation of New York; and 
the Agency for International Devel¬ 
opment. 

Professors Emeriti 

Two distinguished physiologists, Dr. 
Donald Barron and Dr. C. N. Hugh 
Long, were named professors emer¬ 
iti on June 30. 

Dr. Barron, a member of the med¬ 
ical faculty for 29 years, is an au¬ 
thority on the physiological aspects 
of the fetal-maternal relationships. 
He is noted for his studies of the 
effects of high altitudes on the oxy¬ 
gen supply of fetal sheep and llamas, 
and was the first investigator to 
make accurate quantitative measure¬ 
ments of the transfer of nutrients 
and gases across the placenta. This 
September he became the first en¬ 
cumbent of the first endowed chair 
at the University of Florida in 
Gainesville, the J. Wayne Reitz Pro¬ 
fessorship of Reproductive Biology 
and Medicine. 

Dr. Long, a former dean of the 
medical school as well as a former 
chairman of the physiology and 
pharmacology departments, is inter¬ 


nationally known for his work in 
metabolism and endrocrinology. He 
was among the first to demonstrate 
the role of the adrenal cortex in 
carbohydrate metabolism and pro¬ 
tein metabolism, as well as the use 
of adrenal cortical hormones as 
therapeutic agents. He is now a fel¬ 
low of the scientific staff of the 
John N. Pierce Foundation Labora¬ 
tory, where he is teaching in the 
graduate program on environmental 
physiology. 

Promotions 

The following members of the med¬ 
ical faculty have been promoted to 
the rank of professor: 

Dr. Joseph R. Bertino, professor 
of medicine and pharmacology, re¬ 
ceived his M.D. degree from the 
State University of New York Col¬ 
lege of Medicine in Brooklyn in 
1954 and has been a member of the 
Yale faculty since 1961. He is known 
for his research on folic acid metab¬ 
olism and in the field of cancer 
chemotherapy. In 1966 he was 
named head of the Oncology and 
Chemotherapy Section of the De¬ 
partments of Pharmacology and 
Medicine. 

Dr. Peter F. Curran, professor of 
physiology, received his Ph.D. de¬ 
gree from Harvard in 1958. Follow¬ 
ing two years as a research fellow 
at the University of Copenhagen, he 
joined the Harvard faculty and was 
an assistant professor of biophysics 
prior to his appointment as an asso¬ 
ciate professor of physiology at 
Yale in 1967. Dr. Curran has studied 
basic physiological mechanisms con¬ 
cerned with transport in epithelial 
structures and is currently investi¬ 
gating transport of materials across 
the intestinal mucosa. 

Dr. Alvan R. Feinstein, professor 
of medicine and epidemiology, a 
graduate of the University of Chi¬ 
cago School of Medicine in 1952, 
was an intern and assistant resident 
at the New Haven Hospital and then 
served at the Rockefeller Institute 
in New York City. In 1956 he was 
appointed to the staff of Irvington 


House and was its medical director 
from 1957 to 1962, when he returned 
to New Haven as chief of clinical 
pharmacology at the Veterans Ad¬ 
ministration Hospital and a member 
of the Yale faculty. He has recently 
been named chief of the Veterans 
Administration Eastern Research 
Support Center, which is located at 
the West Haven Veterans Adminis¬ 
tration Hospital. Dr. Feinstein, wide¬ 
ly known for his book entitled 
Clinical Judgment, is a leading ex¬ 
ponent of the application of mathe¬ 
matical logic to problems of diag¬ 
nosis and prognosis. 

Dr. Adolf P. Gagge, professor of 
epidemiology, an internationally re¬ 
nowned environmental physiologist 
who has made significant contribu¬ 
tions in the held of thermal effects 
on man, is a member of the John B. 
Pierce Foundation. Having received 
his Ph.D. from Yale in 1933, Dr. 
Gagge joined the staff of the Pierce 
Foundation and was a research as¬ 
sociate in biophysics at Yale. In 
1941 he became chief of the Bio¬ 
physics Branch of the Aero-Medical 
Laboratory at Wright Field. After 
the war he continued his scientific 
research in the U.S. Air Force. He 
returned to Yale in 1963 as an asso¬ 
ciate professor of physiology and in 
1968 was named associate professor 
of epidemiology. 

Dr. Kenneth Keniston, professor 
of psychology in the Department of 
Psychiatry, is a graduate of Harvard 
College and received his Ph.D. from 
Oxford University in 1956. He joined 
the Yale faculty in 1962 as an assist¬ 
ant professor. He is nationally and 
internationally known for his under¬ 
standing of today’s college students 
and is the author of two books on 
this generation: The Uncommitted: 
Alienated Youth in American So¬ 
ciety and Young Radicals: Notes on 
Committed Youth. 

Dr. William H. Miller, professor 
of surgery (ophthalmology) and 
physiology, received his M.D. de¬ 
gree from Johns Hopkins University 
in 1954. Following internship at Bal¬ 
timore City Hospital, he was on the 


29 







staff at the Rockefeller Institute un¬ 
til coming to Yale as an associate 
professor of physiology (ophthal¬ 
mology] in 1964. His investigative 
work in visual physiology is cur¬ 
rently concerned with the interac¬ 
tion of light with eye structures that 
have characteristic dimensions in 
the order of the wave lengths of 
light. He has made major contribu¬ 
tions in the fields of anatomy, insect 
dioptrics, and electrophysiology. 

Dr. Patrick J. Mulrow, professor 
of medicine, received his M.D. de¬ 
gree from Cornell University in 1951 
and was a house officer at The New 
York Hospital. After serving as a 
research fellow at Cornell Medical 
College and at Stanford University 
School of Medicine, he joined the 
Yale faculty in 1957 as an instructor 
in medicine. Dr. Mulrow is an au¬ 
thority on the control of aldoster¬ 
ones and the renin angiotensin sys¬ 
tem in control of blood pressure. 
He is in charge of the Endocrine 
Section of the Department of Medi¬ 
cine and has also served as director 
of the Clinical Research Center. 

Dr. Marvin L. Sears, professor of 
ophthalmology, has been chief of 
the Section of Ophthalmology at 
Yale since 1961. He is a graduate of 
Columbia University College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, and fol¬ 
lowing an internship at Bellevue 
Hospital in New York City, he re¬ 
ceived his residency training at the 
Wilmer Institute of the Johns Hop¬ 
kins Hospital. In addition to his 
reputation as a clinician and sur¬ 
geon, Dr. Sears is nationally known 
for his basic investigative work in 
the field of glaucoma. 

Dr. Norman S. Talner, professor 
of pediatrics, received his M.D. de¬ 
gree from the University of Michi¬ 
gan in 1949. After internship and 
residency at Kings County Hospital 
in Brooklyn, he returned to the 
University of Michigan and was an 
assistant professor of pediatrics 
when he moved to Yale in 1960. He 
has served as director of the Pedi¬ 
atric Cardiopulmonary Laboratory 


since that time. His investigative 
contributions, which have included 
both clinical and animal studies, 
have led to improvements in the 
diagnosis and care of pediatric car¬ 
diac patients. 

The following members of the 
faculty were promoted to the rank 
of associate professor, effective July 
1: Malcolm B. Bowers, M.D., psy¬ 
chiatry; Alexander G. M. Campbell, 
M.D., Ch.B., pediatrics; Hyman M. 
Chernoff, M.D., clinical medicine; 
Louis B. Fierman, M.D., clinical psy¬ 
chiatry; Walter J. Gehring, Ph.D., 
anatomy; Lewis E. Gibson, M.D., 
pediatrics; Robert H. Glass, M.D., 
obstetrics and gynecology; Richard 
H. Granger, M.D., clinical pediatrics; 
Richard A. Greenberg, Ph.D., public 
health (biometry); Joyce D. Gry- 
boski, M.D., clinical pediatrics; Mar¬ 
tin Harrow, Ph.D., psychology in 
psychiatry; Rufus O. Howard, M.D., 
ophthalmology; Edith Hsiung, Ph.D., 
laboratory medicine; Albert M. 
Jonas, D.V.M., laboratory animal sci¬ 
ence; Sidney N. Klaus, M.D., der¬ 
matology; Edward B. Klein, Ph.D., 
psychology in psychiatry; Ernest J. 
Kohorn, M.B., B.Ch., obstetrics and 
gynecology; Thomas L. Lentz, M.D., 
anatomy; Martha F. Leonard, M.D., 
clinical pediatrics; Stephen E. Ma- 
lawista, M.D., medicine; John B. 
McKee, M.D., clinical psychiatry; 
Yale Nemerson, M.D., medicine; 
Jonathan H. Pincus, M.D., neurol¬ 
ogy; Milton H. Sangree, Jr., M.D., 
clinical medicine; Donald P. Schil- 
der, M.D., medicine; Hyman K. 
Schonfeld, Dr.P.H., public health 
(medical care); Robert I. Schrier, 
M.D., clinical anesthesiology; Mar¬ 
tin S. Schwartz, Ph.D., clinical psy¬ 
chiatry (social work); Gordon M. 
Shepard, M.D., physiology; Horace 
C. Stansel, M.D., surgery; Jan A. J. 
Stolwijk, Ph.D., epidemiology (en¬ 
vironmental physiology); Alexander 
W. C. von Graevenitz, M.D., labora¬ 
tory medicine and microbiology; 
Maclyn E. Wade, M.D., obstetrics 
and gynecology; Grace Wyshak, 
Ph.D., public health (biometry). 


Faculty Notes 

Dr. Gilbert H. Glaser, professor of 
neurology, has been elected first vice 
president of the American Academy 
of Neurology. He has also been 
named to the board of directors of the 
Epilepsy Foundation of America. 

In early October Dr. Glaser was a 
visiting lecturer at the University of 
Minnesota School of Medicine where 
he spoke on neurologic manifesta¬ 
tions of adrenal and pituitary disease 
and neurologic aspects of renal dis¬ 
ease. At the International Congress 
on Electroencephalography and Clin¬ 
ical Neurophysiology in San Diego, 
September 13-19, he organized and 
chaired the conference presentation 
on the electroencephalogram in met¬ 
abolic, endocrine and toxic disor¬ 
ders. Last May, as visiting professor 
of neurology at the University of 
North Carolina, he lectured on cere¬ 
bral ionic environment and epilepsy. 

Dr. Byron H. Waksman, professor 
of microbiology, was in South Amer¬ 
ica in June and July to deliver a series 
of lectures on cellular immunology 
in connection with the opening of a 
new research center at the Faculdade 
de Ciencias Medicas da Universi- 
dade de Guanabara, a major medical 
school in Rio de Janeiro. Dr. Waks¬ 
man also lectured in Recife, Brazil, 
and in Buenos Aires and Mendoza in 
Argentina. 

Dr. Norman Cameron, professor 
emeritus of psychiatry, received the 
Frieda Fromm-Reichman Award for 
Research in Schizophrenia of the 
American Academy of Psychoanal¬ 
ysis in the spring. The award honors 
Dr. Cameron’s many basic contribu¬ 
tions to that field of research over the 
past thirty years. 

Several members of the Yale medi¬ 
cal faculty attended the Fourth In¬ 
ternational Congress of Nephrology 
held in Stockholm, Sweden, in June. 
Dr. Michael Weiner, research fellow 
in medicine, reported on some exper¬ 
imental kidney research being done 
by Drs. John Hayslett and Franklin 
Epstein of the Department of In¬ 
ternal Medicine and Dr. Michael 


30 







Kashgarian of the Department of 
Pathology. Other members of the 
renal group who delivered papers on 
their research included Drs. Epstein, 
Ernesto Hendler, George Torretti, 
and Edward Weinstein. 

Additional material was presented 
by Dr. Hayslett, covering research 
by Drs. Epstein and Kashgarian, at a 
special symposium in Prague, 
Czechoslovakia. 

Dr. Roy M. Acheson, professor of 
epidemiology, has returned after a 
sabbatical year as a senior travelling 
fellow at the London School of Hy¬ 
giene and Tropical Medicine under 
the auspices of the Commonwealth 
Fund. In addition to his tour of duty 
in London, he was invited to lecture 
at the First Roumanian National 
Conference on Epidemiology in Bu¬ 
charest as a guest of the Roumanian 
Academy of Science. His lecture con¬ 
cerned predictions of blood pressure, 
given certain data including age, 
physique, and blood glucose. At Uni¬ 
versity Hospital, Copenhagen, where 
he was the guest of the Danish So¬ 
ciety for Social Medicine, he spoke 
on screening populations in chronic 
disease. In June he lectured at Uni¬ 
versity Hospital, Caracas, at the in¬ 
vitation of the Venezuelan Associa¬ 
tion of Medical Schools; his subject 
was “Some Epidemiological Contri¬ 
butions to Contemporary Clinical 
Thought.” 

New Books 

DUNCAN’S DISEASES OF METAB¬ 
OLISM (in two volumes, available 
separately). Edited by Philip K. Bon- 
dy, C.N.H. Long Professor of Medi¬ 
cine and chairman, Department of 
Internal Medicine, in association with 
Leon E. Rosenberg, associate profes¬ 
sor of medicine and pediatrics (W. B. 
Saunders Company). The editor and 
his collaborators have incorporated 
in this new sixth edition of the clas¬ 
sic text a framework for the organ¬ 
ized study of metabolic processes 
and the diagnosis and treatment of 
metabolic disorders. 

Volume I, Genetics and Metabo¬ 


lism, includes chapters on genetic 
structure and function and the inter¬ 
action and conversion of the organ¬ 
ism’s genetic composition in body 
functioning. There is also detailed 
material on disorders and the abnor¬ 
malities and diseases of metabolic 
and genetic origin. Volume II, Endo¬ 
crinology and Nutrition, deals with 
the influence of hormones and diet 
on the metabolic processes with a 
detailed discussion of each of the 
endocrine glands. 

Other contributors from the Yale 
medical faculty include Drs. Thomas 
T. Amatruda, Jr., George Brawerman, 
Joseph E. Coleman, Nathan G. Kase, 
William Konigsberg, Robert J. Le¬ 
vine, Howard Levitin, Patrick J. Mul- 
row, Robert L. Scheig, and Sherman 
M. Weissman. 

SOCIAL MEDICINE IN EASTERN 
EUROPE by E. Richard Weinerman, 
professor of medicine and public 
health, with the assistance of Shirley 
B. Weinerman (Harvard University 
Press). The subtitle, The Organiza¬ 
tion of Health Services and the Edu¬ 
cation of Medical Personnel in 
Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Po¬ 
land, defines the geographical limits 
of this well-organized and concise 
study. The authors’ investigation 
was under the auspices of the World 
Health Organization and financed by 
the Commonwealth Fund, Yale Uni¬ 
versity, and the Yale-New Haven 
Hospital. In addition to gathering 
data on the organization of health 
services and on the education of 
medical personnel, they have en¬ 
deavored to assess the impact of 
these two factors on medical prac¬ 
tices, as well as the relationship of 
research and teaching in social medi¬ 
cine on the social factors affecting 
health. 

The book is divided into four sec¬ 
tions: 1) general observations which 
include something of the authors’ 
methodology and brief commentary 
on some of the socio-economic as¬ 
pects of these three socialist coun¬ 
tries; 2) facts and figures on the three 
countries studied; 3) personal com¬ 


mentary and conclusions with the 
authors’ own evaluation of the prog¬ 
ress and direction of medical health 
care resources, research facilities, 
and medical education; and 4) an ap¬ 
pendix listing persons and facilities 
visited in each country. 

For the last thirty years, constant 
change has marked the environmen¬ 
tal and health-related activities in 
the three countries. Destruction of 
health facilities, loss of professional 
personnel, and population shifts 
were among the products of World 
War II and German or Russian oc¬ 
cupation. Rapid post-war urbaniza¬ 
tion, the authors point out, has both 
added to and ameliorated problems 
of health care facilities and services. 

Tables of comparative expendi¬ 
tures, organization, health resources, 
and other data, sprinkled throughout 
the book, serve to graphically sum¬ 
marize material in the text. 



Charles Lee Buxton, M.D. 

Dr. Charles Lee Buxton, professor of 
obstetrics and gynecology, died on 
July 7 at the age of 64. He had been 
ill for several months, having suf¬ 
fered a series of heart attacks. 

Dr. Buxton was born in Superior, 
Wisconsin, but spent most of his 
early years in St. Paul, Minnesota. 
He attended the Lawrenceville School 
and received the B.S. degree at 
Princeton in 1927. Columbia Univer¬ 
sity awarded him the M.D. degree in 
1932 and the Med. Sc.D. degree in 


31 








1940. During the five years after grad¬ 
uation from medical school he was 
an intern at the Mary Imogene Bas¬ 
sett Hospital in Cooperstown, New 
York, a research fellow in endocrin¬ 
ology at the Harvard Medical School, 
and resident in obstetrics and gyne¬ 
cology at the Columbia-Presbyterian 
Medical Center. On completion of 
his training, he joined the faculty of 
the College of Physicians and Sur¬ 
geons, Columbia University, and rose 
through the ranks to professor in 
1951. 

During World War II, Dr. Buxton 
served in the Medical Corps of the 
U.S. Navy and retired with the rank 
of commander. 

In 1954 he succeeded Dr. Herbert 
Thoms as professor and chairman of 
the Department of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology at Yale and was respon¬ 
sible for its remarkable growth over 


Alumni News 

1929 

Class secretary RUSSELL SCOBIE 
sent the following report on the class 
reunion: “From the 40th observation 
tower, May 24 was a total success. 
Present with wives were ROBERT 
FRISCH, GEORGE GOLDMAN, 
VERNON LIPPARD, PAUL Mc- 
ALENNEY, WILLIAM ROTH, ROB¬ 
ERT TENNANT, FELIX TOMAINO, 
ERWIN TRACY, JULIUS WINTER, 
HERMAN YANNET and RUSSELL 
SCOBIE. Also attending but without 
wives were: FRANK D’ANDREA, 
CHARLES EPSTEIN, and WILLIAM 
ROTH. 

“For those who attended the morn¬ 
ing seminars at 10:30, the next 
twelve hours were completely filled 
and the piece de resistance was our 
private dinner party for 23 at the 
Graduate Club. At least five others 
had planned to come but didn’t make 
it. The consensus was that it was a 
most informal, relaxing, and enjoy¬ 
able evening. The entire cast of ac¬ 
tors that matriculated in September 
1925 were accounted for and there 


the next twelve years. After his re¬ 
tirement from the chairmanship, he 
remained active as a teacher and in¬ 
vestigator until his death. 

To the general public, Dr. Buxton 
was best known for his courageous 
and successful fight against Connec¬ 
ticut’s birth control laws. One of the 
nation’s leading crusaders in behalf 
of planned parenthood, he was the 
key figure in the legal battle that 
ended in the decision of the United 
States Supreme Court to abolish the 
State’s antiquated statutes prohibit¬ 
ing dissemination of birth control in¬ 
formation. 

In the medical world, he was rec¬ 
ognized as an authority on infertility. 
In addition to numerous articles in 
professional j ournals, he collaborated 
on two volumes: Diagnosis and Ther¬ 
apy of Gynecological and Endocrine 
Disorders (1949) with E. T. Engle and 


is no doubt that the more who show 
up, the better the day. 

“The above mentioned hope that 
1974 may be good to us so that we 
can recharge our Yale batteries. 
After all, Roth and Epstein made it 
for the first time since graduation. 
Also HAROLD HARRIS (ex-’29) 
joined us at lunch.” 

1939 

STUART S. STEVENSON, class sec¬ 
retary, reported on the class’s 30th 
reunion: “Present were: COPPER¬ 
SMITH, DRUCKEMILLER, ERNST, 
FORMAN, GREENFIELD, KENIGS- 
BERG, MURPHY, SARASON, STE¬ 
VENSON, VOORHEES, and WALK¬ 
ER, plus ten beautiful wives, plus 
young Bill Druckemiller who is in 
his first year at the medical school. 
Bill proved to be more than adequate 
in his handling of Yale songs and 
thus was judged fit to be adopted by 
our class. 

“After spending the day enjoying 
the scientific program and especially 
the Alumni-Student dialogue in the 
afternoon, we joined with our other 


Human Infertility (1958) with A. L. 
Southam, and also published Psycho¬ 
physical Methods for Relief of Child¬ 
birth Pain (1962). 

He was a fellow of the American 
College of Obstetrics and Gynecol¬ 
ogy, the American Association of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology, the 
American Fertility Society, and pres¬ 
ident, in 1959, of the American So¬ 
ciety for the Study of Sterility. He 
received the award of the Albert and 
Mary Lasker Foundation in 1965 and 
the Ortho Medal of the American So¬ 
ciety for the Study of Fertility in 
1968. 

Lee Buxton will be remembered 
with affection by his colleagues, by 
patients from all over the world who 
sought his advice on problems of 
sterility, and by a generation of stu¬ 
dents and house officers to whom he 
was devoted. 


friends in a delightful cocktail ses¬ 
sion. Then we moved on to the 
Woodbridge Country Club where Jos 
Forman had arranged an elegant 
dinner for us. 

“The attendance was small but 
the memories and the fellowship 
were warm and full. We all hope 
that we can have a better turnout 
when our 35th reunion rolls around.” 

1944 

The class of 1944 held its 25th re¬ 
union in May. A very full report of 
the weekend, excerpted here, came 
from EDITH JURKA, class secretary: 
“As far as I am concerned, this was 
the nicest reunion we have had ... It 
was most fascinating and heart¬ 
warming to see people again, some 
for the first time in 25 years . . . For 
the class dinner on Saturday evening 
we had our own large room at the 
Stratford Motor Inn, with six large 
tables in an Elizabethan atmosphere. 
There was much table-hopping, and 
we did not break up until after mid¬ 
night . . .” Present were: ED and Shir¬ 
ley CONWAY, GEORGE and Cavvy 


32 










CORCORAN, FRANK and Betty 
COUNTRYMAN, LARRY and Made¬ 
leine CROWLEY, JOHN and Flor¬ 
ence DOF1ERTY, BOB and Jane 
FRELICK, CAROL and Jolene GOLD- 
ENTHAL, CHARLES and Jane 
HALL, EDITH JURKA, JERRY and 

| Shirley KAYE, TEX MacKENZIE 
PICOU, ELIE and Harriet MARSH, 
KATHERINE HAWLEY and Willard 
MARTIN, JOE and Mildred MAS- 
SARO, PAUL and Ann MOLUMPHY, 

; RUSS and Lillian MONROE, LARRY 
and Polly PICKETT, LARRY and 
Catherine ROTH, JOE and Connie 
SPELMAN and NICK SPINELLI. 
1945 

RICHARD M. PETERS, professor of 
surgery and bioengineering, and 
head of the division of cardiovas¬ 
cular and thoracic surgery at the 
University of California, San Diego, 
School of Medicine, has written a 
book, The Mechanical Basis of Res¬ 
piration: An Approach to Respira¬ 
tory Pathophysiology. Published in 
September by Little, Brown and 
Company, the volume is concerned 
with respiratory function and mal¬ 
function. Dr. Peters covers many as¬ 
pects of respiratory physiology as 
well as respiratory disorders which 
can respond to mechanical manipu¬ 
lation. 

1948 

JOHN B. MORRISON and JULIUS 
LANDWIRTH (’64hs) have opened 
an office at 291 Lambert Road, Or¬ 
ange, Connecticut, for the practice 
of pediatrics and adolescent medi¬ 
cine. 

BENJAMIN F. RUSH has been 
named professor and chairman of 
the Department of Surgery at the 

I 

I 


Dr. Rush 

New Jersey College of Medicine and 
Dentistry in Jersey City. Dr. Rush 
was a research assistant in surgical 
physiology at Sloan-Kettering Insti¬ 
tute on graduation from Yale, and 
later served on the faculty of the 
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. 
Before accepting his present post, he 
was professor of surgery at the Uni¬ 
versity of Kentucky College of Medi¬ 
cine at Lexington. 

1949 

WILLIAM G. ANLYAN has been 
named to the new post of vice presi¬ 
dent for health affairs at Duke Uni¬ 
versity in Durham, North Carolina. 
A professor of surgery, Dr. Anlyan 
will be responsible for the affairs of 
the medical center, including Duke 
Hospital, the schools of medicine 
and nursing, and allied health profes¬ 
sions. He will also be in charge of co¬ 
operative undertakings with five 
area hospitals — Watts, Lincoln, and 
the Veterans Administration Hospi¬ 
tal at Durham; Highland Hospital at 
Asheville; and the Sea Level General 
and Children’s Hospital at Sea Level, 
North Carolina. 



1954 

JOHN A. GARIEPY reported on the 
fifteenth reunion of his class, in the 
absence of JOHN K. ROSE, class sec¬ 
retary, who was in Cambridge, Eng¬ 
land. Returning members, who met 
for dinner at the Park Plaza Hotel, 
included: ARTHUR CROVATTO, 
FRANK L. GRUSKAY, WALKER R. 
HEAP, JR., HERBERT S. HURWITZ, 
ROBERT F. HUSTEAD, LOWELL E. 
OLSEN, ANTHONY V. PICCIRILLO, 
RICHARD D. PULLEN and their 
wives. “On the following afternoon,” 
reports Dr. Gariepy, “the Husteads, 
Pullens, Heaps, Piccirillos, and Grus- 
kays arrived at my house with chil¬ 
dren for a picnic. Bob Hustead ar¬ 
rived from Kansas which gave him 
the long distance record, followed 
by Walker Heap who came from 
Watertown, New York.” 



1955 

JAMES P. NOLAN has been pro¬ 
moted to professor of medicine at 
the State University of New York in 
Buffalo. He has also been appointed 
chief of medicine at the Buffalo Gen¬ 
eral Hospital. Dr. Nolan will continue 
to serve on the staffs of the Edward 
J. Meyer Memorial and Veterans Ad¬ 
ministration Hospitals and will con¬ 
tinue his research in liver disease. 
The Nolans and their four children 
reside at 204 Burbank Drive, Snyder, 
New York. 

1956 

ROSALIE BURNS received the 
Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback 
Award for distinguished teaching at 
the commencement exercises of the 
Woman’s Medical College of Penn¬ 
sylvania in June. She is assistant pro¬ 
fessor of neurology and head of the 



33 









Dr. Burns 

neurology section at that institution. 
JAMES RICHARD PATRICK has 
been appointed chairman of the De¬ 
partment of Pathology at the Medical 
College of Ohio and has also been 
named professor of pediatrics. Most 
recently, he had been chief of pathol¬ 
ogy and director of laboratories at 
Children’s Hospital in Washington, 
D.C. and assistant professor of pa¬ 
thology at Georgetown University. 
1958 

ANDREW McGOWAN, JR. was 
named Chief of Urological Service at 
St. Vincent’s Hospital in New York. 
After leaving medical school, he 
served an internship at the Univer¬ 
sity of Virginia Hospital in Char¬ 
lottesville and a residency in general 
surgery at St. Vincent's Hospital, fol¬ 
lowed by three years of urology at 
King's County Hospital, Downstate 
Medical Center in Brooklyn. From 
1963 to 1965 he was in military ser¬ 
vice as assistant chief of urological 
services at Andrews Air Force Base 
Hospital in Washington, D.C. Dr. Mc¬ 
Gowan returned to the urological 


Dr. McGowan 


service at St. Vincent’s Hospital in 
1964 and in 1966 was also named 
clinical instructor in urology at the 
State University of New York Down- 
state Medical Center. 

1959 

ASA BARNES, JR., class secretary, 
reported on the class reunion: "The 
ten-year reunion of the Class of ’59 
began with coffee and crumpets in 
the Beaumont Room. Conversational 
clusters formed rapidly and subjects 
discussed ranged from current re¬ 
search to the most recent baby 
count. The latter was being increased 
that very day by Mrs. MARTIN 
COLODZIN and Mrs. DAVID SKIN¬ 
NER. Marty managed to alternate 
between the labor room and reunion 
activities but Baltimore was a bit far 
for Dave. 

"The surgeons departed for their 
Grand Rounds and others for a shop¬ 
ping tour of J. Press and the Co-op 
while the talk over the coffee cups 
continued until almost noon. At the 
lunch buffet in Harkness ’59ers 
pushed together a string of tables 
that stretched the width of the room 
. . . There was reluctance to adjourn 
even temporarily but most attended 
the session in the new auditorium to 
hear comments by Dean Redlich and 
President Brewster. 

"The culmination of the reunion 
was perhaps the cocktail hour fol¬ 
lowed by dinner at the Rotisserie 
Normande . . . PARRY and Rae LAR¬ 
SEN from Miami were acknowledged 
distance champs for the evening. 
NICK PASSARELLI had arranged a 
superb repast. . . After brandy, the 
party, almost intact, moved to the 
Villa Passarelli and there continued 
far into the night. As the hour grew 
distinctly late, there was a palpable 
reluctance to disperse. But when the 
inevitable moment came, most of us 
left thinking that ten years is not 
such a long time after all.” In atten¬ 
dance in addition to those mentioned 
above were: CAROL and RICHARD 
AMICK, EDWIN CLAYTON, ROB¬ 
ERT FISHER, ROBERT GONYEA, 
GERALD GORDON, LEONARD 
INKER, WILLIAM JABLONSKI, 
KRISTAPS KEGGI, RAYMOND 
MARK, JOHN MARSH, PETER 
MOLLOY, JOHN POGLINCO, SAN¬ 



FORD SOLOMON, LISA STEINER, 
and MURIEL DuBROW Wolf. 



1962 

NORMAN H. BASS was one of 25 
medical scientists to be appointed a 
Markle Scholar in Academic Medi¬ 
cine for the period 1969-1974. Dr. 
Bass, who is an assistant professor 
at the University of Virginia School 
of Medicine in Charlottesville, will 
be aided by the scholarship in con¬ 
tinuing his research and teaching in 
neurology. 

1964 

To celebrate their fifth year out, the 
class of '64 met at Mory’s for dinner 
with seventeen alumni and many of 
their wives in attendance. Present 
were: the JOSEPH CURIs, the 
PETER GROSSES, the REMO FA- 
BRIs, the STANLEY ROSENBERGs, 
the SIGRID TISHLERs, the DON¬ 
ALD SKINNERs, and Drs. LAW¬ 
RENCE HORWITZ, WILLIAM 
MATCHETT, GENE HIGASHI, 
JOHN BARCHILON, MICHAEL' 
FLYNN, RICHARD LINBURG, ROB¬ 
ERT LYONS, LEWIS LANDSBERG, 
MILLARD AMDUR, ANTHONY 
FERRANTE, and ROBERT SHEL¬ 
TON. Gaiety and nostalgia flowed in 
equal parts until 3 a.m. The reunion 
was pronounced by all present to be 
a success. 

1965 

We have received an announcement 
of the marriage of PHYLLIS J. HUR- 
WITZ to Ilan J. Duvdevani on Aug- 
gust 17th in Binghamton, New York. 
Dr. Dudevani served her internship 


34 












; 


at Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center 
and her residency in internal medi¬ 
cine at the Manhattan Veterans Ad¬ 
ministration Hospital. She is current¬ 
ly a fellow in hematology at Mt. 
Sinai Hospital in New York. Her hus¬ 
band, a chemical engineer, did his 
undergraduate work at Technion in 
Haifa, Israel, and received his mas¬ 
ter’s and Ph.D. degrees in chemical 
engineering from Stevens Institute 
of Technology in Hoboken, New 
Jersey. 

PUBLIC HEALTH 

1921 

IRA VAUGHAN HISCOCK was 
honored this June by the dedication 
of a new building in his name. The 
Connecticut State Welfare Depart¬ 
ment held a ceremony at the opening 
of Hiscock Hall, its new facility for 
the care of disadvantaged children, 
in appreciation of Dr. Hiscock’s long¬ 
standing devotion to public health 
causes. 

1941 

HELEN MARTIKAINEN was one of 
four women to receive honorary de¬ 
grees at the 91st commencement of 
Smith College, Northampton, Massa¬ 
chusetts, in June. Miss Martikainen 
has been chief of health education of 
the World Health Organization in 
Geneva, Switzerland, since 1949. Her 
post has necessitated visiting coun¬ 
tries throughout the world to assist 
in activities involving health educa¬ 
tion. She has received a number of 
other awards including an honorary 
doctorate of science from Bates Col- 
j lege in Lewiston, Maine. After Miss 
Martikainen received her M.P.H. 
from Yale, she joined the U.S. De¬ 


partment of Health, Education, and 
Welfare as health education consul¬ 
tant for seven years. Her citation as 
Doctor of Science reads: “One of the 
critical areas in our race between 
catastrophy and control over the 
world we live in is public health, and 
the task of public health is supreme¬ 
ly educational as you have shown 
for twenty years as Chief of Health 
Education with the World Health 
Organization. To bring health knowl¬ 
edge to the people of eighty coun¬ 
tries from western North Carolina to 
the Pacific has been your mission. To 
succeed, your tact had to match your 
wisdom, your humility inform your 
diligence, and your integrity shine 
through your compassion. Smith 
College is founded in the belief that 
all education is for the good of man 
and has taught that a healthy body 
and a healthy mind are inseparable. 
Since your life has been dedicated to 
prove this last point it is high time 
we joined forces.” 

1945 

ANN WILSON Haynes has returned 
from New Delhi, where she was as¬ 
sociated with the Ford Foundation, 
and is now living at 169 Ardmore, 
Berkeley, California 94707. 

1955 

NGUYEN VAN THO, Minister of 
Culture, Education and Youth of the 
Republic of South Viet Nam, spent 
two days in New Haven during his 
tour of the United States as a mem¬ 
ber of the Viet Nam Council on For¬ 
eign Relations. Purpose of the Coun¬ 
cil is to promote and develop inter¬ 
national understanding and knowl¬ 
edge about the Republic of Viet 

Dr. Van Tho and his wife 


J 

i 


( 


l 


Miss 

Martikainen 




Nam. While in New Haven, Dr. Van 
Tho was the guest of Dr. Ira V. 
Hiscock. 

1957 

SYLVIA ROSS Talbot has been ap¬ 
pointed Minister of Health in Guy¬ 
ana. Dr. Talbot, who is married to 
the Reverend Fred Talbot, was born 
in St. Croix and holds both Amer¬ 
ican and Guyanese citizenship. She 
attended the Inter-American Uni¬ 
versity of Puerto Rico where she 
majored in biology. At the time she 
received her M.S. in Public Health 
from Yale, her husband graduated 
from the Yale Divinity School. Sub¬ 
sequently she obtained the Ph.D. 
degree from Columbia University. 
When she first went to Guyana in 
1961, she taught biology at Bishops 
High School. From 1962 until 1966 
when she left to work on her doc¬ 
torate, she was Health Education 
Officer at the Ministry of Health. 



Dr. Talbot 

Her aim for those who have any¬ 
thing to do with the health of the 
people is to hold discussions center¬ 
ing on problems of health as the 
various people see them and as to 
how they think the problems can be 
solved. She feels strongly about Ca¬ 
ribbean unity that “There needs to 
be more regional cooperation in the 
fields of training, medical facilities 
and the exchange of ideas ... To 
say that I have an enormous task 
ahead is to make an understatement 
for everyone considers the Ministry 
of Health the most difficult . . . 
Nevertheless, I am full of ideas and 
I am certain that with God’s help I 


35 











can effect improvements and cause 
a dynamic and creative health ser¬ 
vice to emerge in this nation.” Peo¬ 
ple have begun to create little jokes 
and quips about the two ministers. 
Says a friend, “Sylvia is the Minis¬ 
ter of the here. Fred is the Minister 
of the hereafter.” 

1958 

}. PHILIP KEEVE has joined the 
United States Agency for Internation¬ 
al Development in the Philippines. 
He has left his post at the Univer¬ 
sity of Pittsburgh School of Medi¬ 
cine to take charge of a major 
program activity of the Health Divi¬ 
sion involving problems relating to 
population, family planning, train¬ 
ing and research. He will also as¬ 
sume overall responsibility for the 
administration of the health pro¬ 
grams of USAID/Philippines. His 
address is: c/o USAID, Philippines, 
APO San Francisco 96528. 

1959 

HENRY M. PARRISH has been ap¬ 
pointed associate dean and profes¬ 
sor of community medicine at the 
University of South Dakota .at Ver¬ 
million, South Dakota. Dr. Parrish 
was formerly professor of commu¬ 
nity health and medical practice at 
the University of Missouri, Colum¬ 
bia, Missouri. 

MAX P. PEPPER, formerly on the 
faculty of the Yale School of Medi¬ 
cine, has joined the faculty of St. 
Louis University School of Medi¬ 
cine in St. Louis, Missouri, as pro¬ 


fessor and chairman, Department of 
Community Medicine. 

1961 

EDWARD A. JANASZ, who was 
most recently at the Park City Hos¬ 
pital in Bridgeport, Connecticut, has 
been named assistant administrator 
at St. Joseph's Hospital, Providence, 
Rhode Island. 

1964 

ESTELLE SIKER Bernstein has been 
appointed director, Community 
Health Division of the Connecticut 
Department of Health in Hartford. 
Before coming to Yale for her 
M.P.H., she had received her M.D. 
degree at Woman’s Medical College 
of Pennsylvania in 1953. 

1967 

SHERWIN MELLINS has been ap¬ 
pointed chief, Maternal and Child 
Health Section, Community Health 
Division for the Connecticut De¬ 
partment of Health in Hartford. Dr. 
Mellins, who was awarded his M.D. 
degree from New York University 
School of Medicine in 1959, lives at 
46 Mountain View Drive in West 
Hartford. 

DENNIS J. MAGID has been ap¬ 
pointed assistant director of the 
Hebrew Rehabilitation Center for 
Aged in Boston, a geriatric teaching 
unit for Boston University School of 
Social Work and for the Harvard 
Medical School. 


HOUSE STAFF 

1964 

RAYMOND K. BOPP has joined the 
Windham Surgical Group, 150 Mans¬ 
field Avenue, Willimantic, Connec¬ 
ticut, in the practice of general, 
thoracic, and cardiovascular sur¬ 
gery. 

1967 

RICHARD DANFORD, a postdoc¬ 
toral fellow in the Department of 
Radiology, received the Memorial 
Award of the Association of Uni¬ 
versity Radiologists in San Fran¬ 
cisco at their annual meeting. This 
award is given each year for out¬ 
standing original research in radiol¬ 
ogy. Dr. Danford’s paper was 
entitled “The Effects of Glucagon 
on Renal Hemodynamics and Renal 
Arteriography.” 

DAVID R. INGRAM, assistant resi¬ 
dent in pediatrics at Yale-New 
Haven Hospital, was the recipient 
of the House Staff Award of the Nu 
Sigma Society, an honorary student 
organization of the Yale medical 
school. The award was established 
last year and will be given annually 
to that member of the house staff 
deemed by students in the clinical 
phase of the curriculum to be their 
outstanding teacher. 

1968 

FRED M. ROSENBLOOM entered 
practice of internal medicine in Mi¬ 
ami Beach, Florida, this fall, having 
served one year on the Yale faculty 
as assistant professor of medicine 
and pediatrics. 


Picture Credits Kate Swift: cover, pp. 9, 10, 11, 14, 17 (left), 18, 27; Harry Asadoorian: pp. 2, 5. 6; A. Burton Street: pp. 7, 8. 20. 21; Charles Alburtus, 
Yale News Bureau: pp. 13. 24, 25, 26, 31; Foto Simonis: p. 22; New Haven Register p. 17 (right); Fabian Bachrach: p. 33 (bottom); Edmond J. Murray: 
p. 34 (top); Von Behr: p. 34 (bottom). 


36 








Yale Medical School Alumni Fund 
Annual Report/ September 1969 



j 

1 

i 


37 








This year, for the first time, the Medical School Alumni 
Fund Annual Report is appearing in Yale Medicine. No 
separate report of the fund will be published. 












Yale Medical School Alumni Fund Annual Report / September 1969 


Fund Officers for the 1968-1969 Annual Giving Campaign 

Daniel F. Harvey, '33, Chairman 
Richard W. Breck '45, Vice Chairman for Regions 
Franklin M. Foote ’33, '35 Dr.P.H., Vice Chairman for 
Public Health 

William Druckemiller '39, Parents Chairman 
J. Roswell Gallagher '30, Bequest Chairman 

Former Medical School Alumni Fund Chairmen 

Charles A. Breck '30 1952-1959 (Deceased) 

Russell B. Scobie '29 1959-1963 
Conrad R. Lam '32 1963-1966 


Campaign Results July 1, 1968 — June 30,1969 

Total amount received 

$76,852 

Alumni 

$66,067 

Parents 

$ 8,219 

AMA-ERF 

$ 2,566 

Number of contributors 

1,987 

Alumni 

1,918 

Parents 

50 

AMA-ERF 

19 

Per cent of participation 

68.5% 


39 




T he response of the Alumni in contributing to the 
Medical School Alumni Fund during the past cam¬ 
paign is most gratifying and remarkable. In Annual 
Giving the total increased by $9,131 over last year. We 
did lose some few contributors but the average gift 
increased to $38.41. 

The largest amount was raised by the Class of 1929, 
(Paul F. McAlenney, M.D., Class Agent.) The classes of 
1901-04 attained the highest percentage of participa¬ 
tion, 100 percent. 

In the regional category, New Haven, 1903-1919 
(Charles W. Gaylord, M.D., Regional Chairman), New 
Haven, 1930-1939 (Paul H. Lavietes, M.D.), and New 
Jersey 1958-1968 (Joseph J. Cillo, M.D.) achieved 100 per 
cent. Parents have contributed the remarkable sum of 
$8,219 (William Druckemiller, M.D., Chairman). 

I wish to thank personally all the Class Agents and 
Dr. Richard W. Breck, Vice Chairman of Regions, and 
his team of Regional Chairmen for their splendid 
efforts and cooperation. 

Again I wish to express my appreciation of the guid¬ 
ance given us by Associate Dean Arthur Ebbert, Jr., 
and our Fund Director Richard G. Jordan. I am most 
grateful to them. 

Above all, my thanks to the contributors who re¬ 
sponded so generously to our requests for gifts in 1968- 
1969. We look forward to the support of all the Alumni 
in 1969-1970 as we strive to respond to the needs of 
the School with increased gifts from more Alumni. 

Daniel F. Harvey '33 
Chairman 1968-69 


ach one of us who has had a chance to acknowledge 
his debt to Yale has welcomed an opportunity to 
express that gratitude. In my own case, the opportunity 
to help increase the participation and size of the An¬ 
nual Giving is particularly welcome. My contact with 
the educational world has driven home for me the im¬ 
portance to any educational institution of the very rare 
“fund without strings” which the dean and faculty can 
count on to make the vital difference between adequacy 
and excellence. I approach the task with humility, and 
hope that all of you will help me in making the Alumni 
Fund constitute a significant factor in the success of ! 
Yale. 

Myron E. Wegman '32 
Chairman 1969-70 



40 








Results of 1968-1969 Campaign July 1, 1968—June 30, 1969 






Endowment 





Contributors 


Parents 




No. of 

including 

Per Cent 

Total by 

and 

AMA-ERF 

Grand 

Year 

Alumni 

AMA-ERF 

of Part. 

Class Misc. 

Gifts 

T otal 

1968-69 

2,801 

1,937 

68.5% 

$60,394 $13,892 

$2,566 

$76,852 



Annual Results Since Incepti 

on of Medical School Fund 



1967-68 

2,744 

1,972 

70.0% 

$55,453 $9,702 

$2,932 

$68,087 

1966-67 

2,666 

1,822 

68.3% 

$50,946 $2,576 

$2,378 

$55,900 

1965-66 

2,618 

1,770 

67.6% 

$47,947 $9,602 

$3,524 

$61,073 

1964-65 

2,566 

1,709 

66.6% 

$45,762 $ 

245 

$4,066 

$50,073 

1963-64 

2,544 

1,635 

64.3% 

$43,175 $ 

6 

$3,500 

$46,681 

1962-63 

2,481 

1,614 

65.0% 

$45,968 $ 

73 

$4,273 

$50,314 

1961-62 

2,422 

1,527 

63.0% 

$35,475 $ 

4 

$3,804 

$39,283 

1960-61 

2,347 

1,503 

64.0% 

$35,386 $ 

35 

$2,510 

$37,932 

1959-60 

2,310 

1,298 

56.2% 

$29,707 


$3,086 

$32,793 

1958-59 

2,270 

1,220 

53.7% 

$26,576 $ 

103 

$3,384 

$30,064 

1957-58 

2,214 

1,175 

52.9% 

$24,515 $ 

175 

$2,476 

$27,166 

1956-57 

2,086 

1,031 

49.0% 

$21,859 $ 

52 

$2,069 

$23,980 

1955-56 

2,046 

886 

43.0% 

$19,995 $ 

325 

$2,605 

$22,925 

1954-55 

2,123 

711 

33.0% 

$16,562 


$4,901 

$21,463 

1953-54 

2,061 

598 

29.0 % 

$15,274 



$15,274 

1952-53 

2,007 

426 

21.0 % 

$11,798 



$11,798 

1951-52 

1,950 

402 

21.0% 

$ 9,876 



$ 9,876 


Leading Classes 





Class 

Agent 

Amount 

Class 

Agent 

Per Cent of 
Participation 

1929 

Paul McAlenney 

$6,294 

1901-1904 

Charles E. Farr 

100% 

1946 

Julian A. Sachs 

$2,285 

1954 

John K. Rose 

83% 

1956 

John H. Gardner III 

$2,231 

1947 

Ellis J. Van Slyck 

82% 

1953 

Vincent Lynn Gott 

$2,205 

1957 

Howard Alyn Minners 

80% 

1944 

Nicholas P. R. Spinelli 

$2,135 

1944 

Nicholas P. R. Spinelli 

79% 

1936 

Hannibal Hamlin 

$2,070 

1959 

Lincoln T. Potter 

77% 

1932 

Myron E. Wegman 

$2,035 





Leading Regions 


Region 

Chairman 

Participation 

New Haven 1903-1919 

Charles W. Gaylord '15 


100% 

New Haven 1930-1939 

Paul H. Lavietes '30 


100% 

New Jersey 1958-1968 

Joseph J. Cillo '58 


100% 

Hartford 1953-1968 

William B. Lehmann '63 


90 % 

New Haven 1940-1949 

Charles B. Cheney '41 


90 % 

New York City 1964-1965 

Frank J. Grady '65 

No. in 

90 % 

Region 

Chairman 

Region 

Amount 

New York City 1927-1933 

Henry Fineberg '27 

25 

$6,866 

Southern California 

Paul L. Saffo '33 

102 

$3,121 

N. & S. Carolina, Georgia 

Mark McD. Lindsey '45 

61 

$2,150 

Northern California 

Henry B. Bruyn '43 

83 

$2,086 

Philadelphia 

Elihu Friedman '42 

53 

$1,840 


Increase in Participation 


Region 

Chairman 

1968-69 


1967-68 

New Haven 1903-1919 

Charles W. Gaylord '15 

100% 

+ 36 pts. 

64% 

Kansas & Oklahoma 

Robert F. Hustead '54 

80% 

+ 24 pts. 

56% 

Texas 

O. Roger Hollan '45 

83% 

+ 19 pts. 

64% 

Colorado 

Berkeley L. Rich '63 

46% 

+ 17 pts. 

29% 

Washington State 

John H. Hodge '55 

83% 

+ 16 pts. 

67% 


41 


















Comparison by Classes 




Per Cent of 



Contributors 


Total 



Participation 

No. in 

Dir. to 

thru 


Amount to 

Class 

Class Agent 

68-69 

67-68 

Class 

Yale 

AMA 

Total 

Yale 

1891-1904 

Charles E. Farr 

100% 

43% 

2 

2 

— 

2 

$ 335 

1905-06 

Charles C. Murphy 

43% 

44% 

7 

3 

— 

3 

150 

1907-08 

Anthony J. Mendillo 

36% 

33% 

11 

4 

— 

4 

375 

1909-10 

F. Elmer Johnson 

40% 

36% 

10 

4 

— 

4 

130 

1911-14 

Maxwell Lear 

38% 

46% 

26 

10 

— 

10 

175 

1915-19 

Clyde Leroy Deming 

56% 

52% 

18 

10 

— 

10 

240 

1920 

David Waskowitz 

38% 

38% 

8 

3 

— 

3 

125 

1921 

Barnett Greenhouse 

56% 

70% 

9 

5 

— 

5 

70 

1922 

Edward T. Wakeman 

53% 

56% 

17 

9 

— 

9 

325 

1923 

George H. Gildersleeve 

50% 

57% 

18 

9 

— 

9 

520 

1924 

Leo F. McAndrews 

71% 

66% 

24 

17 

— 

17 

865 

1925 

Alice A. S. Whittier 

62% 

63% 

34 

21 

— 

21 

749 

1926 

Maxwell Bogin 

56% 

62% 

34 

18 

1 

19 

530 

1927 

M. Dawson Tyson 

63% 

62% 

35 

22 

— 

22 

1,316 

1928 

Thomas J. Danaher 

46% 

48% 

41 

19 

— 

19 

1,822 

1929 

Paul F. McAlenney 

74% 

74% 

43 

31 

1 

32 

6,293 

1930 

J. Edward Flynn 

59% 

60% 

39 

23 

— 

23 

882 

1931 

Michael D’Amico 

60% 

57% 

37 

22 

— 

22 

1,040 

1932 

Myron E. Wegman 

66% 

70% 

38 

23 

2 

25 

2,035 

1933 

Lee E. Farr 

69% 

74% 

35 

24 

— 

24 

1,360 

1934 

Frederick Beck 

58% 

65% 

33 

18 

1 

19 

782 

1935 

James Q. Haralambie 

65% 

66% 

40 

26 

— 

26 

1,469 

1936 

Hannibal Hamlin 

63% 

60% 

46 

28 

1 

29 

2,070 

1937 

Lorande M. Woodruff 

49% 

60% 

47 

20 

3 

23 

737 

1938 

Nelson K. Ordway 

71% 

81% 

31 

22 

— 

22 

1,430 

1939 

Robert G. Ernest 

61% 

63% 

46 

28 

— 

28 

1,231 

1940 

James J. Smith 

66% 

62% 

41 

26 

1 

27 

1,110 

1941 

Horace T. Gardner 

62% 

55% 

47 

28 

1 

29 

2,235 

1942 

Donald D. Dieter 

74% 

69% 

42 

30 

— 

31 

1,410 

1943 (Mar.) 

Gerard Fountain 

70% 

66% 

40 

28 

— 

28 

910 

1943 (Dec.) 

S. Brownlee 

55% 

67% 

49 

23 

4 

27 

898 

1944 

Nicholas P. Spinelli 

79% 

72% 

48 

36 

2 

38 

2,134 

1945 

Richard W. Breck 

71% 

80% 

59 

42 

— 

42 

1,875 

1946 

Julian A. Sachs 

70% 

76% 

57 

40 

— 

40 

2,285 

1947 

Ellis J. VanSlyck 

82% 

85% 

61 

50 

— 

50 

1,705 

1948 

David E. Morton 

70% 

66% 

56 

35 

4 

39 

1,213 

1949 

Paul Goldstein 

69% 

70% 

52 

36 

— 

36 

1,503 

1950 

Archie J. Golden 

75% 

80% 

44 

33 

— 

33 

1,670 

1951 

Goffredo S. Accetta 

70% 

66% 

60 

38 

4 

42 

1,570 

1952 

Harvey L. Young 

70% 

80% 

59 

41 

— 

41 

1,915 

1953 

Vincent Lynn Gott 

75% 

76% 

64 

47 

1 

48 

2,205 

1954 

John K. Rose 

83% 

84% 

60 

50 

— 

50 

1,809 

1955 

Robert A. Kramer 

74% 

79% 

77 

56 

1 

57 

1,900 

1956 

John H. Gardner 

73% 

76% 

73 

53 

— 

53 

2,231 

1957 

Howard Alyn Minners 

80% 

76% 

80 

63 

1 

64 

1,952 

1958 

Charles A. Hall 

75% 

78% 

73 

53 

2 

55 

1,411 

1959 

Lincoln T. Potter 

77% 

70% 

78 

58 

2 

60 

1,327 

1960 

Thomas P. Kugelman 

63% 

61% 

75 

47 

— 

47 

852 

1961 

Jon D. Dorman 

62% 

63% 

73 

45 

— 

45 

695 

1962 

Richard N. Collins 

56% 

67% 

81 

45 

— 

45 

585 

1963 

Alan E. Shapiro 

64% 

65% 

77 

49 

— 

49 

609 

1964 

David Porter Johnson 

73% 

78% 

74 

54 

— 

54 

584 

1965 

David G. Campbell 

70% 

73% 

81 

57 

— 

57 

534 

1966 

Richard J. Howard 

59% 

66% 

76 

45 

— 

45 

294 

1967 

James M. Dowaliby 

72% 

61% 

71 

51 

— 

51 

423 

1968 

Frank E. Lucente 

52% 

— 

82 

43 

— 

43 

328 

Public Health 

Franklin M. Foote (759) 

21% 


161 

161 

1 

162 

2,021 

Totals 


68.5% 

70% 

2,801 

1,884 

34 

1,918 

$68,258 

Miscellaneous 





— 

19 

19 

375 

Parents 





50 

— 

50 

8,219 

Grand Totals 





1,934 

53 

1,987 

$76,852 


42 















Regional Report 


68-69 

67-68 

Region 

Chairman 

No. in 
Region 

No. of 
Contr. 

Amount 

100% 

64% 

New Haven 1903-1919 

Charles W. Gaylord T5 

9 

9 

$ 455 

100% 

100% 

New Haven 1930-1939 

Paul H. Lavietes '30 

21 

21 

635 

100% 

NA 

New Jersey 1958-1968 

Joseph J. Cillo ’58 

27 

27 

357 

90% 

76% 

Hartford 1953-1968 

William B. Lehman '63 

20 

18 

669 

90% 

93% 

New Haven 1940-1949 

Charles B. Cheney '41 

31 

28 

965 

90% 

93% 

New York City 1964-1965 

Frank J. Grady '65 

10 

9 

105 

89% 

100% 

Michigan 

Edward A. Krull, 52 

35 

31 

1,048 

87% 

NA 

Illinois-Indiana 

Frederick J. Fiederlein ’54 

46 

40 

1,542 

84% 

NA 

Lower New York State 1950-1956 

William V. Lewit '56 

31 

26 

945 

83% 

NA 

New Haven 1965-1966 

Margretta Ann Reed Seashore '65 

18 

15 

122 

83% 

64% 

Texas 

O. Roger Hollan ’45 

30 

25 

578 

83% 

67% 

Washington State 

John H. Hodge '55 

40 

33 

1,058 

82% 

91% 

New York City 1903-1926 

D. Anthony D’Esopo '24 

17 

14 

495 

80% 

88% 

Hartford 1928-1936 

Thomas C. Carey ’28 

15 

12 

935 

80% 

79% 

New Haven 1956-1959 

Robert H. Glass '57 

30 

24 

523 

80% 

56% 

Kansas & Oklahoma 

Robert F. Hustead '54 

15 

12 

460 

79% 

NA 

Boston 1945-1959 

Jerome O. Klein '56 

28 

22 

805 

79% 

82% 

Philadelphia 

Elihu Friedmann '42 

53 

42 

1,840 

78% 

70% 

Southern California 

Paul L. Saffo '33 

102 

80 

3,121 

78% 

77% 

New Haven 1920-1929 

Clement F. Batelli ’28 

23 

18 

525 

78% 

NA 

Washington (D.C.) 1924-1957 

Gilbert M. Eisner ’56 

27 

21 

566 

78% 

92% 

New Mexico, Nevada, & Utah 

Norman F. Moon ’56 

27 

21 

703 

77% 

NA 

Washington (D.C.) 1963-1968 

Haskins K. Kashima ’58 

34 

26 

312 

77% 

NA 

Iowa & Wisconsin 

Phillip Couchman '49 

26 

20 

520 

77% 

NA 

New Jersey 1942-1957 

Sanfurd G. Bluestein ’46 

26 

20 

903 

77% 

88% 

New York 1953-1957 

Seth Abramson ’53 

17 

13 

416 

77% 

NA 

Lower New York State 1933-1949 

Leo Kellerman ’42 

22 

17 

1,145 

77% 

78% 

Pittsburgh 

John Beauregard ’39 

17 

13 

515 

76% 

81% 

New York 1944-1952 

Edith M. Jurka ’44 

21 

16 

725 

75% 

76% 

Eastern Connecticut 

Charles Chace ’52 

47 

35 

990 

75% 

71% 

New Haven 1963-1964 

William Matchett ’64 

24 

18 

192 

75% 

NA 

Lower New York State 1957-1958 

Salvatore Falbo ’57 

28 

21 

452 

74% 

64% 

Bridgeport & Norwalk, Conn. 

Max Alpert ’28 

23 

17 

772 

73% 

NA 

Washington, (D.C.) 1958-1962 

Raymond W. Turner ’58 

22 

16 

265 

73% 

70% 

South Central 

Myron J. Adams ’33 

75 

55 

1,494 

72% 

67% 

Northern California 

Henry B. Bruyn ’43 

83 

60 

2,086 

72% 

64% 

New York 1927-1933 

Henry Fineberg ’27 

25 

18 

6.866 

72% 

NA 

New York 1966-1968 

Richard S. Bockman ’67 

18 

13 

108 

70% 

71% 

New Haven 1950-1955 

Andrew S. Wong ’51 

27 

19 

425 

70% 

NA 

New Haven 1967-1968 

Peter N. Herbert ’67 

33 

23 

153 

70% 

NA 

Boston 1919-1944 

Malvin F. White ’39 

27 

19 

910 

70% 

NA 

Boston 1965-1968 

James J. Dineen ’67 

20 

14 

97 

69% 

72% 

North & South Carolina & Georgia 

Mark McD. Lindsey ’45 

61 

42 

2,150 

68% 

NA 

Minnesota 

Jonathan S. Bishop ’49 

41 

28 

800 

68% 

74% 

Virginia & West Virginia 

Joseph F. Kell, Jr., ’43 

38 

26 

764 

67% 

57% 

Hartford 1937-1942 

Theodore W. Steege ’38 

21 

14 

825 

67% 

72% 

Delaware & Maryland 

William J. Vandervort ’53 

76 

51 

1,157 

67% 

64% 

Florida 

Thomas O. Gentsch ’53 

54 

36 

1,739 

67% 

NA 

Boston 1960-1964 

Charles W. Carl ’63 

27 

18 

300 

67% 

72% 

New Hampshire & Vermont 

Edmund L. Piper ’49 

33 

22 

995 

65% 

76% 

Fairfield County, Connecticut 

John B. Ogilvie '34 

31 

20 

1,285 

65% 

91% 

Hartford 1943-1952 

Carol Goldenthal ’44 

23 

15 

475 

65% 

82% 

New Haven 1960-1962 

Frederick P. Anderson ’62 

17 

11 

295 

65% 

73% 

Northwest Connecticut 

Henry N. Blansfield ’47 

46 

30 

855 

65% 

78% 

New York 1934-1943 

John Prutting ’38 

20 

13 

695 

65% 

75% 

New York 1961-1963 

Frank R. Hartman '62 

17 

11 

178 

64% 

NA 

Lower New York State 1906-1936 

Ferdinand G. Kojis ’28 

28 

18 

1,040 

64% 

73% 

Oregon 

William R. Sweetman ’43 

11 

7 

105 

63% 

57% 

Arizona 

John F. Carroll ’56 

27 

17 

553 

63% 

57% 

Ohio 

Robert Youngen '57 

48 

30 

879 

62% 

70% 

Northeast Mass. & Boston Suburbs 

Morgan Sargent ’37 

39 

24 

534 

62% 

62% 

Rhode Island 

Richard R. Dyer ’45 

26 

16 

363 

61% 

62% 

Western Massachusetts 

Frederick A. Post ’36 

38 

23 

960 


43 


68-69 

67-68 

Region 

Chairman 

No. in 
Region 

No. of 
Contr. 

Amount 

61% 

70% 

Upper New York State 

Nicholas Stahl '43 

82 

50 

1,735 

58% 

67% 

New York 1958-1960 

Theodore W. Lieberman '58 

12 

7 

315 

56% 

NA 

San Francisco 

Henry B. Bruyn '43 

82 

46 

871 

55% 

NA 

Montana, Nebraska, Idaho, 

D. Franklin Johnson ’55 

11 

6 

235 

53% 

73% 

N. & S. Dakota, Wyoming 
Southern Mass. & Cape Cod 

Wallace M. Kemp, Jr. '50 

17 

9 

320 

52% 

NA 

New Jersey 1900-1941 

Herbert W. Diefendorf, ’41 

27 

14 

495 

50% 

44% 

Hartford 1906-1927 

Charles I. Solomon ’25 

14 

7 

280 

46% 

29% 

Colorado 

Berkeley L. Rich ’63 

24 

11 

116 

41% 

56% 

Maine 

Francis A. Spellman '43 

27 

11 

625 

72% 

72% 

Vice Chairman for Regions 

Richard W. Breck ’45 

2,287 

1,635 

$59,742 


Contributors/July 1, 1968 — June 30,1969 

Medical Alumni by Classes 
Public Health. Alumni by Classes 
Parents 

* Contributed prior to death 

t Contributed through AMA-ERF only 

* Contributed to Yale Medical School Alumni Fund and 


through AMA-ERF also. 




Medical Alumni 

1916 

1924 

1926 


Lloyd L. Maurer 

Edward Pratt Allen 

Stanton T. Allison 

1903 

Louis H. Nahum 

John J. Batchelor 

Louise Baker 

John H. Bailey 

Raymond M. Schulte 

D. Anthony D’Esopo 

Maxwell Bogin 

Charles E. Farr 

1917 

Stuart O. Foster 

Abe S. Brown 

1905 

Nathaniel C. Robey 

Edward M. Gould 

tThomas Cottiero 

James J. Costanzo 

1919 

Joseph A. Groark 

Sidney I. Franklin 

1906 

Louis E. Blanchard 

Max Horn 

Leonard A. Hallock 

Herbert L. Kennedy 

Michael M. Devenis 

Edward Phillips Levine 

JJoseph L. Hetzel 

Charles C. Murphy 

Willys M. Monroe 

Leo F. McAndrews 

Morris Hinenburg 

1907 

1920 

John McK. Mitchell 

Ben Klotz 

+ Anthony J. Mendillo 

Oscar Brenner 

David M. Raskind 

John Bart Lauricella 

1908 

Lillian L. Nye 

Myron A. Sallick 

Edward J. McCabe 

Abraham Bernstein 

David Waskowitz 

Eli Y. Shorr 

Milton Malev 

John F. O'Brien 

1921 

Morris Slater 

Joseph T. Matteis 

Michael A. Parlato 

Ella W. Calhoun 

Jacques D. Soifer 

Alexander E. Rosenberg 

1909 

Joseph T. Eagan 

Harold T. Vogel 

Richard M. Starr 

* George W. King 

Barnett Greenhouse 

Francis B. Woodford 

Edward J. Thalheimer 

1910 

Arthur S. Griswold 

1925 

Leonard Paul Wershub 

George Goldman 

Julian B. Herrmann 

Spafford Ackerly 

C. Eugene Woodruff 

F. Elmer Johnson 

1922 

Jean H. Celentano 

1927 

Thomas H. Russell 

Maurice Grozin 

Dorence S. Cowles 

Louis J. Baronberg 

1911 

Benedict R. Harris 

Edward A. Cramton 

Wallace R. Bostwick 

Lewis S. Booth 

Jesse S. Harris 

Waldo F. Desmond 

Henry Caplan 

Genesis F. Carelli 

Chester E. Hurwitz 

Henry W. Ferris 

George L. Daniels 

Maxwell Lear 

Helen P. Langer 

Thomas Francis, Jr. 

Leo Elson 

1912 

Perley J. Mundie 

Anna J. Gosline 

Henry Irwin Fineberg 

Daniel T. Banks 

Maurice F. O’Connell 

William E. Hall 

Harold A. Flynn 

Milton L. Dryfus 

Henry B. Rollins 

Ives Hendrick 

Meyer Friedenson 

Harry Fried 

Edward T. Wakeman 

Joseph Petrelli 

Donald F. Gibson 

Joseph E. J. Harris 

1923 

Thomas R. Preston 

Herman H. Goldstein 

Edward H. Kirschbaum 

Frank G. Amatruda 

Samuel Reback 

Edward E. Harkavy 

William H. J. O'Brien 

William Cohen 

Theodore Robie 

Albert Jablonsky 

Walter Clark Tilden 

Robert K. Cutter 

Charles I. Solomon 

Nathan Levy 

1913 

George H. Gildersleeve 

Welles A. Standish 

William G. Meredith 

Ralph E. Taylor 

Joseph A.Johnston 

Morton J. Tendler 

Frank Mongillo 

1915 

Jacob Mellion 

Alice A. S. Whittier 

Daniel G. Morton 

Harry L. Berman 

Julius A. Olean 

Gonsalvo C. Williams, Jr. 

William A. Petruzzi 

Clyde Leroy Deming 

Saul Schapiro 

E. Christopher Wood 

Arthur E. T. Rogers 

Charles W. Gaylord 

Hyman W. Weinstein 

tHoward A. Wood 

Frank A. Seibert 


44 













M. Dawson Tyson 
James S. VanLeuvan 
George H. Zinn 

1928 

Max Alpert 
Clement F. Batelli 
Bernard S. Brody 
John Burke 
Thomas C. Carey 
Charles S. Culotta 
Edwin B. Egli 
Edward L. Howes 
Sheldon A. Jacobson 
Ferdinand G. Kojis 
R. Harold Lockhart 
Mary B. H. Michal 
Daniel A. Mulvihill 
Harry C. Oard 
Clarence E. Reyner 
Nathan E. Ross 
Robert I. Rubenstein 
Lewis A. Scheuer 
George C. Wilson 

1929 

James Rae Arneill, Jr. 
tjohn M. Bailey 
John W. Cass, Jr. 

Morris A. Cohn 
Frank H. D’Andrea 
Charles J. Epstein 
Caldwell B. Esselstyn 
Robert A. Frisch 
Olive Gates 
George S. Goldman 
Alexander O. Haff 
John A. Hangen 
Harold J. Harris 
George P. Jackson, Jr. 
Victor H. Kugel 
Joseph Lander 
Louis Lichtenstein 
Vernon W. Lippard 
Paul F. McAlenney 
Jacob Nodelman 
Tony Liebman Rakieten 
Clarence L. Robbins 
William F. Roth, Jr. 

Russell B. Scobie 
Benjamin Spock 
Robert Tennant 
Felix F. Tomaino 
{F. Erwin Tracy 
Newell R. Washburn 
Julius G. Weiner 
Amano Fumiko Yamaguchi 
Herman Yannet 

1930 

Samuel Alpert 
Ignacio Bird-Acosta 
Courtney Craig Bishop 
Caspar G. Burn 
Frank H. Couch 
Robert D. M. Cunningham 
Knox H. Finley 
J. Edward Flynn 
J. Roswell Gallagher 
Leonard Greenburg 
James C. Hart 
Irving L. Josephs 
David Kalkstein 
Israel E. Kirsh 
Edmund L. Kitzmeyer 


Morris Y. Krosnick 
Paul H. Lavietes 
Jack Lehner 
Moses D. Lischner 
Milton T. McDonald 
Howard Millstein 
Harold A. Rosenburg 
J Paul Watson 
Mrs. Frederick G. Wilson 

1931 

Dana L. Blanchard 
Henry H. Briggs 
Joseph F. Burke 
Earl R. Carlson 
Benjamin Castleman 
Michael D’Amico 
Richard L. Frank 
Helen R. Gilmore 
Theodore F. Hahn 
Paul A. Harper 
Harold E. Harrison 
Morris F. Heller 
Thomas C. Jaleski 
Yale David Koskoff 
A. Phillip La France 
Rhoda M. Mickey 
Nelson Newmark 
Sheldon Payne 
Morris L. Rakieten 
Abraham J. Schechter 
Max Taffel 
A. Allison Wills, Jr. 

1932 

Louis K. Alpert 
Sherman J. Beers 
Leonard F. Ciner 
Henry Brill 
Frank D. Carroll 
Clement C. Clarke 
Clarence H. Cole 
Hester B. Curtis 
Gideon K. deForest 
Joseph P. Donnelly 
Thomas E. Farthing 
Lewis F. Foster 
Edward W. Holland 
Storer Plumer Humphreys 
Conrad R. Lam 

tjohn C. Leonard in memoriam 
Mario L. Palmieri 
Arthur J. Present 
Elizabeth M. Ramsey 
Rudolph E. Vandeveer 
Myron E. Wegman 
Roland T. Wehger 

tCarl H. Wies 
Frank B. Wisner 
Edward H. Wray, Jr. 

Edmund A. Zybulewski 

1933 

Myron J. Adams 
Donald G. Barton 
Fred W. Buse 
Caroline A. Chandler 
Lee E. Farr 
Robert L. Feldmann 
William F. Flynn 
Franklin M. Foote 
Irving Friedman 
Jack Greenberg 

{Daniel F. Harvey 
George K. Hirst 


Robert E. Kaufman 
Joseph Mignone 
Raymond E. Miller 
Ashley Pond, III 
Paul L. Saffo 
Edwin B. Seelye 
Lester Q. Stewart 
Sydney W. Stringer 
Frederick A. Wies 
John J. Wolfe 
Francis M. Woods 

1934 

Leona Baumgartner 
Frederick Beck 
James F. Blades 
Joseph Budnitz 
{DeWitt Dominick 
Sylvia A. Ficke 
tFrancis P. Guida 
Thomas V. Hynes 
Derick A. January 
Kalmen A. Klinghoffer 
Knowles B. Lawrence 
Frank L. Marting 
Theodore P. Merrick 
Herbert C. Miller 
John B. Ogilvie 
{Lucien M. Pascucci 
Harry Sherman 
William R. Willard 
George Zalkan 

1935 

Walter E. Barney 
George A. Carden, Jr. 
Edward V. Carvey 
Maurice A. de Harne 
Bernard S. Dignam 
Edward F. Falsey 
Sawnie R. Gaston 
H. Hoffman Groskloss 
Lena Halpern 
James Quintin Haralambie 
Henry L. Hartman 
W. Howard Horner 
{Mildred H. January 
Samuel D. Kushlan 
{James B. Lounsbury 
Max Miller 
Norman P. Rindge 
Milton Rose 
Viva Schatia 
Ralph F. Sikes 
Louis E. Silcox 
Jack C. Sleath 
Walter A. L. Thompson 
Paul H. Twaddle 
Samuel Zelman 

1936 

William S. Baum 
Daniel Bergsma 
George Henderson Brown 
Lester W. Burket 
John J. Clancy 
Nicholas D. D’Esopo 
J Albert W. Diddle 
Harold Genvert 
Margaret C. L. Gildea 
Milton S. Godfried 
{George D. Gross 
George A. Hahn 
Hannibal Hamlin 
Louise G. Hutchins 


Frank F. Kanthak 
E. Robbins Kimball 
Philip M. LeCompte 
Donald F. Marshall 
Stephen F. Nagyfy 
Frederick A. Post 
Jerome Ritter 
Hugh Allan Smith 
Margaret Sommers 
Robert H. Stevens 
Morris Tager 
Mary M. Troll 
{Edgar W. Warren 
Samuel Yochelson 

1937 

tEdmund R. Blower 
Lewis H. Bronson, Jr. 
fClair B. Crampton 
Allan B. Crunden, Jr. 
Margaret Dann 
Guido A. DeBlasio 
tDavid A. Dolowitz 
D. Crosby Greene 
Bernhard H. Hartman 
{Benjamin F. Hoopes 
Robert C. Horn, Jr. 
Wilbur D. Johnston 
Alfred E. King 
Dunham Kirkham 
Julia Mehlman 
James P. Morrill 
Charles W. Neuhardt 
Alan A. Rosen 
Morgan Sargent 
Edward J. Shaw 
Albert D. Spicer 
Levin Lyttleton Waters 
{William M. Wiepert 
Lucille R. Wiepert 

1938 

Roy N. Barnett 
Joseph A. Bliss 
Henry L. Carideo 
Roberta Crutcher 
John A. Dillon 
S. Charles Kasdon 
Benjamin E. Lyons 
John J. McGillicuddy 
Edward Nichols 
Nelson K. Ordway 
Charles Petrillo 
Edward W. Pinkham, Jr. 
John Pruning 
James Radcliffe, Jr. 
Arthur S. Reynolds 
George E. Roberge 
Norman Ruud 
Theodore W. Steege 
Lester J. Wallman 
N. William Wawro 
Louis G. Welt 
Richard V. Worthington 

1939 

John F. Beauregard 
Stephen W. Collins, Jr. 
Harold H. Coppersmith 
Norman L. Cressy 
Albert W. Dautrich 
William H. Druckemiller 
Joseph B. Forman 
S. Jerome Greenfield 
John James Head 


Nathaniel Kenigsberg 
Arthur E. Laidlaw 
Margaret A. Lennox 

♦ Ward J. McFarland 
James Peter Murphy 
Russell Nahigian 
Russell C. Norton 
Douglas S. Riggs 
Roger N. Ryley 
Ernest L. Sarason 
Bradford Simmons 
Rebecca Z. Solomon 
Stuart S. Stevenson 
John D. Tobin 
Arthur S. Tucker 
Darrell G. Voorhees 

♦ Douglass W. Walker 
John H. Wentworth 
Malvin F. White 

1940 

Theodore E. Allen 
Joseph V. Baldwin 
Jack S. Blaisdell 
Philip Brezina 
Crawford J. Campbell 
Thaddeus S. Danowski 
Wynant Dean 
Robert M. Dunlap 
James F. Ferguson, Jr. 
John C. Haley 
Henry D. Humphrey 
H. Stuart Irons, Jr. 
Donald G. Johnson 
Paul D. MacLean 
Edward Martin 

tK. Alvin A. Merendino 
William R. Oakes 
Maurice Ross 
Lee S. Sannella 
Beatrix Goldzieher Smith 
Edward R. Smith 
James J. P. Smith 
Joseph E. Sokal 
Francis X. Sommer 
J. Champneys Taylor 
Patricia E. Wanning 
John B. Wells 
Helen H. Woods 

1941 

Sophia C. Alway 
Robert H. Areson 

tPaul H. Barbour 
W. Randal Bell 
Marvin Blum 
Joseph P. Carson, Jr. 

+ Charles B. Cheney 
Herbert W. Diefendorf 
Robert F. Dine 
John E. Fenton 
Lloyd D. Flint 
John Franklin 
Horace T. Gardner 
Robert L. Gilbert 
Frederick P. Gilke 
George James 
Sidney L. Lasell 
William Lee 
Bjorn Lih 

John R. McDermott 
Willys M. Monroe 
Malcolm C. Murfitt 
Edward B. O'Connell 


♦ Robert W. Ollayos 
Gioacchino S. Parrella 
David V. Pecora 

♦ Leslie Simmonds 
Janet H. VanOrden 
Irving Waltman 

1942 

William E. Bloomer 

♦ James M. Bunce 
Walter J. Burdette 
Donald S. Childs, Jr. 
Ludmil A. Chotkowski 
Vincent J. Collins 
David G. Decker 
Eugene M. de Hostos 
Hendrik DeKruif 
Donald D. Dieter 
Davitt Felder 

Elihu Friedmann 
Allan V. N. Goodyer 
William Harrison, Jr. 
Leo Kellerman 
John R. Lincoln 
fRobert A. Mino 

♦ Patrick S. Mullins 
Dean Nichols 
Michael A. Puzak 
Samuel Ritvo 
Joseph Seronde, Jr. 
Richmond W. Smith, Jr. 
Carter Stilson 
Jackson H. Stuckey 
Edgar B. Taft 
Maurice Tulin 

Philip Viscidi 
Arthur A. Ward, Jr. 
Irving Norman Wolfson 
Raymond J. Zagraniski 

1943 March 
Ralph D. Alley 

♦ Lycurgus M. Davey 
Charles V. E. Dowling 
Jessamine R. Goerner 
Gerard Fountain 

R. Leonard Kemler 
Joseph P. Kriss 
Jonathan T. Lanman 
J. Philip Loge 
Henry E. Markley 
Waiter J. Nero 
Dorothea R. Peck 
Edward F. Rabe 
Earl J. Rhoades 

♦ Henry A. Riedel 
Bernard R. Rowen 
Marcus E. Sanford 
Edward Hersey Soule 
Nicholas M. Stahl 
Robert Lee Taylor 
John J. Weber 
Morris A. Wessel 

♦ Robert H. Wyatt 
1943 December 
Richard N. Abbott 

$John R. Almklov 
Ray C. Bitterlich 
David G. Borden 
tjames L. Bradley 
Robert F. Bradley 

S. Brownlee Brinkley 
Henry Bruyn, Jr. 
Thomas L. Bucky 


Philip B. Chase 
Hunter H. Comly 
tNorman I. Condit 
Thomas D. Cook 
Ronald W. Cooke 
Jean P. Davis 
Robert H. Furman 
tjohn P. Haberlin 

♦ Victor C. Hackney 
Joseph F. Kell, Jr. 

Sawyer E. Medbury 

♦ Hoyt B. Miles, Jr. 

Ira A. Rashkoff 
Ellen F. Regan 

B. Allen Richardson 
Benjamin R. Robinson, Jr. 
Donald W. Seldin 
William R. Sweetman 
Jane C. Symonds 
Wesley C. Watson 
tStanley J. Weigel 
Ross Lionel Wilson 
James T. Wolstenholme 

1944 

Carl E. Andrews 
Edward J. Conway 
George B. Corcoran 

♦ Frank W. Countryman 
Charles H. Crothers 
Lawrence G. Crowley 
John H. Doherty 
Donal L. Dunphy 

fRobert W. Frelick 
Carol Goldenthal 
Charles A. Hall 
Howard B. Hamilton 
Robert I. Hinkley 
fDonald H. Holden 
W. Raymond James 
Ward S. Jenkins 
Edith M. Jurka 
Jerome J. Kaye 
Frederick F. Krauskopf 
Ellen P. MacKenzie 
Elias J. Marsh 
Katherine Hawley Martin 
Nora Harnden Mason 
+ A. Reese Matteson 
Paul E. Molumphy 
Russell R. Monroe 

♦ Lawrence K. Pickett 
Laurence G. Roth 
Haynes W. Sheppard 
Sarah P. Sherwood 
Eugene Smith 
Joseph W. Spelman 
Nicholas P. R. Spinelli 
Anthony J. Stone 
Priscilla Dienes Taft 
Anthony Varjabedian 
Calvin W. Woodruff 
Reuben Zucker 

1945 

tGeorge Howard Allison 
A. John Anlyan 
Albert S. Atwood 
Richard W. Breck 
Carleton J. Brown 
Louise H. Burr 
Alice Shepard Cary 
Sanford F. Cockerell 
Jay B. Cohn 


Thomas P. Cotter 
Edward M. Daniels 
Richard R. Dyer 

♦ Robert S. Easton 
John R. Fenger 
Sidney S. Feuerstein 
John Hine Flynn 

Alice Dershimer Friedman 
Raymond A. Gagliardi 
Philip S. Good 

♦ Gove Hambidge, Jr. 
Herbert S. Harned, Jr. 

Isao Hirata, Jr. 

Paul W. Hoffert 
O. Roger Hollan 

♦ John R. Howick 
Hans R. Huessy 
William L. Jenney 
John H. Killough 
Michael Lau 
William E. Laupus 

♦ Raymond E. Lesser 
Mark McD. Lindsey 
Charles E. McLean 

♦ James R. Mason 
Samuel C. May 
Lawrence J. Morin 
George W. Naumburg, Jr. 
Fitzhugh C. Pannill 
Raymond E. Parks 
George R. Read 

Elliot R. Reiner 
Charles E. Sherwood 
Leroy S. Wolfe 
1946 

Margaret J. Albrink 

♦ Joseph A. Arminio 
William G. Banfield, Jr. 
Franklin C. Behrle 
Aaron T. Beck 
Frederick C. Biehusen 
Sanford G. Bluestein 
Linus W. Cave 
Thomas J. Coleman 
Carl L. Cook, Jr. 

James F. Cooney 
George C. Cusick 
Edward F. Edinger, Jr. 

H. Lambert Filer, Jr. 
Gregory E. Flynn 
Martin E. Gordon 
Kenneth L. Hardy 
James N. Harten 
Charles S. Judd, Jr. 

♦ Harold King 
Benjamin F. Kitchen, Jr. 
James A. Kleeman 
Richard H. Mann 
Thomas J. Mathieu 

Joe D. Morris 
John H. Morton 
John F. Neville, Jr. 

Laura White Neville 
Robert H. Owens 
Vincent Pepe 
Francis G. Reilly 
David H. Riege 
Phillips E. Roth 
Julian A. Sachs 
Gerald B. Shattuck 
Richard G. Sisson 
Robert R. Wagner 


46 










William J. Wedemeyer, Jr. 
Elihu S. Wing, Jr. 

Gerald S. Yudkin 

1947 

George R. Barnes, Jr. 
Alexander H. Beaton 
Henry N. Blansfield 
Albert W. Bostrom 
John E. Bowers 
William Roy Breg, Jr. 
Richard C. Britton 
Rocco A. Calandruccio 
John L. Cannon 
Betty P. Carlin 
M. Richard Carlin 
John C. Carpenter 
Charles R. Cavanagh, Jr. 
Arthur H. Chapman 
Robert A. Chase 
Amoz I. Chernoff 
William F. Collins, Jr. 
Robert P. Darrow 
Archie L. Dean, Jr. 

Jean Hay Dougherty 
Owen W. Doyle 
Franklin Harold Epstein 
Edward Foord 
Richard K. Friedlander 
Frank H. Horton 
Charles M. Karpinski 
Robert J. Kerin 
Don F. Kimmerling 
Richard P. Levy 
Brock Lynch 
{William K. McClelland 
Victor A. Machcinski 
William F. Maniatis 
Robert F. Newton 
Myron K. Nobil 
Lawrence C. Perry 
Philip H. Philbin 
Edgar B. Phillips, II 
Olive E. Pitkin 
{Irving Rudman 
Robert Schwartz 
J Alvin Somberg 
Igor Tamm 
William F. Thompson 
Patricia B. Tudbury 
Ellis J. VanSlyck 
Laura B. Weed 
M. Henry Williams, Jr. 
Eugene P. Yoklavich 
Sumner Root Ziegra 

1948 

Russell J. Barrnett 
George F. Batten 
Edith M. Beck 
Lee Buckingham Brown 
tRichard Steele Buker, Jr. 

Arthur L. Coleman, Jr. 
•(•Bradford S. Colwell 
Ruth E. Cortell 
G. Robert Downie 
Mrs. Carl P. Duncan 
Elizabeth F. Eisner 
Boy Frame 
Emil Frei, III 
Julian Frieden 
B. Herold Griffith 
Sylvia P. Griffiths 
Beatrix A. Hamburg 


Richard M. Hannah 
W. Rayner Johnson 
Paul B. Koehler 
Robert C. Lawson 
Robert E. Lempke 
John P. Morris 
John B. Morrison 
David E. Morton 
tjames W. Needham 
{Gerald R. Nowlis 
Jessie E. Parkinson 
tRichard C. Peterson 
George P. Rostel 
Lewis P. Rowland 
Benjamin F. Rush 
Anne Godley St. Goar 
Gabriel A. Saviano 
Jerome H. Shapiro 
Howard B. Simon 
Paul Talalay 
Wallace W. Turner 
Paul Woodbury Weld 

1949 

William G. Anlyan 
Alfred E. Bacon, Jr. 
Henry W. Baird, III 
Richard L. Barach 
William D. Bevis 
Jonathan S. Bishop 
Mary Pucci Couchman 
Phillip G. Couchman 
Peter R. Cunningham 
Rex P. Dannebaum 
N. Joel Ehrenkranz 
Daniel W. Elliott 
Gunnar O. Eng 
Albert A. Fisk 
Frederick Forro, Jr. 

Paul Goldstein 
Eleanora C. Gordon 
t Frederic W. Gray 
Daniel K. Halvorsen 
Boaz Harris 
Jackson Harris 
Benjamin A. Johnson 
Frank D. Law 
Orval I. McKay 
Timothy F. Nolan, Jr. 
Richard D. Otis 
Julian I. Pichel 
Edmund L. Piper 
Charles L. Rennell, Jr. 
Samuel M. Rice 
Murray Z. Rosenberg 
Daniel Rudman 
Carl M. Russell 
William H. Sewell, Jr. 
Ruth Spielmeyer 
Raymond D. Sudarsky 
Mary P. Wine 

1950 

Russell N. Anderson 
Lyal D. Asay 
Sylvia L. Axelrod 
Arthur Cinader 
Alexander D. Crosett, Jr. 
Alvin Davis 
Claude W. Delia 
Kent Ellis 

Thomas J. Ferraro, Jr. 
Yvette F. Francis 
David A. Frucht 


Carl A. Gagliardi 
Archie J. Golden 
Chesterfield G. Gunn, Jr. 
Wallace M. Kemp, Jr. 
Marilyn M. Kritchman 
Sidney S. Lee 
John B. LeRoy 
Milton E. Lesser 
Janus C. Lindner 
Margaret S. Lyman 
Harry L. McClelland 
Robert T. McSherry 
Jocelyn S. Malkin 
Harold March 
John H. Meyers 
Marina P. Meyers 
Orlando J. Miller 
William T. Newton 
Robert T. Sceery 
Cynia B. Shimm 
Jane B. Shumway 
Martin E. Smith 
John S. Strauss 
Myra D. Tyler 

1951 

Karel Bedrich Absolon 
Goffredo S. Accetta 
W. Robert Adams 
Frank R. Allen 
tS. David Ardell 
{Eleanor Clay Bigley 
Allan A. Brandt 
John J. Egan 
Lawrence R. Freedman 
Sidney S. Furst 
Ralph M. Gofstein 
Lowell I. Goodman 
John T. Groel 
Robert N. Hamburger 
{John V. Haxo 
Carrold K. Iverson 
Alfred D. Katz 
William Kiekhofer 
Robert D. King 
Barbara Lipton 
Robert W. Lusk 
Robert C. Merrill 
Francis L. Merritt 
Walter S. Morgan 
Karle Mottet 
Albert R. Mowlen 
Richard S. Munford 
Ismail Nik Nevin 
Charles A. Nugent, Jr. 
Jose Felix Patino 
Arthur A. Pava 
{Majic S. Potsaid 
Sidney Roston 
tRobert G. Small 
William F. Stephenson 
Harold M. Sterling 
{Bradley R. Straatsma 
John L. Sullivan 
William A. Taylor 
tHerbert P. Ungricht 
James Walker 
Andrew S. Wong 

1952 

John W. Arnold 
Kenneth G. Bartels 
Francis Feld Bloom 
Max Bloom 


{Maurice L. Bogdonoff 
Willard R. Centerwall 
Siegried A. Centerwall 
{Charles W. Chace 
Frank R. Coughlin, Jr. 
Philip Gardner Deane 
Richard N. DeNiord, Jr. 
Raymond S. Duff 
{James R. Durham 
Richard D. Floyd 
Marvin H. Goldberg 
Arthur P. Hustead 
William W. Klatchko 
David Kligler 
Charles F. Lester 
William R. Letsch 
James Kent Luce 
Wilbur P. McNulty, Jr. 
Louis R. Mattie 
Robert G. Petersdorf 
Leon A. Phillips 
John M. Roberts 
Jack R. Royce 
Leonard Rush 
Elizabeth M. Rush 
Mary Wheatland Schley 
Donald H. Schultz 
Robert B. Schultz 
Jeanette Schulz 
Virginia Lee Swanson 
Maurice Van Lonkhuyzen 
{John H. Wagner, Jr. 

Robert I. Weed 
Doris L. Wethers 
John L. Wolff 
Harvey L. Young 
Seymour Zoger 
1953 

Seth F. Abramson 
Claude T. Anderson 
Arthur D. Berman 
Claude Bloch 
Harold D. Bornstein 
William R. Chaffee 
Allen Chetrick 
Rex B. Conn, Jr. 

Louis R. M. Del Guercio 
James P. Dunn 
Jack Durell 

James Milton Eglin, Jr. 
Donnell D. Etzwiler 
Thomas O. Gentsch 
Vincent Lynn Gott 
Robert Emanuel Hamlisch 
A. Daniel Hauser 
George L. Hoffman, Jr. 
David Purdy Holman 
Peter Biggs Hukill 
Alvin Joseph Keroack 
Robert Francis Kiley, Jr. 
Richard Robert Knowles 
Frederick Martin Lane 
Hildegard Mueller Leslie 
Preston Lee Leslie 
John D. Lord 
Robert N. Melnick 
Harvey Martin Peck 
Warwick Potter, Jr. 

Paul G. Quie 
Jose Ramirez-Rivera 
John Downing Rice, Jr. 
Barbara Fay Rosenberg 


47 






Irwin Kay Rosenberg 
Virginia C. Saft 
Richard Andrew Sinnott, Jr 
John Frazier Snyder, III 
Mary Alma Soule 
{Lynn Cortland Stoker 
Albert Lawrence Stone 
Matthew Andrew Tandysh 
William Junior Vandervort 
tWilliam A. Whalen, Jr. 
William August Wilson, Jr. 
James Frederic Young 

1954 

William D. Ashworth 
Frank P. Berg 
George W. Bostwick 
Richard J. Bouchard 
George N. Bowers 
Saul W. Brusilow 
Ralph K. Campbell 
John R. Cole 
William Cone 
Alan H. Covey 
Arthur C. Crovatto 
Donald D. Davis 
Michael De Nicola, Jr. 
{Frederick J. Fiederlein 
Walter J. Freeman, III 
John A. Gariepy 
Samuel T. J. Giammona 
Frank L. Gruskay 
Nicholas A. Halasz 
Robert P. Hatch 
Walker R. Heap, Jr. 

Leland E. Hilburg 
Samuel J. Hunter 
Herbert S. Hurwitz 
{Robert F. Hustead 
Robert J. T. Joy 
Robert P. Knight, Jr. 

Donald S. Kornfeld 
Lowell A. Kristensen 
Richard Lamb 
Frederick J. Lind, Jr. 

Eva Henriksen MacLean 
Harry C. Miller, Jr. 

Paul R. Neufeld 
James J. Nora 
Lowell E. Olson 
William J. Paule 
{Anthony V. Piccirillo 
Richard D. Pullen 
Jacques M. Quen 
Edwin R. Ranzenhofer 
Earl D. Rees 
David M. Robinson, Jr. 

John Keith Rose 
Elihu M. Schimmel 
Leonard M. Silverman 
William H. Soderstrom 
Robert L. Stein 
Martin B. Vita 
John W. Vosskuhler 

1955 

John B. Atwater 
John C. Bailar, III 
{George E. Becker, Jr. 

E. Edward Bittar 
Jerome Bobruff 
Douglas G. Boyden 
Irwin M. Braverman 
Edward Noel Brennan 


Padraic Burns 
Leo R. Cardillo 
Nicholas A. Coassin 
Edward D. Coppola 
Milton Corn 
Pasquale James Costa 
John G. Daley 
Fred Wendell Doyle 
William S. Elliott 
Leroy Engel 
F. Robert Fekety, Jr. 
Edwin G. Fernand 
Richard B. Foster 
Mahlon V. R. Freeman 
James Conway Garlington 
Barbara Gibson 
Rudolph J. Goerke, III 
Paul Gonick 
Dicran Goulian, Jr. 

Ion Gressar 
Thomas T. Harkness 
John H. Hodge 
D. Franklin Johnson, Jr. 
{Walter L. Johnson 
Harry O. Kendall 
David R. Kessler 
Robert A. Kramer 
Edward A. Krull 
William E. Lattanzi 
Gilbert M. P. Leib 
Dorothy Baird Leib 
Roger Lester 
James Lum 

Joseph S. McGuire, Jr. 
Alexander Maitland, III 
David Joseph Nelligan 
{Robert C. Nodine 
Sherwin B. Nuland 
Gloria E. Onque 
Edward J. Ottenheimer 
John Chandler Pace, Jr. 
Robert H. Peters, Jr. 
{Gregory Peterson, Jr. 

Robert A. Reich 
{Paul J. Robinson, Jr. 

F. Brantley Scott 
Clement B. Sledge 
Philip W. Smith 
Alan A. Stone 
Alexander Zuckerbraun 
1956 

Alan E. Apfel 
Alvin D. Benjamin 
Peter Bios, Jr. 

Levon Z. Boyajian 
Arvid J. Bradley 
Thomas M. Brown 
John F. Carroll 
Joseph C. Cerny 
Edwin L. Child 
James C. Collias 
Louis A. Corvese 
Chandler Dawson 
Shirley E. Downing 
Mitchell Edson 
Gilbert M. Eisner 
Thomas F. Ferris 
John B. Fine 
John H. Gardner 
Sumner Gochberg 
Rosalie Burns Goldberg 
George E. Green 


Alan R. Gurwitt 
Armen C. Haig 
John H. Hart 
{Robert L. Hill 
William H. Hindle 
Theodore E. Hoffman 
Charles L. Hopper 
George T. Kammerer 
Jerome O. Klein 
William V. Lewit 
Leo Lutwak 
Preston C. Manning 
Dwight F. Miller 
Elmer T. Mitchell 
Norman F. Moon 
William M. Narva 
Alexander F. North 
David H. Page 
Robert L. Powell 
Stewart E. Pursel 
John Y. Pyo 
Robert J. Rice 
Robert Lee Scheig 
James Scheuer 
Edward C. Senay 
Benjamin A. Shaver, Jr. 
Donald William Sherrick 
Daniel Silbert 
Donald R. Sperling 
Theodore K. L. Tseu 
Marion Babcock Warbasse 
Charles Zigun 
1957 

Joseph S. Amenta 
Vincent Andriole 
Louis V. Avioli 
Calvin Bigler 
Jack Norman Blechner 
Carl A. Brinkman 
{Richard I. Brever 
John P. Carey 
{Albert C. K. Chun-Hoon 
Louis Z. Cooper 
Harold Dick Cross 
Brian Crowley 
John D’Agostino, Jr. 

F. Joseph Dannemiller 
James R. Dorr 
Edward Louis Eyerman, Jr. 
Salvatore Falbo 
Harold J. Fallon 
Ronald Harrison Fishbein 
Robert E. Fishbein 
Anthony L. Fons, III 
Elizabeth Held Forsyth 
Gary A. Fry 
Robert H. Glass 
Anne LeConte Good 
Jack Peter Green 
Malcolm Hill 
Joshua A. Hoffs 
Gilbert F. Hogan 
Warren R. Johnson 
Richard Lee Kahler 
Robert Lincoln Kaiser 
Stanley E. Kilty 
William L. Kissick 
George C. Knovick 
Willard A. Krehl 
Jack Levin 
Bennett F. Markel 
Mark D. Marshall 


David E. Martin, III 
Howard Alyn Minners 
Robert K. Modlin 
Hugh Lamson Moffett 
{George Albert Nelson, Jr. 
Herbert A. Newman 
Thomas Francis O'Brien, Jr. 
Robert D. Osborn 
Raymond E. Phillips 
Clifford B. Reifler 
Lathrop E. Roberts 
Melville P. Roberts 
Jesse G. Rubin 
Arnold A. Schoolman 
Stanley Simbonis 
Kenneth A. Simon 
Charles A. Slanetz, Jr. 

Gilbert B. Solitaire 
Robert W. Southworth 
Donald C. Stahl 
Romeo Vidone 
William J. Waskowitz 
Herbert Winston 
Robert E. Youngen 
James G. Zimmer 
1958 

George Aghajanian 
Don P. Amren 
John P. Arnot 
Alfred Benson 
John C. Bjorn 
A. Russell Brenneman 
Gerard N. Burrow 
Benjamin Bursten 
John A. Carlston 
Joseph J. Cillo 
Robert V. Diserens 
Robert J. Donohue 
Lawrence Dubin 
Donald A. Duncan 
Philip R. Fazzone 
Michael E. Fishman 
Raymond A. Gaito 
John C. Gallagher 
Marcia Kraft Goin 
William M. Gould 
James Greenwald 
Charles A. Hall, Jr. 

Stanley Harris 
Ernest L. Hartman 
George W. Hulme 
Michael Kashgarian 
Haskins K. Kashima 
Jay W. Kislak 
{Theodore W. Lieberman 
Myron Lotz 
Jack Wayne Love 
William S. McClanahan 
Andrew Joseph McGowan, Jr. 
F. Patrick McKegney, Jr. 
Roland Guy Martineau 
John A. Merritt, Jr. 

Richard Charles Miller 
Robert Neuwirth 
David W. O'Keeffe 
Carol Fenton Phillips 
David M. Pugh 
William B. Radcliffe 
Paul Rudnick 
William W. Schlaepfer 
Thomas R. Shea 
Bruce H. Sklarew 


48 






Richard E. Sledden 
tDelbert B. Smith 
Arlene Smith Sweedler 
Daniel Robert Sweedler 
Raymond W. Turner 
Margaret Smith Wenzel 
John Patrick Wood 
Pauline B. Wood 
tRobert W. Wroblewski 

1959 

Scott Ingram Allen 
Carol J. Amick 
Robert M. Amick 
Asa Barnes, Jr. 

Francis A. Beer 
Jack F. Bowers 
William C. Butterfield 
Edwin M. Clayton 
Martin Colodzin 
Lyall S. Crary 
Harry W. Dawson 
Ronald C. DeConti 
William L. Donegan 
Gerald Fenichel 
Robert L. Fisher 
Robert J. Gonyea 
Gerald B. Gordon 
David Gowing 
Philip John Griffin 
W. Keith Hadley 
James H. Halsey, Jr. 

H. Rodney Hartmann 
William H. Heydorn 
C. Richard Hinckley 
Leonard Inker 
William J. A. Jablonski 
John J. Jasaitis 
Edvardas Kaminskas 
Herbert J. Kaufmann, Jr. 
Kristaps J. Keggi 
David W. Kingsbury 
Kathryn Huxtable Lewis 
Michael J. McCabe 
Daniel L. Macken 
John C. Marsh 
tVictor A. Matalka 
Peter M. Molloy 
N. Ronald Morris 
James A. O’Neill, Jr. 
Robert H. Ostberg 
Nicholas M. Passarelli 
Charles A. Phillips 
Lincoln T. Potter 
James D. Prokop 
James R. Ralph 
David Pardee Reed 
Joseph Saccio 
Constantine J. Sakles 
Marvin L. Schulman 
Marc D. Schwartz 
Owen A. Shteir 
David B. Skinner 
Carl Hugh Smith 
Sanford P. Solomon 
James J. Stagnone 
Lisa Steiner 
John S. Strauss 
Leo H. von Euler 
tRobert Whitney 
Muriel D. Wolf 

1960 

Victor Altshul 


Alan Ames 
Colin Mercer Bloor 
Stuart P. Bowne 
Ormond V. Brody 
Donald P. Buebendorf 
^Stanley Chung 
Gerald N. Cimmino 
Neil R. Cooper 
Louis A. D'Avanzo 
David Paul Dunn 
March Enders 
Warren H. Fisher 
Paul Jay Friedman 
Alvin E. Friedman-Kien 
Eugene C. Gaenslen, Jr. 

Gary Earl Gathman 
James I. Gilman 
Malcolm G. Golden 
Sylvia D. Grant 
Daniel M. Jones 
William S. Kaden 
Susan T. Kleeman 
Thomas P. Kugelman 
Edward R. Lang 
Thomas Lau 
Edward Longo 
Robert Marcus 
Donald L. Miller 
D. Kent Morest 
Richard G. Morrill 
Allan W. Newcomb 
Buford L. Nichols, Jr. 

J. Thomas Okin 
Fred Palace 
Jerrold M. Post 
Nancy Rolick Powell 
Martin L. Reite 
Charles H. Robinson, Jr. 
Albert Matthew Ross 
Daniel J. Rubin 
John J. Schrogie 
Ross L. Snyder, Jr. 

Fred Statgardter 
Robert C. Wallach 
May Yung-Fun Woo Wang 
Ronald A. Yankee 
1961 

Kenneth A. Arndt 

Earl L. Baker 

Frank H. Baker 

Jack D. Barchas 

Albert A. Bechtoldt, Jr. 

Robert S. Briggs 

David William Brook 

Stephen C. Cary 

Orson R. Dee 

Paul David Deiter 

Ralph J. DePonte 

Jon D. Dorman 

Christopher Francis Durham 

Philip Felig 

John E. Fenn 

Charles F. Gibbs 

James M. Giffin 

Edward C. Gilbert 

Robert Sterling Gillcash 

Louis D. Hunt 

Richard L. Keefe 

Thomas Kirsen 

PaulM. Leand 

Marguerite Stein Lederberg 

Robert M. Livingston 


George M. Lordi 
Hugh James Lurie 
Joseph Richard Lusby 
John A. McCormack 
David B. Matloff 
Anoush Miridjanian 
Richard Allen Moore 
Norman Moss 
John Curtis Parker 
John Pearce, Jr. 

Lawrence V. Perlman 
Roy E. Ronke, Jr. 

John H. St. Andre 
Thomas H. Sakado 
Stanley G. Schade 
Robert N. Taub 
Hugh C. Thompson, III 
Franklin H. Top, Jr. 

David E. Weaver 
Warren D. Widmann 
Murray Wittner 
John R. Woodward 

1962 

Charles B. Anderson 
Frederic P. Anderson 
Ann Brace Barnes 
Spencer J. Brody 
David Morse Bull 
Dean E. Burget, Jr. 

Thomas Newell Chase 
George Palmer Christian, Jr. 
Richard N. Collins 
Oliver Townsend Dann 

I. Bruce Elfenbein 
Joseph D. Ferrone, Jr. 
Jonathan E. Fine 
John W. Foreman 
Stephen John Fricker 
Roger P. Friedenthal 
Roderick C. Haff 
John H. Hageman 
John T. Harrington 
Frank R. Hartman 
Patricia C. Hassakis 
Cornelis Heijn 

J. Dale Howe 
Victor W. Hurst, III 
Gary Jacobson 
Walter Watson Karney 
David E. Knoop 

Alan D. Lieberson 
John P. Lynch 
Malcolm A. Martin 
Allan L. Mattern 
William George Meffert 
George S. Miller 
William A. Miller 
Malcolm S. Mitchell 
David D. Nicholas 
Karlen L. Paulay 
A. Richard Pschirrer 
Joseph Ross 
James A. E. Spencer 
Larry Lee Stewart 
H. Oliver Stoutland 
Sherwood Waldron, Jr. 
Stewart R. Wright 
William Farnsworth Weber 

1963 

Miguel R. Alonso 
Wayne D. Brenckman 
Samuel A. Brown, II 


Charles W. Carl 
Theodore J. Chu 
Gordon S. Cohen 
James S. Dalsimer 
Dudley Seth Danoff 
Andrew Edin 
John P. Eliopoulos 
B. Allen Flaxman 
David H. Fran 
William T. Friedewald 
David H. Fulmer 
Alexander R. Gaudio 
F. John Gennari 
Vincent F. Geremia 
Lee D. Goldberg 
Peter B. Gregory 
Robert A. Grummon 
Benjamin Keith Harris 
David M. Holden 
George H. Holsten, III 
Harold P. Kaplan 
Constantine D. Kyropoulos 
Edward C. Larkin 
tWilliam B. Lehmann 
Peter Livingston 
Craig H. Llewellyn 
Edward G. Lund, Jr. 

Sally Lockwood Marchesi 
Vincent T. Marchesi 
tRobert H. Margulis 
Herbert Meltzer 
Robert E. Mueller 
Sheldon R. Pinnell 
Jay M. Pomerantz 
Gene R. Profant 
Berkeley L. Rich 
Alan E. Shapiro 
Lee Bland Talner 
Thomas W. Tillack 
Peter V. Tishler 
Lawrence Tremonti 
Peter G. Weiner 
Seth M. Weingarten 
James G. Wepsic 
Edward F. Wilson 
Jerome Allen Winer 
1964 

William A. Alonso 
Millard J. Amdur 
Sidney M. Baker 
Leland S. Berger 
William H. Bishop, Jr. 
Philip Blume 
Anthony Bravo 
William Virgil Brown 
Thomas A. Cardella 
Joseph F. J. Curi 
Mary V. DeGangi 
Paul Dodd 
Lawrence A. Downs 
Beverly Ann Dudek 
Alfonso Esguerra 
Remo Fabbri, Jr. 

Anthony Ferrante 
Norman C. Fost 
Barry Gault 
Peter A. Gross 
John F. B. Haney 
Gene I. Higashi 
Richard Hockman 
Lawrence Horwitz 
William J. Houghton 


49 




David Porter Johnson 
Douglas W. Johnston 
Martin J. Kligerman 
Lewis Landsberg 
Richard V. Lee 
Thomas L. Lentz 
James S. Levine 
Paul R. Lightfoot, Jr. 
Richard Murray Linburg 
Robert W. Lyons 
Thomas McCann 
Andrew E. MacMahon 
William Matchett 
Robert L. Mitchell 
Alan H. Morris 
James J. Murphy, Jr. 
Donald A. O’Kieffe, Jr. 
Howard C. Pomeroy 
Jack S. Rice, Jr. 

SaulM. Schanberg 
Norman Scher 
Robert L. Shelton 
Donald G. Skinner 
A. Thomas Snoke 
Lyall C. Stilp, Jr. 

Sigrid L. Tishler 
Charles Vogel 
Stephen Waltman 
Oscar Wand 
1965 

Jon R. Almquist 
Thomas Takemic Aoki 
Susan A. Aoki 
John H. M. Austin 
Hector R. Bird 
Victor J. Burner 
Thomas B. Caldwell, III 
David G. Campbell 
Grant L. Christian 
Dewey A. Christmas, Jr. 
Robert M. Cohn 
John M. Coyle 
Michael J. Cummings 
Carl Ellenberger, Jr. 
David S. Fedson 
Robert I. Finkel 
Richard I. Frankel 
Christopher C. Gates 
Michael D. Gorman 
Frank J. Grady 
Gary Lawrence Gross 
William Grossman 
Robert A. Gryboski 
James K. Gude 
Reid R. Heffner, Jr. 
David A. Hill 
Edgar W. Hull 
Carl E. Hunt 
Phyllis Judith Hurwitz 
Virginia B. Johnson 
Samuel D. Kaplan 
Ronald J. Karpick 
Mohandas M. Kini 
Robert H. Koehl 
Richard J. Kozera 
David J. Kupfer 
Sandra Chook Levine 
Mark W. Lischner 
Michael B. Mayor 
Walter W. Noll 
A. Lawrence Ossias 
Robertson Parkman 


John A. Parrish 
Robert L. Pickens 
Alan N. Rachleff 
William A. Renert 
John F. Schilke 
John H. Seashore 
Margretta Ann Seashore 
David M. Shames 
David P. Simmons 
Harlan Spitz 
E. James Stanley 
Jonathan Titus 
Robert G. Weiner 
William M. Wexler 
David J. Williams 
Bert Yuan-shu Wong 
1966 

Benjamin F. Balme 

John D. Baxter 

Patricia H. Bazemore 

Robert P. Bazemore 

Frank C. Bell 

Philip Bernstein 

Stanley H. Block 

James Edward Brown 

Donald J. Cohen 

Joseph A. Donadio 

Robert Dragon 

Marvin A. Eisengart 

Jared M. Emery 

Peter M. Fitzer 

Peter D. Gibbons 

Jeffrey B. Gluckman 

Robert A. Gunn 

Mary Alice Houghton 

Richard J. Howard 

Bruce W. Jackson 

Wilbur Kukes 

Lynne L. Levitsky 

Caroline O. McCagg 

Henry B. Mann 

David B. Melchinger 

John S. Melish 

Harold Mellin 

William Y. Moores 

Eli H. Newberger 

Edward J. O'Keefe 

Neil J. Peterson 

William D. Peterson 

James G. Sansing 

Clarence T. Sasaki 

Joel Singer 

Parker J. Staples 

Alan William Stone 

Gary L. Townsend 

Lee Van Lenten 

Joan Trowbridge Wayland 

Jon S. Wayland 

John W. Wickenden 

William B. Yeagley 

Arne S. Yongberg 

Richard B. Yules 

1967 

Daniel L. Arons 
Arthur L. Beaudet 
Richard S. Bockman 
Gary C. Burget 
William T. Cave 
David M. Conkle 
Cynthia Jane Rapp Curry 
James J. Dineen 
Timothy J. Dondero, Jr. 


Alexander F. Dora 

James M. Dowaliby, II 

John A. Drews 

Peter R. Egbert 

Dennis Grant Egnatz 

Herbert W. Felsenfeld 

Marian D. Gilpin 

Melvin Victor Goldblat 

Richard J. Hart 

Richard L. Heppner 

Peter N. Herbert 

George P. Herr 

David L. Ingram 

J. Robert Kirkwood 

Melvyn Korobkin 

Carl E. Lane 

Anthony P. Lovell 

Laura Kirchman Manuelidis 

Ralph G. Maurer 

James V. Miller 

Stephen W. Miller 

William J. Mitchell 

Joseph L. Morris 

Jennifer Robinson Niebyl 

Robert Henry Noth 

John O. Pastore 

Daniel F. Phillips 

Brian F. Rigney 

James J. Robinson 

Robert I. Roy 

Jonathan L. Saveli 

Stephen C. Schimpff 

Sidney C. Smith, Jr. 

Helen Smits 
Lewis S. Solomon 
Robert S. Steinberg 
Richard B. Swett 
M. David Tilson, III 
Karen H. Toker 
Mary F. Williams 
Redford Williams 
Peter M. Zeman 
1968 

Stuart J. Brill 
Rutledge W. Currie 
Edward M. Drury 
Barbara Mayer Egbert 
Lamar Ekbladh 
Alan G. Finesilver 
William F. Flynn, Jr. 
Richard A. Getnick 
Leonard Grauer 
Ralph S. Greco 
Kevin N. Hennessey 
Harry S. Holcomb, III 
Thomas R. Johnson 
Marian Grace Jordison 
Daniel E. Keim 
Jeffrey S. Lee 
Marc E. Lippman 
Ellen E. M. Lippman 
Peter A. Livingston 
Frank E. Lucente 
Donald O. Lyman 
John Allen McCutchan 
Maria Z. McCutchan 
Rodrigo Martinez 
Harmon Michelson 
David P. Millett 
Richard M. Morehead, Jr. 
James B. Morris 
Peter Nicholas, Jr. 


James W. Ogilvie 
Henry F. Panek 
Francis F. Paul 
Jackson B. E. Pickett, III 
Joseph L. Renda 
Gordon H. Sasaki 
Alfred Q. Scheuer 
Jacob J. Schlesinger 
Bruce Stuart Schoenberg 
Gerald L. Springer 
Lee H. Strohl 
Edmund C. Tortolani 
Martin Wand 
James L. Weiss 

Public Health Alumni 

1922 

Robert Jordan 

1927 

Alice S. Baldwin 
Louis DeAngelis 

1929 

Mitchell B. Stock 

1933 

Evelyn H. Halpin 

1934 

Iwao M. Moriyama 

1935 

Franklin M. Foote 

1936 

Henry Packer 

1937 

Lidie Venn Dyer 
Matthew H. Griswold 

1938 

Willard H. Boynton 
Richard K. C. Lee 

1939 

Carl I. Cohen 
Edith M. Foster 

1940 

Hugh R. Leavell 
Meyer J. Plishner 
Ruth G. Taylor 

1941 

Eleanor Hassell Kerby 
Roslyn L. MacNish 
Barbara Kilduff Mango 
Thomas L. Meador 
Alexander Witkow 

1942 

Leonard Parente 

1943 

Paul T. Bruyere 
Eric W. Mood 
Miriam Hahn Rohde 
Adele P. Schlosser 
Carolyn S. Silagy 
Jane Lyman White 

1944 

Jean Ferguson Heston 
Lily Berman Mostyn 

1945 

Mary B. Dale 
Claudia B. Galiher 
Naomi Barer Golden 
Lois M. Jund 
Naomi Helen Kalajan 

1946 

Dorothy Young Kirk 
R. Edward Vioni 


50 







t 


1947 

Richard H. Schlesinger 

Edna Miller Finberg 

1961 

Glady Jacoby Goldman 

Martin Donabedian 

Hannah O. Hotvedt 

Alfred E. Fletcher 

Leah Lehrer 

Helen M. O’Connell 

Raymond W. Leonard 

Herbert Rubenstein 

Josephine S. Lewis 

Parnie S. Snoke 

Cecil G. Sheps 

Raymond C. Walker 

Oscar Sussman 

1962 

1948 

Thomas A. Blumenthal 

Samuel S. Herman 

John R. Galbraith 

Barbara L. Holman 

1963 

Sylvia O. Johnson 

Jordan Braverman 

1950 

John B. Currie 

Dorothy R. Granoff 

C. du V. Florey 

Martha P. Jayne 

David Dollins 

Dorothy E. Reese 

Sydney Luria 

Arthur N. Springall 

George Eddy Parker 

1951 

Rosemary W. Stevens 

Hector R. Acuna 

Samuel B. Webb, Jr. 

Clarissa E. Boyd 

1964 

Alice C. Devers 

Maria S. Baisier 

Leonard F. Menzcer 

Elizabeth C. Beilis 

1952 

Barbara Weed Christine 

Morris A. Granoff 

Martin Hirsch 

Joanna Adele Henry 

Neal L. Maslan 

Yolande F. Lyon 

Caroline S. Profant 

Naomi B. Markthaler 

Estelle Siker 

1953 

Arthur M. Silfen 

Jeanette Averill 

Monroe W. Spero 

Harold Robert Bernshock 

1965 

Abraham Cutcher 

fH. Patterson Harris, Jr. 

Graydon Dorsch 

James F. Jekel 

Grace T. N.Jansen 

Peter J. Levin 

Laurence K. Rainsford 

Eliot A. Segal 

Constance B. Thomas 

Sarah L. Turner 

1954 

1966 

Alvin Hamburg 

Barbara L. Brody 

1955 

Joseph I. Garfinkel 

Lester M. Bornstein 

Dorothy N. Kane 

Amy L. Cawley 

Raif E. Nassif 

Israel Gitlitz 

Donald D. Payne 

Morris London 

Katherine Berridge Sohler 

Mary McC. Mogan 

Lillian Welch 

Gerald Rosenblatt 

1967 

Daniel E. Ross 

David R. Bailey 

1956 

Gerard M. Barber 

E. St. George Anderson 

Rosalie M. Berberian 

David D. Boyd 

Alice L. Cobb 

Marvin H. Burton 

James R. Hamill 

Kathleen H. Howe 

Ronald M. Holloway 

Robert Woods MacCalmont, J 

r. Joel Kavet 

Mary K. Ochiai 

Lawrence Krone 

Ruth E. Woodfall 

Joseph F. Kukla 

1957 

Patricia D. Mail 

William A. Clermont 

James M. Malloy 

Edward R. DeLouise 

Sherwin Mellins 

Lillian E. Jenkins 

Elizabeth Mueller 

1958 

Elizabeth A. Murphy 

J. Philip Keeve 

Charles J. Petrillo, Jr. 

Thomas P. Weil 

Brigitte A. Prusoff 

1959 

Bruce J. Steinhardt 

Cesar A. Aleman 

Irma Willner 

Rita Dingman 

Robert L. Woodward 

Folly Hofer 

Richard C. Yeomans 

William L. Kissick 

1968 

John S. Pullman, Jr. 

Sonia M. Colon 

R. Martosewoyo Soejono 

Chester H. Johnson 

Janet L. Thomson 

R. Elizabeth Leif 

1960 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter V. Leif, Jr. 

Bruce A. Barron 

Arnold R. Saslow 

John J. Kwasnowski 

Howard P. Smoller 


Hannah G. Russell 


Parents 

Mr. & Mrs. Irving J. Bader 
Mr. & Mrs. Louis A. Bartha 
Mr. & Mrs. John D. Burns 
Mr. Sidney A. Charlat 
Mr. & Mrs. Philip Chessin 
Mr. Edward F. Ciesielski 
Mr. & Mrs. Sidney J. Cohen 
Mr. Samuel A. Coleman 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles D. Cook 
Mr. & Mrs. H. Pelham Curtis 
Dr. & Mrs. Joseph S. Diasio 
Dr. & Mrs. Edmond Edelson 
Dr. & Mrs. Samuel Epstein 
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Henry Falkenstein 
Dr. & Mrs. Morris Feller 
Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Fernbach 
Mrs. Bernice Kamerman Finesilver 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Gardner 
Mr. George S. Getnick 
Mr. Charles M. Greco 
Mr. & Mrs. Irwin L. Heimer 
Mr. & Mrs. David Kaufman 
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene T. Kinder 
Mr. & Mrs. Harry Koss 
Mr. & Mrs. Aaron Kotler 
Mr. & Mrs. Peter Victor Leif, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Ah Chun Loo 
Mr. & Mrs. Sam Marks 
Dr. & Mrs. Frederick Menick 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank T. Minehan 
Dr. & Mrs. Paul H. Noth 
Mr. & Mrs. Leslie P. Ogden 
Dr. & Mrs. Edward Jay Olinger 
Dr. & Mrs. Jack Pearl 
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Perlman 
Mr. & Mrs. Anthony V. Proto 
Mr. & Mrs. Nelson B. Record 
Mr. & Mrs. Julius Robinson 
Mr. & Mrs. Ronald M. Sato 
Mr. & Mrs. Irving Saveli 
Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell Schoenberg 
Mr. & Mrs. Clarence L. Sharpe 


Mr. & Mrs. Louis R. Siegel 

Mr. & Mrs. James W. Singer 

Mr. & Mrs. James B. Slaughter 

Mr. & Mrs. Herman Aaron Snider 

Mr. Philip Soskis 

Mrs. Gertrude T. Weissman 

Mr. Jacob Werne 

Mr. & Mrs. George F. Weygant 

Mr. & Mrs. R. K. Yoshizumi 


Contributions to the Yale School of Medicine through 
the American Medical Association — Education and 
Research Foundation 


119 Total contributors in the amount of $2,565.50 
100 alumni who contributed through AMA-ERF are 
designated by (f) or under their classes elsewhere in 
this report. 

Listed below are 19 contributors through AMA-ERF 
who are not alumni of the Yale School of Medicine. 


James O. Balfour 
James C. Branch 
Jerome T. Combs 
Seymour Haber 
L. M. Keer 

Morton M. Kligerman 
Martha F. Leonard 
Paul T. C. Lin 
J. Wister Meigs 

Women's 


John R. Mitchell 
Fredrick C. Redlich 
Raoul A. Schmiedeck 
Ben Schulak 
Charles K. Skreczko 
Marcel Thau 
Ulrich Hans Weil 
John L. Wolf 
Eiji Yanagisawa 
Auxiliary, Cascade 


51 

















1 



I 









YALE MEDICINE 


333 Cedar Street 


New Haven, Conn. 06510 


NON-PROFIT ORG. 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

New Haven, Conn. 
Permit No. 8 


MEDICAL ALUMNI DAY 
AND CLASS REUNIONS 
SATURDAY, MAY 23,1970 


1970 MAY 

1970 

s 

M T 

W T 

F S 




1 2 

3 

4 5 

6 7 

8 9 

10 

11 12 

13 14 

15 16 

17 

18 19 

20 2122(23) 

24 

31 

25 26 

27 28! 

29 30 | 


MARK YOUR CALENDAR 






















\